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NUMEROUS ENGRAVINGS OF ANIMALS, IMPLEMENTS, AND OTHER SUBJECTS INTERESTING

TO THE AGRICULTURIST.

BY

CUTHBERT W. JOHNSON, ESQ. F.R.S.

BARRISTER AT LAW; EDITOR OF THE FARMER'S ALMANAC; CORRESPONDING MEMBER OF THE
AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY OF KÖNIGSBERG; THE HORTICULTURAL

SOCIETY OF MARYLAND; ETC. ETC.

Adapted to the United States.

PHILADELPHIA:
CAREY AND HART.

1844

ENTERED according to Act of Congress, in the year 1843, by

Carey & HART, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

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PREFACE

THE AMERICAN EDITOR.

The Farmers' Encyclopædia, as originally published in England, contained much matter not particularly interesting to those living on the western side of the Atlantic. In the American edition, the localisms and irrelevant portions have been supplanted by the introduction of much information more immediately relating to rural affairs in the United States. In effecting these alterations, the matter introduced by the American editor amounts to about thirty per cent., all of which has been derived from the best sources of intelligence. The main objects which interest the American farmer, such as cattle, and the great crops of maize, cotton, tobacco, hemp, and other staples of the north and south, have received the most particular attention.

In treating of farm-stock, implements, &c., the editor has had no individual interests to serve, and no prejudices to bias him. He has, therefore, doubtless, often failed to say all that partiality or predilection might have dictated in particular cases, and the discussion of the relative merits or demerits of contested agricultural subjects he has left to be carried on in the most appropriate places, namely, the pages of the numerous excellent periodical publications, industriously employed in diffusing the lights of agricultural science through every part of the Union. To many of these the editor is deeply indebted for most valuable information, the particular sources of which he has been careful to acknowledge in the proper places. A volume filled with so much instruction upon agricultural and rural affairs as will be found condensed in this Encyclopædia, cannot fail to be welcome to all parts of the United States in which the general diffusion of education has created a thirst for the best information.

On announcing the work, the American publishers engaged to give sixteen numbers of sixty-four pages each. This promise they have more than fulfilled. The book will be found to comprise 1173, instead of 1024 pages.

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