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“Go, take the goose, and wring her throat,

I will not bear it longer.”

IX. Then yelped the cur, and yawled the cat;

Ran Gaffer, stumbled Gammer. The goose flew this

way

and few that, And filled the house with clamor.

X.

As head and heels upon the floor

They floundered all together, There strode a stranger to the door,

And it was windy weather:

XI.

He took the goose upon

his arm, He uttered words of scorning; “ So keep you cold, or keep you warm,

It is a stormy morning.”

XII.

The wild wind rang from park and plain,

And round the attics rumbled, Till all the tables danced again,

And half the chimneys tumbled.

XIII.
The glass blew in, the fire blew out,

The blast was hard and harder.
Her cap blew off, her gown

blew

up, And a whirlwind cleared the larder;

XIV.

And while on all sides breaking loose

Her household fled the danger, Quoth she, “ The Devil take the goose, And God forget the stranger!”

THE EPIC.

At Francis Allen's on the Christmas-eve,-
The game of forfeits done—the girls all kissed
Beneath the sacred bush and past away-
The parson Holmes, the poet Everard Hall,
The host and I, sat round the wassail-bowl,
Then half-way ebbed : and there we held a talk,
How all the old honor had from Christmas gone,
Or gone, or dwindled down to some odd games
In some odd nooks like this; till I, tired out
With cutting eights that day upon the pond,
Where, three times slipping from the outer edge,
I bumped the ice into three several stars,
Fell in a doze; and half-awake I heard
The parson taking wide and wider sweeps,
Now harping on the church-commissioners,
Now hawking at Geology and schism;
Until I woke, and found him settled down
Upon the general decay of faith
Right through the world—“ at home was little left,
And none abroad : there was no anchor, none,
To hold by.” Francis, laughing, clapt his hand
On Everard's shoulder, with “ I hold by him.”
“ And I,” quoth Everard,“ by the wassail-bowl.”
“ Why yes,” I said, “ we knew your gift that way
At college : but another which you had,
I mean of verse, (for so we held it then,)
What came of that ?” “You know,” said Frank,

"he burnt
His epic of King Arthur, some twelve books”
And then to me demanding why? 0, sir,
He thought that nothing new was said, or else
Something so said 'twas nothing—that a truth
Looks freshest in the fashion of the day:
God knows: he has a mint of reasons: ask.
It pleased me well enough.” “ Nay, nay,” said Hall,
" Why take the style of those heroic times ?

For nature brings not back the Mastodon,
Nor we those times; and why should any man
Remodel models ? these twelve books of mine
Were faint Homeric echoes, nothing worth,
Mere chaff and draff, much better burnt." 6. But I,"
Said Francis,“ picked the eleventh from this hearth,
And have it: keep a thing, its use will come.
I hoard it as a sugar-plum for Holmes.”
He laughed, and ì, though sleepy, like a horse
That hears the corn-bin open, pricked my ears ;
For I remembered Everard's college fame
When we were Freshmen : then at my request
He brought it; and the poet, little urged,
But with some prelude of disparagement,
Read, mouthing out his hollow oes and aes,
Deep-chested music, and to this result.

MORTE D'ARTHUR.

So all day long the noise of battle rolled
Among the mountains by the winter sea ;
Until King Arthur's table, man by man,
Had fallen in Lyonness about their Lord,
King Arthur: then, because his wound was deer,
The bold Sir Bedivere uplifted him,
Sir Bedivere, the last of all his knights,
And bore him to a chapel nigh the field,
A broken chancel with a broken cross,
That stood on a dark strait of barren land.
On one side lay the Ocean, and on one
Lay a great water, and the moon was full.

Then spake King Arthur to Sir Bedivere:
“ The sequel of to-day unsolders all
The goodliest fellowship of famous knights
Whereof this world holds record. Such a sleep
They sleep-the men I loved. I think that we
Shall never more, at any future time,
Delight our souls with talk of knightly deeds,

Walking about the gardens and the halls
Of Camelot, as in the days that were.
I perish by this people which I made,–
Though Merlin sware that I should come again
To rule once more—but let what will be, be,
I am so deeply smitten through the helm
That without help I cannot last till morn.
Thou therefore take my brand Excalibur,
Which was my pride: for thou rememberest how
In those old days, one summer noon, an arm
Rose up from out the bosom of the lake,
Clothed in white samite, mystic, wonderful,
Holding the sword—and how I rowed across
And took it, and have worn it, like a king:
And, wheresoever I am sung or told
In aftertime this also shall be known:
But now delay not: take Excalibur,
And fling him far into the middle meer:
Watch what thou seest, and lightly bring me word.”

To him replied the bold Sir Bedivere :
“ It is not meet, Sir King, to leave thee thus,
Aidless, alone, and smitten through the helm.
A little thing may harm a wounded man.
Yet I thy hest will all perform at full,
Watch what I see, and lightly bring thee word.”

So saying, from the ruined shrine he stept,
And in the moon athwart the place of tombs,
Where lay the mighty bones of ancient men,
Old knights, and over them the sea-wind sang
Shrill, chill, with flakes of foam. He, stepping down
By zigzag paths, and juts of pointed rock,
Came on the shining levels of the lake.

There drew he forth the brand Excalibur,
And o'er him, drawing it, the winter moon,
Brightening the skirts of a long cloud, ran forth
And sparkled keen with frost against the hilt:
For all the haft twinkled with diamond sparks,
Myriads of topaz-lights, and jacinth-work
of subtlest jewellery. He gazed so long

That both his eyes were dazzled, as he stood
This

way and that dividing the swift mind,
In act to throw; but at the last it seemed
Better to leave Excalibur concealed
There in the many-knotted waterflags,
That whistled stiff and dry about the marge.
So strode he back slow to the wounded King.

Then spake King Arthur to Sir Bedivere : Hast thou performed my mission which I gave ? What is thou hast seen? or what hast heard ? "

And answer made the bold Sir Bedivere: “I heard the ripple washing in the reeds, And the wild water lapping on the crag.”

To whom replied King Arthur, faint and pale:
Thou hast betrayed thy nature and thy name,
Not rendering true answer, as beseemed
Thy fealty, nor like a noble knight:
For surer sign had followed, either hand
Or voice, or else a motion of the meer.
This is a shameful thing for men to lie.
Yet now, I charge thee, quickly go again
As thou art lief and dear, and do the thing
I bade thee, watch, and lightly bring me word.”

Then went Sir Bedivere the second time
Across the ridge, and paced beside the mere,
Counting the dewy pebbles, fixed in thought;
But when he saw the wonder of the hilt,
How curiously and strangely chased, he smote
His palms together, and he cried aloud.

" And if indeed I cast the brand away,
Surely a precious thing, one worthy note,
Should thus be lost forever from the earth,
Which might have pleased the eyes of many men.
What good should follow this, if this were done ?
What harm, undone ? deep harm to disobey,
Seeing obedience is the bond of rule.
Were it well to obey then, if a king demand
An act unprofitable, against himself?
The king is sick, and knows not what he does.
What record, or what relic of my lord

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