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Cavanagh, president of the Express Drivers' Union, and the superintendent of the American Express Company; this was held at its office in Franklin Street, Boston, in the presence of the arbitration committee of the Lynn Board of Trade.

An agreement was arrived at subject to confirmation by the union on the one hand and ratification by the chief officers of the company on the other, during the pendency of which all hands returned to work.

On the following day, December 21, this settlement of the strike averted a threatened strike of employees of the company in Boston, in Salem and in Brockton, it is said.

On the 23d of December the union held a meeting, at which Messrs. Hastings and Gardner of the Lynn Board of Trade were present. They gave the following assurance :

The Lynn Board of Trade will guarantee to the Team Drivers Union (local No. 42) that the rate of wages proposed by the American Express Company shall be in force for one year from December 21, 1901, and that no man employed by the American Express Company in Lynn shall be discharged except for incompetency, gross carelessness, intoxication or dishonesty. If necessary, the Lynn Board of Trade will guarantee this proposition with a bond of sufficient amount to satisfy the Team Drivers International Union (local No. 42). This guarantee will also cover the hours of labor which the men are to work, namely, 10 hours per day, beginning at 7 A.M. and continuing until 6 P.M., with one hour for dinner; with the understanding that two or three men are to work evenings up to the departure of the 8.45 P.m. train, with the further understanding that they will not be required to work more than 10 hours per day, and with the further understanding that the men will be changed about so that the men will take turns in doing this late work.

This proposition was not accepted immediately.

We insert the following letter to show the value of such services as public spirited men may render in times of industrial crises, in the hope that such example may find its imitators in all quarters. The letter, which was addressed to Charles H. Hastings and Thomas W. Gardner of the Lynn Board of Trade committee, says :

I sincerely thank you for the valuable service you have rendered the community in your successful efforts to bring about an amicable adjustment of the trouble which has existed between the American Express Company and their employees. A sympathetic strike, which seemed impending, has been averted, to the great relief and satisfaction of all concerned. The speedy settlement of the strike is a good example of the wisdom of appealing to reason, rather than resorting to acts of violence and disorder.

Respectfully yours,

WILLIAM SHEPHERD, Mayor.

On the 27th a final settlement was reached, the company agreeing in writing to pay $52 a month for a 10-hour day, and the agreement guaranteed by the Lynn Board of Trade.

COAL TEAMSTERS LYNN.

On December 16, local Union No. 42 of the Team Drivers' International Union, engaged (in delivering coal, served notice on the coal merchants of the city of Lynn, 10 in number, that the drivers and screeners in their employ desired a uniform working day of 9 hours, and the following new scale of wages, to go into effect on January 1:

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Screeners to be paid $12 a week, and over-time to be paid for at the rate of 40 cents an hour.

An investigation was made, and it was learned that the merchants had the matter under consideration, and did not anticipate a strike. In a short while negotiations were on foot, which were reported from time to time to the Board.

As the first of the year approached, the danger of a strike became more and more apparent. Efforts were made by the Lynn Board of Trade to compose the difficulty. Some concessions were made by the employers, but the men were firm in adhering to their first demands. On the 29th of December, however, the demand was modified, through the efforts of the arbitration committee of the Lynn Board of Trade; but the committees on both sides still failed to agree.

A meeting was called, at which 300 drivers were present. Messrs. Hastings and Gardner of the Lynn Board of Trade submitted the result of their efforts, and urged the union not to strike. The union then took up the consideration of the coal dealers' offer, that 59 hours shall constitute a week, 10 hours a day, except Thursdays, when the working time will be 9 hours; over-time paid at the rate of 25 cents an hour, and cleaning the horses on Sunday $1 extra. Screeners and drivers of one-horse wagons, $12 a week; drivers of two-horse teams, $14; three-horse, $15. Drivers to report at the coal scales with loaded wagons ready to deliver coal at 7 o'clock each morning. This offer conceded the weekly wage demanded, but did not concede the shorter day nor the price for over-time. After a long consideration of the employers' proposition, it was accepted by the union, and the threatened strike averted.

EMPIRE SHOE COMPANY - BROCKTON.

On December 18 a joint application of the Empire Shoe Company of Brockton, shoe manufacturers, and the finishers in its employ, was received. On January 21 the following decision was rendered :

In the matter of the joint application of the Empire Shoe Company of Brock

ton and its employees in the finishing department. PETITION FILED DECEMBER 18.

HEARING DECEMBER 31, 1901. In this case the employees have sought a change from payment by the day or hour to payment by the piece.

After careful deliberation and in view of all the circumstances the Board recommends that prices by the day or hour continue to be paid in the factory of the Empire Shoe Company at Brockton.

By the Board,

BERNARD F. SUPPLE, Secretary.

MCCARTY, SHEEHY & KENDRICK COMPANY

BROCKTON.

On December 19 a joint application was received from McCarty, Sheehy & Kendrick Company of Brockton, shoe manufacturers, and the finishers in their employ.

On February 10, 1902, notice was received that the firm had gone out of business. The case was thereupon dismissed.

CONDON BROTHERS - BROCKTON.

The following decision was rendered on March 5, 1902:

In the matter of the joint application of Condon Brothers & Co. of Brockton,

shoe manufacturers, and their employees in the finishing department. PETITION FILED DECEMBER 23, 1901.

HEARING JANUARY 29, 1902. This case presented for consideration certain questions of price. By request of the parties, after hearing all who desired to speak, an investigation of prices paid at competing points for similar work was made, with the aid of expert assistants. In view of all the circumstances and after due deliberation the Board recommends that the following prices be paid in the factory in question :

Per 24 Pairs.

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Scouring heels,
Blacking heels,

Heel finishing, .
Stoning and brushing,
Heel keying,
Scouring bottoms and top pieces, including pin-wheeling,

$0 16

13

Per Day. Men.

Boys.

Making top pieces, Brushing shanks,
Cutting shanks, Wheeling breasts and foreparts,
Painting bottoms, Faking (or brushing) shanks,
Gumming bottoms, Blacking bottoms,
Polishing bottoms, Burnishing (or rolling) bottoms,
Blacking shanks, Faking (or brushing) and wheel-

ing breasts and foreparts,

$200 $1 25

By the Board,

BERNARD F. SUPPLE, Secretary.

TEAMSTERS - BOSTON.

In December evidences of a difficulty in the teaming industry of Boston and vicinity began to appear in the columns of the daily press.

A demand had been made by the Team Drivers' International Union, local, No. 25, which was put in the form of a proposed agreement, and printed copies were sent to all the master teamsters. The fact that no reply had been sent, after the lapse of sufficient time, was taken as indication of a determined contest, for which both parties were said to be prepared.

The master truckmen were said to number about 1,000, and they had no association ; a small section, however, was

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