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adaptability for therapeutic use. Whether pepsin be prescribed with success or failure, depends on its quality. The physician prescribing pepsin should demand in his prescription a pepsin product which he has convinced himself is pure and active, and can be relied upon. By prolonged investigation of digestive ferments, the standard has been again and again advanced. It is annoụnced by Parke, Davis & Co. that they have succeeded in making a pepsin capable of digesting 4000 times its weight. of coagulated egg albumen under the conditions of the pharmacopæial test. The product is prepared by a new and original process, which renders it aseptic, free from odor, agreeable in taste to the most sensitive palate, and superior to any pepsin product hitherto made. In these days, when novices and pork-packers are flooding the market with pepsins, it behooves the careful physician to see that his prescriptions are filled by the product of some reputable manufacturing chemist.

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“I know I've got a vein of poetry in me, sir,” confidently asserted the young man to the editor, “and all I want is a chance to bring it out. What would you suggest, sir?”

“I think you had better see a doctor and have it lanced.”

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Twenty years ago very little was known about the isolation of pepsin and the other animal ferments, or their action. Today much is known, although much may remain to be discovered. One fact stands out clearly, however,-if the raw material for the preparation of these ferments is handled at the place of supply by skilled chemists, then pepsin and other ferments of much greater strength are obtained, and all disagreeable taste and odor, arising from decomposition, are avoided. The great packing firm of Armour & Company, Chicago, were the first to realize the advantage which freshness of material and early manipulation would give them over other pepsin manufacturers who buy material in Chicago and transport it by freight to their laboratories. By the aid of expert chemical talent, Armour & Company utilize their vast supply of raw material almost as soon as removed from the animal, the result being a line of digestive ferments unequaled by any in the market. “The pork packer in pepsin making marks a step in the march of progress, and is an indication of great import in the field of physiological chemistry.—Ex.

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HYDRASTIS IN OBSTETRICS.-Dr. Botti has found hydrastic canadensis, in daily dose of from one to two hundred drops, an excellent hemostatic in the uterine hemorrhage of childbirth, as well as in ante- and post-partum bleeding. He regards hydrastis as much superior to the secale preparations and free from their disagreeable effects.—Centralb. fur Gynakologie, No. 50.

We desire to call the attention of our readers to the new advertisement of Reed & Carnrick, on page 8. This firm has spared neither labor nor expense to perfect their infant foods in keeping qualities by sterilization and by placing them in hermetically sealed containers. They claim that LactoPreparata, an all-milk food, for young infants, and Carnrick's Food, composed of half Lacto-Preparata and half dextrinized wheat, for use after six months of age, have now practically reached perfection in keeping qualities, and that they are the only infant foods in the market that will alone thoroughly nourish a child during the nursing period. Their Lacto-Preparata almost perfectly resembles buman milk in character, composition and taste.

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Secondary syphilides of the mouth, Fournier says, form two groups, the moist syphilides and the dry syphilides. The first constitute mucous patches with their well-known various forms; the second, less well known, have received different names, such as syphylitic psoriasis, smooth plaques of the tongue, or ringworm-like syphilides.

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Wayne's Elixir was originated by Prof. E. S. Wayne, Cincinnati's leading chemist, formerly Professor of Chemistry in the Ohio Medical College, and Professor of Materia Medica in the Cincinnati College of Pharmacy. It has stood the test of experience, and has the indorsement of many of the leading physicians of this community. We feel confident that in all cases where such a diuretic is indicated, the profession will not be disappointed in its use. Samples will be cheerfully furnished any reputable physician for experiment by making application to the proprietor, as suggested in our advertising columns. All our readers should avail themselves of this opportunity to

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acquaint themselves with its merit. It is safe, pleasant and thoroughly reliable, and meets all the indications for a diuretic. Lancet Clinic.

*** Gallacetophenon is the name of a new remedy which Neucki has recently introduced, and which is said to be very efficacious in the treatment of psoriasis and parasitic skin diseases. It is said to be quite as active as pyrogallol, and does not have the disadvantage of staining.

J. T. Kilburn, M.D., of Trufant, Mich., says: “Have used Peacock's Bromides in my practice for some time, and I would not like to be without it; in fact, I do not know of anything that would take its place in nervous conditions.”

