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SUMMER TERM AT THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL.

KANSAS STATE NORMAL SCHOOL.

in the state has such complete facilities for boarding and rooming. During the year it is sufficient to accommodate two thousand students. It is not advisable to engage board and

room before coming, as a personal choice of these always gives Ninth Annual Session, June 15 to August 16, Inclu

the best satisfaction. sive-Nine Weeks.

Many former students usually summer here, claiming that As already announced in the NORMAL MONTHLY and other

they can live in Emporia cheaper and more comfortably than

elsewhere. papers, the Regents have provided for a summer term of the School to open June 15, 1899, and to continue nine weeks. All Books.—The books used are practically those given in the of the departments except physical training will be represented Normal catalogue. Second-hand copies of these books are ard classes will be formed in every subject in the course of abundant at the stores. It will be worth while to bring any study offered by the School. This summer term will be a great text books you may have on the subjects you wish to study. boon to teachers who wish to advance themselves in their pro- Conditions of Admission.—The same general rules for adfession and yet do not feel financially able to give up teaching mission to the Normal department will govern for the summer and attend during the regular school year. Many graduates of term, though students meeting the entrance requirements will this and other institutions of learning have so often expressed be permitted to select subjects in any part of the course witha desire for such an opportunity to take up professional or oth- out restriction. As each subject will be completed in the term, er special studies that we are satisfied that this vacation session however, no student will be permitted to take more than two of will prove even more popular than any of the summer schools the regular half year subjects listed in the catalogue or four heretofore conducted by individual members of the Faculty. one-fourth year subjects or their equivalent without formal con

Expenses.-As the Legislature has made no appropriation sent of the Faculty. for a summer term, it must be maintained by fees. The fee Sub-normal and preparatory classes will be organized for the for the nine weeks' session has been fixed at $13 for two or benefit of those who are unable to meet the entrance requiremore subjects, or $10 for one subject. Of the fee named, $3 ments and who may wish a review of the elements of the comis required for enrollment, the balance being designated as a mon branches. Said classes will be under the general supervistuition fee. Students entering for less time than the full term ion of the Director in Training and teachers from the senior will pay the enrollment fee of $3 and a tuition fee of $i per class who may wish to complete their practice teaching will be week for one subject, or $1.50 per week for two or more. assigned to conduct them. The tuition fee for these classes

In case of protracted absence on account of sickness or other will be $3 enrollment and $1 for each study taken. cause satisfactory to the Faculty, the fee for the part of the Children from the city and vicinity will be admitted to the term in actual attendance will be reckoned in same manner as kindergarten and primary classes in charge of Miss Morgan. for students entering late and the unused balance refunded, These classes will recite from 8 to 10:30 a. m. Fee, $5, $3 of but in no case will the enrollment fee or the fee for a fraction which will be refunded if the child attends full time; otherwise of a week be refunded.

no part of it will be refunded except in case of protracted sickPleasant accommodations within easy reach of the building ness. can be secured at very low rates. Rooms in private families Class Records. The regular rules of the institution conrent for from $3 to $6 per month. Meals in clubs or private cerning term and examination grades will govern for the sumfamilies range from $1.75 to $2 per week. Rooms and meals in mer term and all records made will be recognized in a course private families range from $2.35 to $3.25 per week. Students for graduation. The Regents issue diplomas at their Septemmay rest assured that the same kind of accommodations can ber meeting to such students as may have finished a prescribed be secured here at as little expense as elsewhere. No other city course in the sumi

mmer term.

Professor ABBOTT-Clay Modeling (1), Wood Carving (2). Miss DUDLEY-German A (1), French A (3), German B (4),

French B (5).

* Professors Hill and Iden will be absent during the session, but their places will be supplied by teachers of nigh scholarship and of established reputation.

Professor Abbott provides a teacher in his place after he leaves for the N. E. A, in July.

Practice teaching in the model school will be assigned to vacant hours as far as possible.

Observing and practice teaching in the kindergarten and primary methods classes will be assigned to convenient hours from 8 to 10:30 a. m.

If there is a demand for school law, it will be taught also.

The afternoon of Thursday, June 16, will be occupied in reg. istration and assignment to classes. For further particulars, address,

A. R. TAYLOR, President, Emporia, Kansas. READING CIRCLE BOOKS

ADOPTED BY

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The Kansas Teachers' Reading Circle Board,

March 8, 1899.

of Education,70c. Lecky's "The American Revolution," s$e: Price for the Set

, . . . $1.40. Published by D. APPLETON & Co., 203 Michigan Avenue.

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. BOOKS BY FRANK V. IRISH. American and British Authors. Truly an American work on Literature. Full cloth, 344 pages. Price, prepaid, $1.35. Introduction, $13.30 per doz., prepaid. Grammar and Analy. sis by Diagrams. Price, prepaid, $1.25. Orthography and Orthoepy. Cloth, 128 pages. Price, prepaid, 50 cents. Introduction, $3.80 per dozen, prepaid. Treasured Thoughts. A literary gem-book. Cloth, 160 pages. Price, prepaid, 50 cents. All four books, prepaid, $3.00.

