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JK 2352 .1962

STATEMENT.

The purpose of this book is indicated by its title. It is a Republican Text-book and is believed to contain reliable statements of facts and official data regarding party policies and acts of administration dictated by these policies. The Congressional Committee has sought to make the matter here presented reliable beyond controversy and has gone to the official records that those who use it may state the facts.

The text-book is compiled from official reports that can readily be secured from the various Departments of the Government. Neither men nor parties can stand on their records alone, but such records are the best indication of their ability and readiness to carry out promises.

The following pages give a record of Republican Administration of the Government and the fidelity of that party to its pledges.

CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE.

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729-40

OF THE

196Republican Congressional

Committee, 1902

OFFICERS
Chairman-JOSEPH W BABCOCK, Wisconsin.
Vice-Chairman-JAMES S. SHERMAN, New York,
Secretary-JESSE OVERSTREET, Indiana.
Treasurer-Wm. B. THOMPSON, Washington, D. C.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
John A. T. Hull, of Iowa.

JOSEPH G. CANNON, of Illinois.
David H. MERCER, of Nebraska.

H. C. LOUDENSLAGER, of New Jersey,
C. A. RUSSELL, of Connecticut.

W. C. LOVERING, of Massachusetts.

William CONNELL, of Pennsylvania.

Victor H. METCALF, of California. E. C. BURLEIGH, of Maine.

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MEMBERS

California, V. H. Metcalf, Oakland.
Connecticut, C A. Russell, Killingly.
Delaware, L. H. Ball, Faulkland,
Illinois, J. G. Cannon, Danville.
Indiana, Jesse Overstreet, Ind anapolis.
lowa, J. A. T. Hull, Des Moines.
Kansas, J. M. Miller, Council Grove.
Kentucky, Vincent Boreing, London,
Maine, L. C. Burleigh, Augusta.
Maryland, Sidney E. Mudd, Platte.
Massachusetts, W. C. Lovering, Taunto.
Michigan, J. B, Corlis , Detroit.
Minnesota, J, T. Heatwole, Northfield.
Missouri, Richard Bartholdt, St. Louis.
Nebraska. D H. Mercer, Omaha,
Nevada, William M. Stewart, Carson City.
New Hampsh're, C. A. Sulloway Manchester
New Jersey, H. C. Loudenslager, Paulsboro.
New York, J. S. Sherman, Utica.

North Carolina, S. Blackburn, Wilkesboro.
North Dakota, Thomas F. Marshall, (akes.
Ohio, H. C. Van Voorhees, Zanesville.
Oregon, Thomas H. Tongue, Hillsboro.
Pennsylvania, William Connell, Scranton.
Rhode Island, Melville Bull, Middletown,
South Dakota, Carles H. Burk, Pierre.
Tennessee, H. R. Gibson, Knxville.
Utah. George Sutherland, Salt Lake City.
Vermont, Kittredge Has as, Brattlebor,
Washington, W. L. Jones, N. Yakima.
West Virginia, B. B. Dovener, Wheeling.
Wisconsin, J. W. Babcock, Necedah.
Wyoming, Frank W. Mondell, Newcastle.

TERRITORIES

Oklahoma, Dennis Flynn, Guthrie.
New Mexico, B. S. Rodey, Albuquerque.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

M. A. HANNA, CHAIRMAN, Cleveland, Ohio. P. S. HEATH, SECRETARY, Indiana. V. W. FOSTER, ASST. TREAS., linois. C. N. BLISS, TREASURER, New York E. F. BROWN, SUB-TREAS, Nlinois

GEO. N. WISWELL, SERGEANT-AT-ARMS, Wisconsin. Executive Committee, Chicago Executive Committee, New York. HENRY C. PAYNE of Wisconsin, Vice-Chairman JOSEPH H. MANLEY of Maine. PERRY S. HEATH of Indiana, Secretary

N. B. Scott of West Virginia. RICHARD C. KERENS of Missouri.

FRED S. GIBBS of New York. GRAEME STEWART of Illinois.