*** HEMORRHAGE FROM STOMACH OR BOWELS.—Tannic acid ten to fifteen grains if due to capillary oozing. If from typhoid fever or ulcer of the stomach, treat as for pulmonary hemorrhage.

Robinson’s Lime Juice and Pepsin is an excellent remedy in the gastric derangements particularly prevalent at this season. It is superior as a digestive agent to many other similar goods. (See advertisement.) See remarks on their Arom. Fluid Pepsin also.

For a case of epilepsy in a young man twenty-one years of age, in which the treatment by the mixed bromides showed no improvement, Professor Da Costa prescribed nitro-glycerin, one drop of a one per cent. solution, three times a day, the dose to be increased to five drops three times a day.—College and Clinical Record.

The Rio Chemical Company of St. Louis, if it had never done more than present to the profession its valuable Extract of Pinus Canadensis, would have placed the profession under a lasting obligation to it. There is no more healthful, stimulating, and generally beneficial application that can be made to a diseased mucous membrane than this.

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To check the secretion of milk, the application of a solution of camphor one part, in oil of turpentine six parts, has been recommended. Care must be taken to prevent injury to the skin, for such a mixture would irritate strongly if kept long in contact with the integument under an impermeable dressing.- Medical Record.

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N. A. Sackett, M.D., Ewing, Neb., says: Celerina I have tested in two cases of nervous headache. One case was a man of about 35 years of age, who has been subject to attacks for a number of years as often as every two weeks. I prescribed an ounce in two ounces of port wine, to take a teaspoonful four times a day. He has not had an attack since, although two months have elapsed. The other was a lady of about the same age, who has had similar attacks for the last five years. She has had no recurrence of the trouble since, and moreover she has passed two monthly periods without the usual dysmenorrhea, with which she is afflicted at that period. I shall continue to prescribe it in cases in which it is indicated, and will report more fully in future.

*** Pruritus vulvæ results, generally, either from a discharge from the uterus and vagina, from diabetes or from structural lesion of the vulva. Being an effect, the cause should be ascertained. For the local treatment, applications of a solution of bichloride of mercury will prove the most serviceable.—Godfrey, Times and Register.

J. W. Cokenower, A.M., M.D., Sec. Ia. State Med. Society, says: I take pleasure in recommending after ample experience the Elixir Three Chlorides, as producing the best alterative effect, especially in chronic syphilis and post-syphilitic cachexin.

Quinine pills and capsules are very insoluble, often being discharged undissolved. Febriline, or Tasteless Syrup of Quinine, has been found to be just as reliable in all cases as the bitter sulphate of quinine, and physicians will find it to their advantage to use it for adults, as well as children, in place of pills and capsules. It is as pleasant as lemon syrup and will be retained by the most delicate stomach, having also the advantage of not producing the unpleasant head symptoms of which so many patients complain after taking the quinine sulphate. Possessing these advantages, physicians will find it superior to the quinine sulphate for all cases requiring quinine, particularly typhoid fever patients.

Samples of Sander & Sons' Eucalypti Extract (Eucalyptol) gratis, through Dr. Sander, Dillon, Iowa. Eucalyptol stands foremost as a disinfectant and antiseptic. Meyer Bros. Drug Co., St. Louis, Mo., sole agents. Look for the genuine product.

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Lecturer on Physical Diagnosis University Medical College, Laryngologist to

All Saints and Missouri Pacific Hospitals. Mr. President, and Gentlemen of the Missouri State Medical AssociationTumors in the larynx consist of growths of several varieties, similar to those found in many other portions of the body. Intralaryngeal growths were thought rare in the prelaryngoscopic days, but since the laryngeal mirror has enabled the larynx to be easily examined, they are found to be of more frequent occurrence than was formerly thought. A large number of these are benign, and of these the most frequent are papillary or warty formations, which constitute about two-thirds of all laryngeal tumors. Though attached usually to the vocal cords, they may occur anywhere in the larynx.

As a rule they are sessile and multiple, and of various shades of dingy red; when removed are apt to recur, and may degenerate into malignant growths. Fibrous tumors are the next in frequency that are met, and are composed of more or less firmly intermatted bundles of fibrous tissue. They are usually pedunculated, and do not recur when removed. The con

* Read before Missouri State Medical Association, May 17, 1892.
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