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OF THE

MEDICAL SCIENCES.

EDITED BY

ALEXANDER FLEMING, M.D., AND W. T. GAIRDNER, M.D.

FEBRUARY TO DECEMBER

1848.

WITH TWO LITHOGRAPHIC PLATES AND SEVERAL WOODCUTS.

EDINBURGH: SUTHERLAND AND KNOX, GEORGE STREET.

LONDON : JOHN CHURCHILL, PRINCES STREET, SOHO.

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1.—MEDICAL PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY; AND NATURAL HISTORY. Article 1.-On the Elasticity and that, as the diameter of the nerve Cohesion of the Principal Tissues of the diminishes, its proportional cohesion inHuman Body. By M. G. WERTHEIM. -M. Wertheim, who has already published By dessication, the elasticity and conumerous determinations of the elasticity hesion of all the tissues increases, and apof inorganic substances, has now extended proximates more nearly to that of inorhis experiments to the animal tissues. ganic substances.- Annales de Chimie et These experiments were made by loading de Physique, December 1847. a strip of the substance to be examined, of known length and diameter of section, 2.-Professor Rogers on the Absorption with increasing weights, and measuring of Carbonic Acid by Sulphuric Acid.the increase of length in its extended. At the meeting of Association of Ameristate, and that to which it returned when can Geologists and Naturalists, held at the weight was removed, and finally as Boston in September last, Professor W. certaining the weight required to produce B. Rogers gave an abstract of a series of rupture. The results of his experiments researches lately made by himself and are contained in an extensive series of Professor R. D. Rogers, on the absorptables, for which we must refer to the tion of carbonic acid by different liquids. original paper. The general conclusions in these investigations the important fact deducible from them are the following. was ascertained, that sulphuric acid at

The specific gravity of the tendons, 60° Fahrenheit, absorbs carbonic acid gas muscles, and veins, diminishes with age: in the large proportion of 94 per cent., But this change is not generally observed and that Nordhausen acid absorbs 125 in the bones, nerves, and arteries. In the per cent. Professor Rogers pointed out latter, owing to thickening and ossifica- how this fact must affect the accuracy of tion of the coats, it is sensibly increased. certain methods of determining the amount

The increment in length of a bone is of carbonic acid in the free atmosphere, proportional to the weight by which it is as in the experiments of Boussingault and extended, exactly as is the case with in- others, and of that contained in the air organic substances, and wood ; but this of mines, and in the air expired in respidoes not hold good with the soft parts ration. The use of the sulphuric acid as in their natural state of humidity, the law a drying agent in these processes, as well of their increment in length being repre as in the apparatus of Fresenius for anasented by a curve approximating to a lyzing the carbonates, was thus shown to hyperbola.

be attended with serious errors, in conseBones, tendons, and nerves, increase in quence of the absorption of the carbonic elasticity with the age of the subject, but acid by the dessicating agent. the reverse occurs in the muscles.

The elasticity and cohesion of bones is 3.-Dr John Davy on the Urinary Segreatest, then come tendons, nerves, mus cretion of certain Animals considered in cles, veins, and arteries.

connexion with their Temperature, Food, The nervous trunks have, in proportion &c.- In birds, possessing of all animals the to their section, an amount of cohesion in- highest internal temperature, whether they ferior to their immediate branches, and be graminivorous or carnivorous, the urine then again to the cutaneous nerves ; so consists chiefly of lithate of ammonia. VOL. I.--NO. I.

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