Address, FRANK V. IRISH, Columbus, Ohio.

The State Board of Education gives its August examination in the building soon after the term closes.

Instrumental and Vocal Music.-The department of music will give private lessons as usual on the following terms: Piano, or voice culture, two lessons a week, $13.50; one lesson a week, $8.50; harmony, $10 for the term. Enrollment for all these classes is made with the Secretary and his receipt for tuition will be the permit to enter the class. Send to Prof. C. A. Boyle for special music circular.

Special Advantages.-Emporia is one of the most attractive cities in Kansas. It is centrally located and easily reached from any part of the state. It contains nearly 10,000 inhabitants, and is noted for its many beautiful homes and churches. Lying on the ridge between the Neosho and Cottonwood rivers, its natural drainage is perfect, and it is, consequently, one of the healthiest cities in the West. The moral and educational tone, as well as the business enterprise of its citizens, cor

combine to make it the ideal place for an institution of learning. The Normal school building is cool, convenient, commodius. For students in special studies requiring their use, its admirable laboratory and museum facilities are available. The finely selected general library of nearly fourteen thousand volumes will be open for the use of all students. In short, an ideal combination of enjoyment and profit is presented to Kansas students and teachers for their summer's work, as the experience of those who have engaged in the work during the past eight years abundantly testify.

The following is the program which is subject to amendment if demands of students should warrant it.

The letter accompanying each subject indicates the term in the course to which it belongs; the figure indicates the hour of the recitation. The recitation hours in order will be from 7 a. m. to 7:50; 7:55 to 8:45; 9:05 to 9:55; 10 to 10:50; 10:55 to 11:45. Devotional exercises will occupy the time from 8:50 to

Attendance will be optional except on Wednesdays. After the first two weeks Professor Wilkinson will conduct the class in philosophy of education. If the demand for practice work in the training classes requires Professor Wilkinson's time during the fourth hour, Doctor Chrisman will conduct the class in advanced psychology. President Taylor-Philosophy of Education H (2). Professor WILKINSON-Management G (1), Training Class

G (2), Methods G (3), Psychology G (4), Training Class

(5). Professor Hill*— Cicero D (1), Vergil F (2), Elementary

Cæsar B (3), Advanced Caesar C 14), Latin Beg. A (5). Professor MarSLAND--Rhetoric B (1), Elocution A (2), Eng

lish Literature D and F (3), Oratory E (4), Literary Crit

icism F (5). Professor SteveNSON-Advanced Bookkeeping (2), Pen

manship A (3), Bookkeeping B (4). PROFESSOR GRIDLEY-Drawing C-2 (1), Drawing E (2), Draw

ing D (3), Drawing C-1 (4). Professor MORGAN-Kindergarten Theory ((1), Kinder

garten and Primary Methods G (5). Professor BOYLE-Music D (1), Music E (3). PROFESSOR WHITNEY-History United States B (2), General

History C (3), Civil Law F (5). Professor ELLSWORTH –Geography A (3), Grammar A (4). Professor CHRISMAN-History of Education E (1), Child

Study H (2), Political Economy E (3), Elementary Psy

chology and Methods of Study (5). Professor Wooster-Geology F (1), Physical Geography B

(2), Botany C (3), Zoology E (5). Professor IDEN*--Chemistry E (2), Astronomy F (3), Physics

D (4), Physiology G (5). Professor Payne-Arithmetic A (1), Algebra C (2), Algebra

B (3), Trigonometry and Surveying E (4), Geometry Ď (5).

9 a. m.

THIS is the photographer who

made a majority ot the photos for the cuts in the kodak, Below is a partial list of the names of the faculty and prominent students who had their photographs made F. A. LOOMIS' Studio last year. We are better prepared this year than ever for a large trade, haviug employed more help, enlarged our rooms and added many more mod. ern conveniences for keeping up the high standard of our work.

F. A. LOOMIS,
White Show Cases, Commercial St.

MESSRS.
Labar. Detamore. Chrisman.
Kline. Means. Harner.
Keller. Atkeson, Elias.
Dunbar. Van Voris. Malloy.
Moore. George. Garlic.
Chapman. Agrelius. St. Clair.
Stroup. Gifford. Boyer.
Evans.

Featherngill. Bowles.

Cunningham.

MISSES.
Hoaglin. Gridley. Cochran. Monney. Bates. Philo.
Clark.
Brobst. Soult.

Morris, Bacon. Newlin. Heywood. Van Aken. Shank.

Martin. Knowles. Cook. Van Voris. Meser. Turney. Elias. Good.

Evans. Tanner.

Ilowe. Mossman, Hoffer. Stittsworth. Holloway. Austin.

