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CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS' BOOKS for SUMMER READING

A Novel of Character UNLEAVENED BREAD by Robert Grant

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THE AUTHOR

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Sascinating in the force of its truth' Cleveland Plain Dealer.-“ It is a wholesome story, most skillfully constructed along natural lines, arousing the better emotions and impressing the highest moral lessons. It is fascinating in the force of its truth, and few who open it will be disappointed."

"the ablest social study of its bort" New York Evening Sun.—“Mr. to the life. And there he has left her. Grant is to be congratulated on an The moral is there or it isn't. But artistic triumph in having succeed. the novelist leaves that to his read. ed in making this woman entirely ers. ... It is about the ablest social objective. He has presented her true study of its sort that we know of.”

Odmirably conceived" Chicago Evening Post —" He includes within his scope fairly the who.e field of our national life, especially the national life of the American woman as it it bourgeoning and blossoming-yea, even unto the present and on into the future. And no American lives who can fail to be amused and instructed by his admirably contrived story." unique creation"

" Has not been erceeded" 1 New York Times' Saturday Review. — “He Brooklyn Eagle.—“ Its main strength lies in presents a drama of life ; he marshals a variety the perfection with which the author has portrayed of characters, each original and vital; his central certain phases of our many-sided social life. It is figure is a unique creation, drawn with the un a social study of existing conditions that has not faltering hand of a master."

been exceeded for vigor of delineation and strength

and delicacy of coloring in a long time."

"It is genuine life" The Independent.—We have never read a better imaginary history of an unscrupulous woman's long and unfaltering chase after the will-o'-the-wisp of social distinction. The details are given with admirable accuracy. It is genuine life that passes before us. We can distinctly feel how powerfully magnetic have been the pages over which we have so steadfastly hung."

Benuinely and delightfully merican” New York Commercial Advertiser.-" There are acter study because that is the side of the book many points of view from which Mr. Grant's book which directly appealed to us, and it is not too might be reviewed, for it is a strong book and a much to say that, as an analytical study of a many-sided one, and, best of all, it is genuinely type, Selma White is the best and most hopeful and delightfully American.

We have piece of work which we have seen in American chosen to review · Unleavened Bread' as a char fiction for several years."

FOURTH

LARGE

EDITION

READY

12mo, $1.50

CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS, Publishers

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A Story of Paul Jones and the American Revolution “, Fare Lehre his grow and

N his titles Archdeacon Brady gives his books a great deal to live up to. 'For Love of Country, the pulse leap! That the strong and stirring stories do live up to their titles is sufficient praise. An ardent patriotism, according generous recognition to the patriotism of the enemy, the rush of the salt sea breeze, the clash of arms, and, best of all, men and women that ring true to the call of duty are in them all. Perhaps because 'The Grip of Honor' is the latest read it seems the best."-New York Times' Saturday Review. Illustrated by Gibbs. Second edition, 12m0, $1.50. For the Freedom of the Sea For Love of Country Illustrated. 30th Thousand. 12mo, $1.50.

Sixth Edition. 12 mo, $1.25
By EDITH WHARTON

The Touchstone "N.

W

O one can read a dozen pages of what Mrs. Wharton writes without being struck by her positive Mr. James, and some of her crisp and brilliant sentences deserve to become classic.

Mrs. Wharton's novel is certain to give to the discriminating reader that rare delight which comes from the combination of remarkable intelligence, an extraordinary power of analysis, and a style that exemplifies precision, grace, lucidity, and, above all, distinction."The Bookman. 12mo, $ 1 25. The Greater Inclination.

By EDITH WHARTON. Fifth Edition. 12mo, $1.50. "11

T is a book of wonderful delicacy and power both, but of cultured power. In workmanship it stands

among the masterpieces of modern Anglo-Saxon fiction-a monument to the possibilities of the language in the hands of a master."--New York Mail and Express.

By BLANCHE WILLIS HOWARD

The Garden of Eden
ITHOUT intention, apparently, and certainly without sensationalism, Monica nearly represents

the long-talked-of 'new woman.' There is freshness and vivacity in the Baroness Arenberg's method of controlling the relations between her husband and Monica, and the dialogue is as sparkling and delightful as anything in 'Guenn'or One Summer.'”—Philadelphia Press. 12mo, $1.50.

Dionysius the Weaver's Heart's Dearest

By BLANCHE Willis HOWARD. 12mo, $1.50. EALTHFUL to the core, full of humor and of brightness, without the sense of strain noticeable “H in some very clever stories.”—New York Times' Saturday Review.

By HARRISON ROBERTSON

Red Blood and Blue “A

with Spain. The hero is a Southern boy who begins life, not only with no advantages, but with a load of debt and disgrace from his father's ill deeds. He succeeds in becoming the man of action of his town and section, and not only builds up a fortune, but, what is better, builds up an independent and fine character. The book is deserving of decided commendation." -- The Outlook. Second edition. 12m0, $1.50. If I Were a Man. By HARRISON ROBERTSON. Ivory Series.

