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directly tending to the improvement of the medical profession, and therefore ultimately to the great advantage of those whom they are designed to benefit. It might be shewn, with still stronger evidence, that the particular measure of building chambers for the students, instead of being a sacrifice of money consecrated to another purpose, would be a safe and profitable investment of it. But I am not desirous to press these arguments. The tendency of the age is certainly not toward too literal and scrupulous an interpretation of the wills of founders and benefactors. Where the feeling exists I would not disturb it, even by what might seem to me sound casuistry, nor for the sake of the most important object. It is better to

"Curve round the corn field and the vine-clad hill,

Honouring the holy bounds of property,"

than to take the shortest and apparently the most convenient route, which may involve, if not a trespass, at least a plausible precedent for a future trespass. In this case I do not think there is any difficulty in finding a perfectly legitimate way to the same end.

It is obvious that chambers for the students ought to be as near as possible to the hospital with which they are connected. Some, at least, of these institutions have vacant ground which would be amply sufficient for the purpose. Were it certain that this ground would be granted rent free to persons of respectability who would engage to build chambers after a certain plan, approved by the governors of the hospitals; such chambers to be let to medical students exclusively, at a certain yearly sum, being a reasonable return for the capital expended, and not, on any account, to be exceeded, I apprehend there would be numbers ready to engage in such a speculation. Nay, I am satisfied that so many, for benevolent or commercial reasons, would be anxious to take part in it, that the governors of the hospitals would be able, in the first place, to select the persons whom they would permit to build on their land; and secondly, to stipulate, as the condition of granting that land, for entire controul over everything connected with the chambers, subject of course to certain provisions for securing to the builders the income arising from them. The last condition would be no concession at all on the part of the individual or company advancing the funds; the conductors of the hospitals would be the persons most interested in the good order and keeping of the chambers; and it would be an additional inducement with many to assist such an object, that they would not involve themselves in any unpleasant responsibilities.

What would be saved to the students in a pecuniary point of view by this arrangement I cannot ascertain accurately; but if the difference between the price of lodgings and of chambers was only the same in London as in Cambridge, it would be considerable, and I think it would be greater. That the proprietors of chambers, for the ground of which they paid nothing, and which are certain to be constantly occupied, could afford to let them at a very moderate rate, is obvious. The health and general comfort of the students would be still more promoted by the plan. Some of the largest hospitals are situated in parts of London where it is not likely that lodgings will be particularly airy and commodious. The tenants of these must often wish that they could have residences built, not on the same scale indeed, but in as modern and comfortable a style, as clean and well-ventilated, as the wards which they visit. Such, I maintain, should be provided for them.

These chambers being once built and inhabited, the medical school to which they were attached would insensibly assume the character of a college. To provide a general table for the students would add much to the comfort, and probably to the cheapness of their living. Happily there is no occasion to talk of providing that last thing which, in this day, would be thought necessary-a chapel, for one is already attached to each of the principal hospitals, where the students might at least have the privilege of hearing prayers read every, or nearly every, day in the week. That some officers would be neces

sary for such an establishment, distinct from those connected with the hospitals, who have ample occupation for their time, I do not deny. For a school as large as Christ Church, or Trinity College, Cambridge, (and there is no medical school in London containing so many students as either of these colleges,) five or six (exclusive of men servants) would, I apprehend, be quite sufficient. One as a general superintendent; one to perform the office of dean at our English colleges, (that is, to watch over the discipline of the society ;) one to superintend the economy of the household; two or three to be lecturers of the kind proposed in my last letter. All, I need not say, should be good men and gentlemen, anxious to busy themselves for the welfare of the students, and capable of sympathizing with their feelings and pursuits. And I may add, as an evidence that I am not at all anxious to copy the details of our University system, that I should think if they were married men they would be so much the more respected and useful. The expense of such an establishment, divided among the parents of the youths would be very trifling; not, perhaps, equalling what they would gain by the difference between the rent of lodgings and of chambers-nothing, I should hope, to compensate, in their minds, for the positive advantage to the feelings and character of their sons.

