The Metric System Explained and Adapted to the Systems of Instruction in the United States

Front Cover
A. S. Barnes, 1867 - 20 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - That the tables in the schedule hereto annexed shall be recognized in the construction of contracts and in all legal proceedings as establishing in- terms of the weights and measures now in use in the United States: the equivalents of the weights and measures expressed therein in terms of the metric system...
Page 5 - That from and after the passage of this act, it shall be lawful throughout the United States of America to employ the weights and measures of the metric system ; and no contract, or dealing, or pleading in any court, shall be deemed invalid, or liable to objection, because the weights or measures expressed or referred to therein are weights or measures of the metric system.
Page 6 - Postmaster-General be, and he is hereby authorized and directed to furnish to the post-offices exchanging mails with, foreign countries, and to such other offices as he shall think expedient, postal balances denominated in grams of the Metric System ; and until otherwise provided by law, one-half ounce avoirdupois shall be deemed and taken for postal purposes as the equivalent of fifteen grams of the metric weights, and so adopted in progression ; and the rates of postage shall be applied accordingly.
Page 6 - Be it resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to furnish to each State, to be delivered to the governor thereof, one set of the standard weights and measures of the metric system for the use of the States, respectively.
Page 5 - THE USE OF THE METRIC SYSTEM OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That from and after the...
Page 6 - OF hereby, authorized and directed to furnish to the post-offices exchanging mails with foreign countries, and to such other offices as he shall think expedient, postal balances denominated in grams, of the metric system, and until otherwise provided by law, one-half ounce avoirdupois shall be deemed and taken for postal purposes as the equivalent of fifteen grams of the metric weights, and so adopted in progression ; and the rates of postage shall be applied accordingly.
Page 5 - Commons approving a compulsory measure, and . the subsequent enactment of a permissive la\v, must be regarded as evincing a deliberate intention to introduce the Metric System into England, and as giving up any purpose of creating a separate system founded upon the yard, the foot, or the inch ; and as paving the way for the ultimate exclusive adoption of the metric scheme. " The general consent of so many nations, highly enlightened, and deeply interested in the promotion of trade, and in popular...
Page 3 - ... agreeing to introduce into the several States systems of which the meter should be the basis. Prussia, which had previously withheld assent, thus appears to join in the common movement. Switzerland will necessarily follow Germany, and already has units that are aliquot parts of the meter and the kilogram. The King of Sweden and Norway has appointed a commission to consider and report on the best mode of introducing the Metric System among his subjects. Denmark may be expected to follow the recommendation...
Page 4 - Commons was appointed to consider the practicability of adopting a simple and uniform system of Weights and Measures, with a view not only to the benefit of our internal trade, but to facilitate our trade and intercourse with foreign countries.
Page 8 - METER, and is equal to 39.37 inches, very nearly. The change from the base, in all the denominations, is according to the decimal scale of tens : that is, the units increase ten times, at each step, in the ascending scale, and decrease ten times, at each step, in the descending scale. MEASURES OF LENGTH.

Bibliographic information