Page images
PDF
EPUB

Ticket brokerage-Continued.

Passes, buying of
Rate-war tickets.

Railroad competition, effect of.
Relation of brokers to railroads.
Scalping tickets

Transcontinental railroads:

Consolidation...
Freight rates.

Transportation, Department of, establishment advocated

Underbilling, discriminations through.

Uniform public accounting

Union Pacific Railway, combination with Southern Pacific and Central

Pacific..

United States Fruit Company
United States Steel Corporation
Wages:

Anthracite coal miners

Longshoremen

Railroads

Seamen, ocean and lakes.

Stevedores

Telegraph employees

Telephone employees.

Mississippi and tributary rivers.

New Orleans, ocean traffic at

Railroad transportation, relation to Way bills, uniform

Wealth:

Description and statistics

Inventions, attitude toward

CXXIV-CXXIII

Water transportation (see also Discrimination between places; Long

and short haul)

Review of evidence

Anthracite coal, lake shipments of
Coast wise

Freight rates, influence on rail rates

Great Lakes, vessels...

Labor, general conditions

Lake and river traffic. magnitude and influence

LXXI

LXXX; CXVI-CXX
CLXXIV
CIII-CIV

CCXLIX-CCLI

Profits

Relation to American Telephone and Telegraph Company
Wine, Pacific coast industry
Wyoming, uniform public accounting in

Page.

CXXV

CXXIII

CXXIV

Western States (see also Colorado; Pacific Coast), freight rates.
Western Union Telegraph Company (see also Telegraphs):

Capitalization..

LXVII-LXVIII

CCLXXVIII-CCLXXIX
CCLXXVIII-CCLXXIX

CXXI

CLXV-CLXVI
CCLXXI
CCLV

CCLXV-CCLXVIII

Concentration of

Diffusion of, effect of public ownership

Western Maryland Railroad, parallel with Pennsylvania, and Baltimore and Ohio railroads

CCXXIV-CCXXV
CCXXXVIII

XXI; CLXXV-CLXXIX
XXI; CLXXV
CCLXIX

[ocr errors]

CCLXVII

CLXIV-CLXXIX
XXI-XXIV
CXLIII

XLIX-LI; CCLXV-CCLXXII XXI; CLXXXV XXIII; CLXXXIV-CLXXXIX CLXXXIII-CLXXXIV CLXXIV-CLXXV

XCIX

CCLXXVIII-CCLXXIX

CXCVI

XCV LXXIX

CCIV-CCV
CCIII

CCXXI-CCXXII

CCVI CCXXVIII CCLXXXIV

CCL

TESTIMONY.

INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION.

TRANSPORTATION.

ATLANTA, GA., March 21, 1900.

TESTIMONY OF MR. SAMUEL C. DUNLAP.

General manager, Cornelia and Tellulah Falls Railroad, Gainesville, Ga.

The subcommission of the United States Industrial Commission met at the Kimball House at 9 a. m., Senator Kyle presiding. Mr. Samuel C. Dunlap, general manager of the Cornelia and Tallulah Falls Railroad, Gainesville, Ga., was introduced as a witness at 10.40 a. m., and, being duly sworn, testified as follows:

Q. (By Senator KYLE.) You may give your name, post-office address, and vocation.-A. Samuel C. Dunlap, Gainesville, Ga.

Q. (By Representative LIVINGSTON.) You are connected with railroad enterprises of the State?-A. For the present I have some connection, sir. I have two local roads under my supervision.

Q. (Interrupting.) What is the condition of the railroads in Georgia and the South generally, financially?-A. I want to state first that I have two small roads under my management. One is 65 miles and the other is 20 miles long. I am receiver for the first road, running from Gainesville to Social Circle-the Gainesville, Jefferson and Southern-appointed by the superior court, and though I am general manager of the Tallulah Falls Railway, running from Cornelia to Tallulah Falls, I am not an original railroad man. I have been a lawyer most of my life, up to about 1893, when I was appointed United States marshal. I went from that to the receivership of that road, and I have been managing it since. As far as I know about the financial conditions of the roads, one of my roads is insolvent, and the other has not got any money. As to the larger systems, I think they are all pros

perous. Q. (By Senator KYLE.) You do not think that represents the condition of all roads in the South?-A. No, sir; I think the railroads are making money now, all of them.

Q. (By Representative LIVINGSTON.) How are the railroads controlled in this country, simply by the board of directors, or by railroad commissions, or jointly?— A. I did not catch that question.

Q. How are passenger rates and everything fixed; by railroad commission?-A. Well, the railroad commission make rates, and I believe the roads conform to the particular commission. The railroads have an association, the Southern Freight Association, of which Mr. Parrott is the chairman. They regulate this through it to some extent. I am not a member of that association.

Q. Your roads are not included?—A. I conform generally to the rules, but I am not a member. Being a court officer I did not care to hamper myself with any outside regulations. I have a connection with the Southern Railroad at Gainesville, with the Seaboard Air Line at Winder, and with the Georgia at Social Circle, which is leased now to the Louisville and Nashville and the Coast Line. All those systems are friendly with me. I give them business and get business from them. On the little Talulah road here I depended entirely upon the Southern for all my through business.

Q. The reason why you were subpoenaed is that you are controlling independent lines that were supposed to be entirely outside of these associations and combinations. We hear complaints of the roads giving advantages to terminal points, and we will be pleased to have you say to the commission what there is in this complaint about long 1

16A-1

« PreviousContinue »