Still I am inclined to think, that the staff of the Medical College might receive, though not immediately, most valuable addition. It seems to me, that a class of men is greatly wanted in the medical profession who shall be to the ordinary practitioner what the Fellows of Colleges are to our parochial clergy. How imperfect and one-sided our church would be without such a body; how these, the formal theologians, uphold the evangelists; the first being lifeless unless they have intercourse with the second; the second being liable to become the creatures of popular impulse, unless their views are strengthened and deepened by the teaching of the first,―all, I hope, are beginning to acknowledge. On the other hand, in the legal profession, we see what evil effects have resulted from there being no class who, apart from the noise of the courts, are meditating upon the principles of law, and endeavouring to avail themselves, for scientific purposes, of the unparalleled variety of facts which the records of English jurisprudence supply. To this want it seems that we may trace the worldly temper and sordid views which too sadly characterize the members of this profession;-at any rate, to this cause it must be owing, that our lawyers are obliged to encounter the crude sophisms of the Benthamites with mere objections of detail; or, if they want theories, to fetch them from Germany.

Now certainly it would strike one that the hospital surgeons and physicians are well fitted to occupy that high scientific position among medical men. That they have not hitherto assumed it is owing, I think, chiefly to the want of some institution like that of which I have been sketching a feeble outline. The temptations of private practice must needs be strong where there is nothing to set against them. But yet there are some persons in this profession, (perhaps most of my readers will recollect one or two among their own acquaintance,) men of talent and accomplishment, fond of the study of medicine, both as a study and for the blessings it confers, yet evidently unfitted to compete with rivals, or to acquire popularity with patients; morbidly conscious of their own deficiencies, too often becoming, through disappointment, censorious and contemptuous towards men as honest as themselves, who possess the qualities and arts which have been denied to them. Were an opportunity held out to such men of retiring from the bustle of competition, of gratifying all their benevolent feelings, and, at the same time, advancing their knowledge by the extensive practice of an hospital-of taking part in the education of the younger members of their body, and, lastly, of pursuing the science of their profession in quietness and with vast advantages, and in concert with others similarly disposed, who can doubt that they would eagerly embrace it? And if they would also co-operate with the other officers of the establishment in advancing, by their society and example, the moral education of the students,

an institution would soon be formed of which England would have reason to be proud; an institution in which numbers of young men would be continually awakened to a sense of their powers and responsibilities, and from which they would go forth to be fellow-workers with the ministers of religion and with all who have at heart the glory of God and the welfare of men. Your obedient servant, F.*

• The following letter from a Medical Student deserves notice:

SIR, Permit me to trouble you with a few observations on a subject to which you have deservedly called the attention of your readers in the last two numbers of your Magazine; I mean the education of Medical Students.

Being myself one of that body, I can assure you that the subjoined extract presents a picture of their state of spiritual destitution, which, although the last twenty years have brought with them some improvement, still remains, in its most important features, but too fearfully correct. Many there are among them, I am happy to admit, whose uniform diligence and propriety of demeanour, testify their adherence to the principles in which they have been educated; but there are many who, whilst they neglect not their professional studies, have become ensnared by the specious sophistries of the sceptic, and who deem their disbelief of the sacred mysteries of religion to be a sign of the superiority of their intellect, and of their emancipation from the shackels which priestcraft and bigotry have forged to enslave the multitude; whilst there remains a vast number of the low, the ignorant, and the vulgar, who spend their days in sloth, and their nights in debauchery, not less regardless of the demeanour of gentlemen and christians, than of the object for which (frequently at a great personal sacrifice) their friends have enabled them to reside in the metropolis. And then, when the time allotted for their education is drawing to a close, they find a sure refuge in the grinders;† who, by dint of hard labour, manage to cram into their heads in a few months, the superficies of that knowledge, which the more industrious spend years in acquiring. Thus prepared, they present themselves before the medical authorities for examination; and, aided by impudence and good luck, they receive full authority to diffuse among their fellow-subjects the beneficial influence of their moral principles and professional skill.

Having thus stated the evil, let me shortly propose the means which alone appear to me to be capable of opposing its farther progress:—and these are, rígid domestic controul, and enforcement of religious discipline. By the first, habitual neglect of study and nocturnal debauchery would be prevented; by the second, the contamination of the good might be in some measure counteracted, the irresolute might be confirmed, the bad reclaimed. I am well aware, Sir, that this proposal is but little in consonance with the spirit of the age, that it will meet with no favour from the so-called enlightened opponents of bigotry, the advocates of an unshackled system of education; I do not hope that its approximation to the model of the old universities will please that ingenuous part of my fellow students, who shew by their fondness for interlinear translations of Celsus and the Pharmacopoeia, that their hostility to those venerable institutions is something more than theoretical. But, sir, I presume to offer it as the result of my personal experience and conviction; knowing as I do, that, even by the better disposed, many indiscretions would have been prevented, many temptations resisted, had the weight of authority given an additional motive for attendance in the lecture-room or the chapel.