16mo, 75 cents.

S a study in practical politics, written with abundant dash and revealing shrewd insight into

CH A R L E S

S CRI B N E R’S

By JAMES A. WICKERSHAM

Enoch Willoughby

A Novel of the Middle West

"

common people of the Middle West-or, for that matter, any other section-more vividly and effectively set forth. The book is one of the most interesting studies of human character that has lately come before the thoughtful reader."— Brooklyn Eagle. Third edition. 12mo, $1.50.

By ALLAN MCAULAY

The Rhymer

“A

SCOTTISH tale of real delicacy and true feeling. Alison, the heroine, is a rare character, firm

but loving, womanly and sweet. Robert Burns appears as one of the actors in the story and plays a part not very creditable, but quite consonant with his known personal history.”The Outlook. Second edition. 12mo, $1.50.

By RICHARD HOLBROOK

Boys and Men

T is the peer of any college story ever written.

, a college story rely for ing scenes. In this the author of Boys and Men' has succeeded splendidly. His pictures of college life are intensely vivid. It is a pleasure to repeat that ‘Boys and Men' is a college story that will be hard to surpass."-Boston Journal. Second edition. 12mo, $1.25.

By A. T. QUILLER-COUCH

The Ship of Stars

“MR.

FR. QUILLER-COUCH is in all that he writes an artist, and it is good to get a book as well written

as is 'The Ship of Stars.' A pleasant, wholesome story this, full of the salt-bracing air of the Cornish coast."-New York Sun. 12mo, $1.50.

By JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS

The Chronicles of Aunt Minervy Ann

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a fine companion-piece to Mr. Page's exquisitely sympathetic portraitures."—New York Times. Profusely illustrated by A. B. Frost. 12mo, $1.50. king Noanett

On Trial By F. J. STIMSON. New edition.

By ZACK, Author of “Life is Life.” 12mo, $1.00.

12mo, $1.50. "ON

NE of the best American novels yet written, not only from a literary point of view, but

T seems impossible that this simple story of "I

Devonshire folk should fail to arouse enthufrom its close adherence to historical facts and its siam among students of good fiction. Its inspira. faithful representation of early Colonial life. tion is so ample, vigorous, and fresh, and its A modern American classic.”_Boston Transcript. execution so masterly free."— The Academy. In Connection with

Hed Kock
The De Willoughby Claim

By THOMAS NELSON PAGE. By FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT.

84th Thousand. Illustrated by Clinedinst. 45th Thousand. 12mo, $1.50.

12mo, $1.50. “I IT subile, tragic performance, lays a tremendous

IT is team tribecause it dealiserature because it hold upon the reader's sympathies." —Boston Herald. matic period in American history."— The Outlook.

"

SONS, Publishers, New York

SCRIBN E R'S NEW BOOKS

OUT-OF. DOOR

BOOKS

Enlarged, Rewritten and Entirely Reset

HOW TO KNOW
THE WILD

WILD FLOWERS
By MRS. WILLIAM STARR DANA
With 48 Colored Plates and New Black and White Drawings

A Guide to the Names, Haunts, and Habits of our Common Wild Flowers. With 48 full-page colored plates by Elsie LOUISE SHAw, and 110 full-page illustrations by MARION SATTERLEE. both Thousand. Crown 800, $2.00 net. “No popular work on botany has ever achieved such universal and deserved popularity as this volume

of Mrs. Dana's. To those who love wild flowers it has proved a treasure, and with the additions now made it will be of yet greater value. One of the specially valuable features of the book is that it gives the common or popular name of the plants and Powers as well as the scientific terms."

- Boston Transcript.

With 144

HOW TO KNOW THE FERNS

By FRANCES THEODORA PARSONS (Mrs. Dana)

A Guide to the Names, Haunts, and Habits of our Native Ferns. full-page illustrations, and 6 full-page illustrations from photographs. Crown 800, $1.50 net. « THIS gifted and enthusiastic naturalist knows the ferns literally "like a book,' and lier book makes the first lesson of the novice in the lore of fern-life an easy and a delightful task."

-New York Mail and Express.

OUR NATIVE TREES
And How to Identify Them

By HARRIET L. KEELER With 178 full-page illustrations from photographs, and with 162 illustrations from drawings. Crown 8vo, $2.00 net. · THE plan of the book must be heartily commended. No admirer of trees should be without it, and

if you go away into the country for even a short stay, and care to know-as you should careanything about our native trees you will find this volume an invaluable guide. One could bring home from a walk a collection of leaves, and then, with the aid of the illustrations in this book, identify them all. Then you will know those trees the next time you encounter them, and they will take on a new interest and meaning to your eyes. Surely 'thy state is the more gracious' for such knowledge.”- Brooklyn Eagle.

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