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Civil War, and that the wise counsels of the great statesman will become

“a light to guide, a rod
To check the erring, and reprove.”

Thirdly, no editors could study the controversial and argumentative work of Lincoln without increased admiration for its clearness and cogency. Since we have felt the need in our own classrooms of good material for illustrating the merits and the defects of argument, we have printed the first Lincoln-Douglas debate (omitting Douglas's second speech), and have analyzed the arguments of both speakers in series of questions. Douglas's speech illustrates almost every fallacy of reasoning, every impudence, every trick of the public platform; Lincoln's speeches show a sound argumentative method combined with a shrewd understanding of what stirs the sympathy and warms the blood of honest men. By study of the debate, by a further study of the Cooper Union Speech and the Bloomington Speech, the student will come to recognize Lincoln's title to admiration.

Permission has been given by G. P. Putnam's Sons for the use of selections and citations from the set of Lincoln's works edited by Lapsley and G. H. Putnam. We are indebted to Mr. D. C. French for permission to use a photograph of his statue of Lincoln ; also to Gutzon Borglum for permission to use photographs of two of his statues.

ILLUSTRATIONS :

PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN AT THE TIME OF LINCOLN'S COOPER

INSTITUTE ADDRESS IN 1860 . . . Frontispiece LINCOLN IN 1860 . . . . . . . . 60 STATUE OF LINCOLN BY DANIEL C. FRENCH, WASHING

TON, D. C. . . . . . . . . 112 LINCOLN AND His Son, “Tad” . . . . . 150 STATUE OF LINCOLN BY Gutzon Borglum, NEWARK, N. J. 190 BUST OF LINCOLN BY GUTZON BORGLUM, WASHINGTON,

D. C. . . . . . . . . . 220

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SELECTIONS FROM THE WORKS

OF

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

SHORT AUTOBIOGRAPHY WRITTEN AT THE

REQUEST OF A FRIEND TO USE IN PRE-
PARING A POPULAR CAMPAIGN BIOG-
RAPHY IN THE ELECTION OF 1860

ABRAHAM LINCOLN was born February 12, 1809, then in Hardin, now in the more recently formed county of LaRue, Kentucky. His father, Thomas, and grandfather, Abraham, were born in Rockingham County, Virginia, whither their ancestors had come from Berks County, Pennsylvania. His lineage has been traced no farther back than this. The family were originally Quakers, though in later times they have fallen away from the peculiar habits of that people. The grandfather, Abraham, had four brothers — Isaac, Jacob, John, and Thomas. So far as known, the descendants of Jacob and John are still in Virginia. Isaac went to a place near where Virginia, North Carolina, and Tennessee join; and his descendants are in that region. Thomas came to Kentucky, and after many years died there, whence his descendants went to Missouri. Abraham, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, came to Kentucky, and was killed by Indians about the year 1784. He left a widow, three sons, and two daughters. The eldest son Mordecai, remained in Kentucky till "late in life, when he removed to Hancock County, Illinois, where soon after he died, and where several of his descendants still remain. The second son, Josiah, removed at an early day to a place on Blue River, now within Hancock County, Indiana, but no recent information of him or his family has been obtained. The eldest sister, Mary, married Ralph Crume, and some of her descendants are now known to be in Breckinridge County, Kentucky. The second sister, Nancy, married William Brumfield, and her family are not known to have left Kentucky, but there is no recent information from them. Thomas, the youngest son, and father of the present subject, by the early death of his father and very narrow circumstances of his mother, even in childhood was a wandering laboring-boy, and grew up literally without education. He never did more in the way of writing than to bunglingly write his own name. Before he was grown he passed one year as a hired man with his uncle Isaac on Watauga, a branch of the Holston River. Getting back into Kentucky, and having reached his twentyeighth year, he married Nancy Hanks — mother of the present subject — in the year 1806. She also was born in Virginia; and relatives of hers of the name of Hanks, and of other names, now reside in Coles, in Macon, and in Adams counties, Illinois, and also in Iowa. The present subject has no brother or sister

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