Transactions, Volume 7

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American Association for the Study and Prevention of Infant Mortality, 1917

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Page 15 - Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia. Florida Georgia Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Missouri Montana Nebraska New Hampshire New Jersey New...
Page 158 - ... increase in the birth rate is noted in Madison, Wis., where in 1915 the birth rate was 164 per cent, higher than in 1910. Increases in birth rates as shown in the preceding table are absolutely inexplicable on the basis of a normal increase in fertility and can be explained only on the ground of improved registration. Our conclusion is, therefore, that in the cities listed above the number of births reported in 1910 was entirely untrustworthy and that birth registration had improved perceptibly...
Page 40 - Seriously, is it not an astonishing fact, that though on the treatment of offspring depend their lives or deaths, and their moral welfare or ruin, yet not one word of instruction on the treatment of offspring is ever given to those who will...
Page 302 - Know how much a baby should grow in weight each week for the first six months, in height for each month for the first year. The relation of weight to disease and vitality. * Know and describe three kinds of baby cries and what they mean. * Care for a baby for an average of an hour a day for a month.
Page 302 - Know how milk should be prepared for a six-months-old baby"; "Know what is good milk for a baby a year old, and how it can be tested...
Page 46 - Never had a doctor in the house except when the babies were born " is a common report. The last stage in the evolution of the farm is usually the payment of the mortgage. Most of the land near the railroads where it is at all suitable for farming has been occupied for a good many years; the newly settled and unsettled districts are more remote. But accessibility was evidently not the only factor in determining which parts of the county were first chosen for farming...
Page 128 - ... essentially the same throughout the country, whooping-cough being almost everywhere more fatal than scarlet fever and less fatal than diphtheria. Whooping-cough is an especially serious disease in the Southern states, as is shown by the fact that in Xorth Carolina 736 children died of whooping-cough in 1911 against a total of 447 from scarlet fever, measles and diphtheria combined. The death-rate from whooping-cough in North Carolina in 1911 was 32.2 per cent, against 11.4 per cent, for the whole...
Page 132 - No death occurred in any patient who presented himself before the third week and received vaccine treatment regularly. As a prophylactic, Luttinger thinks that the vaccine is efficient if used sufficiently early and that it is capable of aborting the disease if no time be lost in its use. The possibility of immunizing by vaccination is still an open question for pertussis.
Page 242 - The same conditions which cause the death of thirteen out of every 100 babies born throughout the civilized world leave more or less permanent stamps on perhaps two or three times as many more babies who somehow manage to crawl over the infant dead line, many of whom will be the fathers and mothers of the next generation. The problem of infant mortality, therefore, is far more than one of decreasing the number of infant deaths. Its scope is world-wide, and on its partial solution at least depends...
Page 203 - Snvder, superintendent of school buildings, department of education, New York City; Dr. C. Ward Crampton (now of Battle Creek, Mich.), director of physical training; Dr. IH Goldberger, assistant director of educational hygiene, department of education. Miss CC Van...

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