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W I L L I A M M c K I N L E Y
& E S I D ENT of the UNITED STATES

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*CFFALO NEW YORK on the FIFTH of SEPTEMBrk 1901

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; H E N R Y B . F. M A C F A R L A N ID
President of the Commissioners of the District of Columbia

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of W I L L I A M M c K I NL E Y
PRESIDENT of the UNITED STATES

DELIVERED AT THE PAN-AMERICAN EXPOSITION
BUFFALO NEW YORK on the FIFTH of SEPTEMBER 1901

W I T H A P R E F A T O R Y N O T E B 1"
H E N R Y B. F. M A C F A R L A N D
President of the Commissioners of the District of Columbia

Printed by THE KIRGATE PRESS of LEWIS BUDDY 3rd
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PREFATOR2 NOTE.

RESIDENT McKINLEY'S last speech was his best. He had grown steadily as a public speaker, just as he had grown steadily in every other way, until he had become one of the great orators of his time. Men and women listened to him with interest and pleasure, not simply because he was the President, but because he was an eloquent, convincing and impressive speaker. The expansion of bis character and intellect which took place after be came to the Presidency, and especially after the beginning of the Spanish War, was seen in the increased charm and power of his public addresses. His attractive presence, his fine, resonant yet sympathetic voice, and his graceful manner, increased the effectiveness of what be said. It was not expected generally that his address at Buffalo would be especially interesting or important. Tet many thousands waited in the beat of the sun in front of the temporary stand on the plaza of the Exposition Grounds, to bear him deliver it. They were rewarded with a remarkable address. As the President read it, with the aid of glasses from a small typewritten manuscript, his bearers gradually realized that be was giving forth declarations of policy of great moment. The public men who sat on the stand behind him, and especially the representatives of foreign governments, first appreciated the importance of what the President was saying, but later it was recognized by everyone in the great audience. It was felt that the President was speaking with marked frankness, and that he was laying before the whole world

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