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ADOPTED BY THE GOVERNMENTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND GREAT
BRITAIN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE DECISION OF THE

TRIBUNAL OF ARBITRATION CONVENED AT PARIS,

WITH

OTHER INFORMATION CALLED FOR BY SAID RESOLUTION.

WASHINGTON:
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.

1895.

3d Session.

No. 67.

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES.

MESSAGE

FROM THE

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,

IN RESPONSE TO

Senate resolution of January 8, 1895, transmitting information relating

to the enforcement of the regulations respecting fur seals, adopted by the Governments of the United States and Great Britain in accordance with the decision of the Tribunal of Arbitration convened at Paris, with other information called for by said resolution.

FEBRUARY 11, 1895.-Read, referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations, and

ordered to be printed.

To the Senate:

On the 8th day of January I received a copy of the following Senate resolution:

Resolred, That the President be requested, if not incompatible with the public interests, to communicate to the Senate all reports, documents, and other papers, including logs of vessels, relating to the enforcement of the regulations respecting for seals adopted by the Governments of the United States and Great Britain in accordance with the decision of the Tribunal of Arbitration convened in Paris and the resolution (regulations?) under which said reports are required to be made, as well as relating to the number of seals taken during the season of 1894, by pelagic hunters and by the lessees of the Pribilof and Commander islands; also, relating to the steps which may have been taken to extend the said regulations to the Asiatic waters of the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea, and to secure the concurrence of other nations in said regulations; and further, all papers not heretofore published, includiug communications of the agent of the United States before said tribunal at Paris, relating to the claims of the British Government on account of the seizure of the sealing vessels in Bering Sea.

In compliance with said request I herewith transmit sundry papers, documents, and reports which have been returned to me by the Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, and the Secretary of the Navy, to whom said resolution was referred. I am not in possession of any further information touching the various subjects embodied in such resolution.

It will be seen from a letter of the Secretary of the Navy, accompanying the papers and documents sent from his Department, that it is impossible to furnish at this time the complete log books of some of the naval vessels referred to in the resolution; but I venture to express the hope that the reports of the commanders of such vessels herewith submitted will be found to contain in substance so much of the matters recorded in said log books as are important in answering the inquiries addressed to me by the Senate.

GROVER CLEVELAND. EXECUTIVE MANSION,

February 11, 1895.

To the PRESIDENT:

The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the resolution adopted by the Senate on the 8th ultimo, requesting the President, if not incompatible with the public interests, to communicate to the Senate all reports, documents, and other papers, including logs of vessels, relating to the enforcement of the regulations respecting fur seals adopted by the Governments of the United States and Great Britain, in accordance with the decision of the Tribunal of Arbitration convened at Paris, and the resolution (regulations ?) under wbich said reports are required to be made, as well as relating to the number of seals taken during the season of 1894 by pelagic hunters and by the lessees of the Pribilof and Commander islands; also relating to the steps which may have been taken to extend the said regulations to the Asiatic waters of the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea, and to secure the concurrence of other nations in said regulations, and further, all papers not heretofore published, including communications of the agent of the United States before said tribunal at Paris, relating to the claims of the British Government on account of the seizure of the sealing vessels in Bering Sea, has the honor to lay before the President copies of all reports, documents, and other papers found of record in the Department of State relating to the subjects embraced in the resolution. Respectfully submitted.

W. Q. GRESHAM. DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, February 6, 1895.

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1893.

1 Sir Julian Pauncefote to Mr. Aug. 22 Lord Rosebery proposes to lay before Parliament

Gresham (telegram).

Bering Sea award.

2 Mr. Gresham to Sir Jnlian Aug. 22 Sees no reason why award should not be laid be-

Pauncefote (telegram).

fore Parliament.

3 Mr. Gresham to Mr. Bayard Sept. 12 Relative to immediate adoption of regulations.

(telegram).

Concurrent legislation before next sealing sea.

son indispensable. If no seals to be killed on

land, concurrence of Russia should be had if

possible.

4 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Gresham. Sept. 13 Has asked for an interview with secretary of

state for foreign affairs to lay before him neces.

sity of proceeding without delay to agree upon

the regulations:

5 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Gresham. Sept. 13 Had interview with secretary of state for foreign

affairs. Expressed his willingness to act

promptly. Suggests British ambassador emi.
uently qualified to conduct arrangements on
behalf of his Government. Lord Rosebery wait.

ing for a letter from Sir Charles Tupper.

6. Mr. Gresham to Mr. Bayard. Sept. 13 Regulations should be agreed upon and orders

issued before next sealing season begins, in

order to inake award effective. Fears Cana-

dians and Americans will transfer ownership

of vessels to citizens or subjects of other pow.

ers, avoiding the effect of regulations. Sug.

gests speaking to Lord Rosebery on this point,

and also as to how other powers are to be ap.

proached for their adhesion to the regulations.

7 | Mr. Gresham to Mr. Bayard Sept. 16 Suggests propriety of his endeavoring to obtain an

(telegram).

agreement for carrying into effect the regula-

tions. Calls attention to the neccessity for

prompt action.

8 Yr. Gresham to Mr. Bayard. Sept. 19 Incloses copies of final decision of the Tribunal

of Arbitration with the recommendations made

by the tribunal to the two Governments.

9 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Gresham. Sept. 19 Sir Charles Tupper preparing a memorandum on

Bering Sea award, delayed by arrears of busi-

ness. Has every confidence that an effective

execution of the award will be greed upon in

a short time.

10 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Gresham Sept. 20 In an interview with Secretary of State for

(telegram).

Foreign Affairs to-day he fully responds to

President's wishes for prompt action in

executing Bering Sea award.

u Mr. Bayard to Mr. Gresham. Sept. 20 Interview with Lord Rosebery to-day; pressed

upon him importance of prompt and active co-

operation; he expressed his desire to cooperate.

He desires that Sir Julian Pauncefote should

be employed in carrying out the decisions and

recommendations of the tribunal on behalf of

Great Britain.

12 Mr. Bayard to Mr. Gresham. Sept. 30 Refers to temporary arrangement of May, 1893,

between Russia and Great Britain; limit of

30,000 seals agreed to on Russian islands; rea.

sonable figure to adopt for catch of Pribélof

Islands. Asks for expression of views on

restriction of seal catch on these islands.

13 Mr. Gresham to Mr. Bayard Oct. 3 Acknowledges No. 11. President still prefers

(telegram).

negotiations be conducted in London.

14 Mr.Gresham to Mr. Bayard. Oct. 6 Incloses copy of letter from Hon. E. J. Phelps

commenting on the award made by the arbitra-

tors, and of suggestions by Mr. James C. Car-

ter on certain branches of the subject.

15 Sir Julian Pauncefote to Oct. 11 Negotiations for carrying out award. Asks how

Mr. Gresham.

the wishes of the ininister for foreign affairs

that they be conducted in Washington will be

received

16 Mr. Gresham to Mr. Bayard. Oct. 18 Replies to No. 12, suspension of seal catch. The

President still adheres to his purpose of having

the negotiations conducted in London.

3

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