It would not, I think, be difficult for the authorities of the new university to establish chambers for the students on an economic scale and under due regulations, or to license the houses of responsible persons for that purpose. As for the enforcement of religious discipline, with regard to those of the established religion, it would be easy; the others might be required to attach themselves to some priest of their respective sects, and to produce periodically from him certificates of their attendance on his ministration.

I know not, sir, whether you may think this letter worthy of your attention; but let me in conclusion entreat you to continue your benevolent endeavours for the establishment of a better-regulated system of medical education.

I am, Sir, your obedient servant,

A MEDICAL STUDENT.

+ Not that I mean to throw any shade of disrespect on the grinders, many of whom are gen. tlemen of the highest respectability and most extensive acquirements, and the manner in which they perform their task is highly creditable to their ingenuity and perseverance.

VOL. IX.-June, 1836.

4 U

Extract from the Life of Mr. Basil Owen Wood, by his Father, in the "Memoirs of the Rev. Basil Wood and some members of his Family," &c., p. 70.

"His time being wholly at his own disposal, he was free from all control in the intervals of his professional lectures...... He often spoke to me with abhorrence of the profligate language of medical pupils. I knew it full well. Never shall I forget the scene I once witnessed in a dissecting-room; the gross indelicacy of language, the irreverent treatment and exposure of the human body, the hardened indifference with which the most affecting instances of mortality were regarded, the assumed contempt of death, the ridicule with which any serious remark was treated, and the wanton profanation of the Word of God. This reckless mockery of sin, in the midst of that death which sin brought into the world, has been sufficient to create in my own mind a wonder, not that my poor son, irresolute and susceptible as he was, should imbibe the contagion, but that any youth should escape its polluting influence. Sin, alas! hardens, and society assimilates, and the horror of vice is worn off by familiarity with it. Such was the case in the present melancholy instance. Any appearance of serious reflection in my son was treated by his companions with contempt and ridicule; he was assailed with infidel insinuation, with raillery, with wine, with temptations of every kind, presented in their most alluring form, while, as his dangers increased, the strength of those principles which alone were capable of preserving him, were gradually more and more enfeebled.”

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The Archbishop of

York intends to hold a general ordination at Bishopthorpe, on Sunday, 31st of July. Candidates are to send their papers before the 1st of July, and to attend at the Palace on Thursday, the 28th of that month.

Boustead,

Corfe, Joseph
Daniel, J. E.

Dowdall, John

CLERICAL APPOINTMENTS.

Head Master of Kirby Lonsdale Grammar School,
Westmoreland.

A Priest Vicar of Exeter Cathedral.

Chaplain to the Hoxne Union Workhouse, Laxfield,

Suffolk.

Domestic Chaplain to the Earl of Burlington.

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Prickett, M.

Minister of Tavistock Chapel, Drury Lane.
Minister of the Parochial Chapel at Camden Town,
St. Pancras.

Head Master of Kibworth Free Grammar School.
Domestic Chaplain to Lord Abinger.

Sacrist of Lichfield Cathedral.

Priest Vicar of Lichfield Cathedral.

Assistant Curate of St. Mark's Church, Woodhouse,

near Leeds.

One of the Chaplains of Trinity College, Cambridge.

Ridding, C. H., V. of Andover, a Surrogate for the diocese of Winchester.

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Chaplain of His Majesty's Ship "Cornwallis," 74.
Chaplain to the Forces on the Madras Establishment.

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Worces. Worcester Earl of Shrewsbury
Sir R. Harland, bt.,
Norwich and others

Suffolk

Ould, Fielding ... Christ Church P. C., Lancash. Chester

Richards, H.
Scott, John..

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Spurgin, John......

Liverpool
Ceido P. C.

C., }

Carnarvon Bangor

{Surlingham St. Mary} Norfolk Norwich

V. St.

C.

Great & Little Hock

ham V.

Winthrop, B....... Wolverdington R.

J. Houghton, Esq.

T. P. J. Parry, Esq.
Rev. Wm. Collett

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