Maples. Plackett. Thomas. DeVault. liarber. Stuckey. Kelson. Gardner, Christy. Tangeman. Young. Milligan. Taylor. Harris. Whitney. Perkins. Owens.

Whitbeck.
Orpheus Club. Thirteen Club. German Club. Revel of Naiads.
Normal Band. Normal Orchestra. Statuary,

Views,
Philomathian Cast.

Philomathian Art Cast.
Besides a majority of the '97 Alumni.

CENTURY

PEN. GET THE BEST...

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DON'T EXPERIMENT.

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The Farmers' Feed Yard.

418-422 Mechanics Street.
New wagonette for parties, picnics, etc., also a
line of good Livery. Can furpish rigs or teams
at as low rates as any stable in Emporia. Normal
patronage solicited. Barn Tel. 42. Res. Tel. 111.

Will do well to call on us. Our Goods are First.
Class in Every Respect. Try us.
Yours to serve,

A. BUCHANAN,

023 Commercial St.

HEWETT, No. 12, West Sixth Ave.

Turkish Candy Kitchen.

Vol. XI.

EMPORIA, KANSAS, JUNE, 1899.

No. 9

THE STATE NORMAL MONTHLY.

ISSUED TEN TIMES PER YEAR.

THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL,

EMPORIA, KANSAS.

Enoch Arden," bringing out all the pathos and beauty of this piece. With dramatic fire Miss M. Leonore Steele gave the selection, “Sergius to the Lion,” in such a manner that the audience were transported to the ancient amphitheatre and saw in imagination the thrilling scene. "The Massacre of Zoroaster" was presented by Miss Maud Terhune in a vivid manner and was appreciated by the audience. The contest in declamation was unusually strong. The judges, Pres. J. C. Miller, Rev. J. T. Foster and Mrs. J. M. Miller, awarded first place to Miss Steele and the second place to Mr. Blood.

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SUBSCRIPTION, FIFTY CENTS PER YEAR.
Entered in the postoffice at Emporia, Kansas, as secoud-class matter.

All orders for subscriptions and all inquiries concerning advertising space should be addressed to

STATE NORMAL MONTHLY, Emporia, Kansas.

COMMENCEMENT WEEK.

Senior Class Reception. The evening of June 2, 1899, was the occasion of the senior reception by President and Mrs. Taylor at their home.

Despite the lowering clouds, at eight o'clock the members of senior class and the faculty began to gather and the gloom of the outside was soon forgotten in the cheer and kindliness which pervades this home.

The different rooms were decorated with the colors of the respective societies, while here and there oxeye daisies lent their softening influence. Ambrosia was served from a generous punch bowl during the evening by young ladies and later the guests partook of cream and cake in the dining room.

The evening was passed under the stimulating influence of music and conversation. Towards its close each member of the faculty tried his ability at story telling with much resultant

E. G. GANOUNG. merriment.

At a late hour the guests bade farewell and departed home- The event of the evening was the debate. E. G. Gangung, ward realizing how much more the relations sustained by pupil in his plea that the powers should preserve the autonomy of and teacher might mean than that expressed by the mere words China, clearly outlined the position of the affirmative and pupil and teacher.

showed a complete grasp of the knowledge of conditions bear. Debate and Declamation Contest.

ing on this subject. R. T. Phinney, on behalf of the nogative, The contest in debate between representatives of the Philo

by an able argument in which the points were well projected

and driven home with telling effect, replied. The second mathian and Literati societies and in declamation by students chosen from the first year classes was the most interesting oc

speaker on the affirmative, Miss Maud Brobst, in a masterly currence of the week. Many members of the societies came

speech, showed what a wealth of argument, sound and forcefrom a distance in order to be present. The friends of the con

ful, lay on the affirmative side. Following her Mr. Gray came

Mr. testants were out in force determined to lend every aid which

in support of the negative. His delivery was earnest. enthusiasm could furnish. Each society had succeeded in

Ganoung closed the debate. effectively decorating the box assigned to it, so that with the While the report of the judges, F. S. Larabee, A. H. Turner stage decorations Albert Taylor Hall presented a pleasing

and Rev. Frank G. Ward, was being made up the boys of the sight to the eye and needed only the animated countenances

contesting societies engaged in a few vocal exercises suitable and sparkling eyes of those who rapidly filled the room.

to the occasion. The opening number was given by the Euridice Club, and, President Miller, representing the judges, announced the after the invocation and another song by the club the contest, decision briefly. Mr. Phinney received first place, Miss Brobst in declamation was on.

second, Mr. Gray third, and the Literati was awarded the deMr. J. W. Blood gave an account of “The Deacon's Horse bate. Then followed the wild rush and the carrying of the Trade.” The rendition was realistic and satisfactory to the victors to the hall. audience. Miss Inez M. McGregor rendered “The Return of Below are given the markings of the judges:

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