Political Party Platforms: In Presidential Campaigns 1840 to 1904

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Globe printing Company, 1904 - 184 pages
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Page 19 - That as our Republican fathers, when they had abolished slavery in all our national territory, ordained that " no person should be deprived of life, liberty or property, without due process of law...
Page 117 - We have witnessed for more than a quarter of a century the struggles of the two great political parties for power and plunder, while grievous wrongs have been inflicted upon the suffering people. We charge that the controlling influences dominating both these parties have permitted the existing dreadful conditions to develop without serious effort to prevent or restrain them.
Page 32 - Resolved, That we, the delegated representatives of the Republican electors of the United States, in Convention assembled, in discharge of the duty we owe to our constituents and our country, unite in the following declarations : 1. That the history of the nation, during the last four years, has fully established the propriety and necessity of the organization and perpetuation of the Republican party, and that the canses which called it into existence are permanent in their nature, and now, more...
Page 89 - That the liberal principles embodied by Jefferson in the Declaration of Independence, and sanctioned in the Constitution, which makes ours the land of Liberty, and the asylum of the oppressed of every nation, have ever been cardinal principles in the democratic faith...
Page 10 - That the proceeds of the public lands ought to be sacredly applied to the national objects specified in the Constitution ; and that we are opposed to any law for the distribution of such proceeds among the States, as alike inexpedient in policy and repugnant to the Constitution.
Page 32 - That to the union of the States this nation owes its unprecedented increase in population, its surprising development of material resources, its rapid augmentation of wealth, its happiness at home, and its honor abroad; and we hold in abhorrence all schemes for disunion, come from whatever source they may...
Page 96 - In a Republic like ours, where the citizen is the sovereign and the official the servant, where no power is exercised except by the will of the people, it is important that the sovereign— the people— should possess intelligence. The free school is the promoter of that intelligence which is to preserve us a free Nation...
Page 66 - For the Democracy of the whole country we do here reaffirm our faitli in the permanence of the Federal Union, our 3 devotion to the Constitution of the United States, with its amendments universally accepted as a final settlement of the controversies that engendered civil war, and do here record our steadfast confidence in the perpetuity of republican self-government.
Page 25 - That justice and sound policy forbid the federal government to foster one branch of industry to the detriment of another, or to cherish the interests of one portion to the injury of another portion of our common country...
Page 118 - ... agreed together to ignore, in the coming campaign, every issue but one. They propose to drown the outcries of a plundered people with the uproar of a sham battle over the tariff, so that capitalists, corporations, national banks, rings, trusts, watered stock, the demonetization of silver and the oppressions of the usurers may all be lost sight of. They propose to sacrifice our homes, lives, and children on the altar of mammon ; to destroy the multitude in order to secure corruption funds from...

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