The Sons and Daughters of Los: Culture and Community in L. A.

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Temple University Press, 2003 - 266 pages
Los Angeles. A city that is synonymous with celebrity and mass-market culture, is also, according to David James, synonymous with social alienation and dispersal. In the communities of Los Angeles, artists, cultural institutions and activities exist in ways that are often concealed from sight, obscured by the powerful presence of Hollywood and its machinations. In this significant collection of original essays, "The Sons and Daughters of Los "reconstructs the city of Los Angeles with new cultural connections. Explored here are the communities that offer alternatives to the picture of L..A. as a conglomeration of studios and mass media. Each essay examines a particular piece of, or place in, Los Angeles cultural life: from the Beyond Baroque Poetry Foundation, the Woman's Building, to Highways, and LACE, as well as the achievements of these grassroots initiatives. Also included is critical commentary on important artists, including Harry Gamboa, Jr., and others whose work have done much to shape popular culture in L.A. The cumulative effect of reading this book is to see a very different city take shape, one whose cultural landscape is far more innovative and reflective of the diversity of the city's people than mainstream notions of it suggest. "The Sons and Daughters of Los" offers a substantive and complicated picture of the way culture plays itself it out on the smallest scaleOCoin one of the largest metropolises on earthOCocontributing to a richer, more textured understanding of the vibrancy of urban life and art."
 

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- The essays in the book, shifts perspective, I learnt in the course of working on such material and reading such material, to invest myself in a different kind of experience of the urban-space, even one as built-over as LA. Viewing this city of Angels, as an enormously differentiated, culturally surprising, spiritually curious, historically critical landscape, sheltering such a different range of peoples... Thanks David, as always. 

Contents

BEYOND BAROQUE AND
15
THE LOS ANGELES WOMANS BUILDING AND
39
AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY
63
REMARKS ON THE FOUNDATION
108
KOREAN COMMUNITY IN LOS ANGELES
153
A HISTORY OF L A FREEWAVES
174
TOMAS BENITEZ TALKS
195
SWANS THAT FLOCK TO
211
THE CASE
231
About the Contributors
253
Copyright

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Page 12 - Edward W. Soja, Postmodern Geographies: The Reassertion of Space in Critical Social Theory (London: Verso, 1989).
Page 8 - It cannot be put out of view that the exhibition of moving pictures is a business pure and simple, originated and conducted for profit, like other spectacles, not to be regarded, nor intended to be regarded by the Ohio constitution, we think, as part of the press of the country or as organs of public opinion.
Page 6 - The gravest and most painful testimony of the modern world, the one that possibly involves all other testimonies to which this epoch must answer...
Page 13 - Culture is a paradoxical commodity. So completely is it subject to the law of exchange that it is no longer exchanged; it is so blindly consumed in use that it can no longer be used. Therefore it amalgamates with advertising. The more meaningless the latter seems to be under a monopoly, the more omnipotent it becomes. The motives are markedly economic. One could certainly live without the culture industry, therefore it necessarily creates too much satiation and apathy. In itself, it has few resources...

About the author (2003)

David E. James is Professor in the School of Cinema-Television at the University of Southern California. He is the author or editor of five books, including, most recently, Power Misses: Essays Across (Un)Popular Culture.

Contributors: Jiwon Ahn, University of Southern California; Meiling Cheng, University of Southern California; Sande Cohen, California Institute of the Arts; Harry Gamboa, Jr.; Eric Gordon, University of Southern California; Claudine Isť, University of California, Los Angeles, Laura Meyer, University of California, Los Angeles; Bill Mohr; James Moran; Nithila Peter, University of Southern California, and the editor.

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