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SAMUEL P. NEWMAN,
PROFESSOR OF RHETORIC IN BOW DOIN COLLEGE.

SIXTIETIL EDITION.

NEW YORK:
- PUBLISHED BY NEWMAN AND IVISON,

199 Broadway.
CINCINNATI: MOORE & ANDERSON. AUBURN: J. C. IVISON & CO.

CHICAGO: S. C. GRIGGS & Co.

(1852.

1852.

CR.

THE NEW YORK
| PUBLIC LIBRARY

82777
ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS
R.

1919

Entored according to act of Congress in the your 184, by

FLAGG, GOULD AND NEWMAN, in the Clerk's Ofice of the District Court of Massachusetts.

STEREOTYPED AT THE
POUTON TYPE AND STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY

INTRODUCTION.

The advantages proposed to be attained by the study of

Rhetoric.*

1. Some acquaintance with the philosophy of rhetoric.

2. The cultivation of the taste, and in connexion, the exercise of the imagination.'

3. Skill in the use of language.
4. Skill in literary criticism.
5. The formation of a good style.

By the philosophy of rhetoric, I here refer to those principles in the science of the philosophy of mind, and in the philosophy of language, on which are founded those conclusions and directions which are applicable to literary criticism, and to the formation of style. Obviously, then, it will be said, an acquaintance with the science of intellectual philosophy, and with the philosophy of language, should precede the study of rhetoric. Hence, no doubt, Milton and others assign to this branch of study the last place in a course of education.

But it is known to all, that the prevalent opinion and practice are different from those recommended by Milton; so that our inquiry should be, what is the best practical method of acquainting the young with the philosophy of rhetoric – those whose minds are not accustomed to philosophical investigations, and who are ignorant of those sciences on which the art is founded ? · I answer, that, while the attention should be directed to but few principles, and those most essential in a practical view, instruction should be imparted principally by familiar,

* Extracted from a .ecture delivered in Boston before the American Institute, August, 1830.

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