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BIOGRAPHY;

OR,

ANECDOTES

OF THE

LIVES, MANNERS, AND ECONOMY,

OF THE

ANIMAL CREATION,

ARRANGED ACCORDING TO THE SYSTEM OF LINNÆUS,

BY THE REV. W. BINGLEY, A. B.

FELLOW OF THE LINNEAN SOCIBTY,
AND LATE OF ST. PETER'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE,

IN THREE VOLUMES.

VOL. III.

AMPHIBIOUS ANIMALS,-
FISHES, INSECTS,

WORMS.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR R. PHILLIPS, NO. 71, ST. PAUL'S CHURCH-YARD, AND SOLD BY T. HURST, PATERNOSTER-ROW; E. BALFOUR,

EDINBURGH ; AND J. ARCHER, DUBLIN.

1803.

Wilks and Taylor, Printers, Chancery-lane.

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed]

AMPHIBIOUS ANIMALS.

The title of Ampbibia is given by Linnæus to the Reptile and Serpent tribes; or to such animals as have cold blood, and live occasionally both on land and in water. It is true that this may be considered exceptionable on account of some individuals being confined to only one of those situations: these are, however, so very few as not, with any propriety, to affect their general denomination.

Their abode is usually in retired, watery and shady places, where they are, most probably, stationed to prevent the excessive multiplication of water animals and insects; and themselves, in many instances, to serve as food for fishes and birds.

They are able, from the peculiar structure of their organs, to suspend respiration at pleasure; and thus to support the change of element uninjured. They have also the power of enduring a degree of abstinence so great as infallibly to prove fatal to any other order of animals. It is generally asserted and believed, that the

B

VOL. III.

[graphic][subsumed]

AMPHIBIOUS ANIMALS.

The title of Ampbibia is given by Linnæus to the Reptile and Serpent tribes; or to such animals as have cold blood, and live occasionally both on land and in water. It is true that this

may

be considered exceptionable on account of some individuals being confined to only one of those situations: these are, however, so very few as not, with any propriety, to affect their general denomination.

Their abode is usually in retired, watery and shady places, where they are, most probably, stationed to prevent the excessive multiplication of water animals and insects; and themselves, in many instances, to serve as food for fishes and birds.

They are able, from the peculiar structure of their organs, to suspend respiration at pleasure; and thus to support the change of element uninjured. They have also the power of enduring a degree of abstinence so great as infallibly to prove fatal to any other order of animals. It is generally asserted and believed, that the

B

VOL. III.

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