FRANKLIN MURPHY of New Jersey. HARRY S. New of Indiana.

CORNELIUS N. Bliss of New York.
GENERAL COMMITTEE
State
Name

P. O. Address
Alabama,
J. W. DEMMICK,

Montgomery
Arkansas, POWELL CLAYTON,

Eureka Springs and City of Mexice.
California,
W. C. VAN FLEET,

San Francisco.
Colorado,
A. M. STEVENSON,

Denver.
Connecticut, CHARLES F. BROOKER,

Ansonia.
Delaware,

JOHN EDWARD ADDICKS, Wilmington
Florida,
JOHN G. LONG,

St. Augus!me.
Georgia,
JUDSON W. LYONS,

Augusta and Washington, DC
Idaho,
D. W. STANDROD,

Pocattello.
Illinois,
GRAEME STEWART,

Chicago.
Indiana,
HARRY S. NEW,

Indianapolis.
Iowa,
ERNEST E. HART,

Council Bluff's
Kansas,
DAVID W. MULVANE,

Topeka.
Kentucky,
JOHN W. YERKES,

Danville and Washington, DC.
Louisiana,
LEWIS S. CLARK.

Patterson.
Maine,
JOSEPH H MANLEY,

Augusta.
Maryland,
Louis E. McCOMAS,

Hagerstown and Washington, D. C. Massachusetts, GEORGE V. L. MEYER,

boston.
Michigan,
JOHN W. BLODGETT,

Grand Rapids.
Minnesota,
THOMAS H. SHEVLIN,

Minneapolis.
Mississippi, H. C. TURLEY,

Natchez,
Missouri,
RICHARD C. KERENS,

St Louis.
Montana,
EDWARD L. BONNER,

Missoula.
Nebraska,
R. B, SCHNEIDER

Fremant
Nevada,

PATRICK L. FLANIGAN, Reno. New Hampshire, J. H. GALLINGER,

Concord and Washington, D. C. New Jersey, FRANKLIN T. MURPHY, Newark. New York, FREDERICK S. GIBBS,

New York. North Carolina, J. C. PRITCHARD

Marshall and Washington, D. C.
North Dakota, ALEXANDER MCKENZIE, Bismarck.
Ohio,
MYRON T. HERRICK,

Cleveland.
Oregon,
GEORGE A. STEEL,

Portland.
Pennsylvania, M. STANLEY QUAY,

Beaver. Rhode Island, CHARLES R. BRAYTON, Providence. South Carolina, J. G CAPERS,

Charleston, South Dakota, J. M. GREENE,

Chamberlain. Tennessee, WALTER P. BROWNLOW, M.C., Jonesboro and Washington D. C. Texas,

R. B. HAWLEY, M. C., Galveston and Washington, D. C. Utah, 0. J. SALISBURY,

Salt Lake City.
Vermont,
JAMES W. BROCK,

Montpelier.
Virginia,
GEORGE E. BOWDEN,

Norfolk.
West Virginia, N. B. SCOTT,

Wheeling and Washington, DC. Washington, GEORGE H. BAKER,

Goldendale.
Wisconsin,
HENRY C. PAYNE,

Milwaukee.
Wyoming, Willis D. VANDEVANTER, Cheyenne and IVashington, D. C.
Territories, District of Columbia and Hawaii
Alaska,
JOHN G. HEALDT,

Juneau.
Arizona,
W. M. GRIFFITH,

Tucson.
New Mexico,
SOLOMON LUNA,

Los Lunas.
Oklahoma,
WILLIAM GRIMES,

Kingfisver.
Indian Territory,

WILLIAM M. MELLETTE, Vinita.
"District Columbia, MYRON M. PARKER,

Washington.
Hawaii,
SAMUEL PARKER,

Honolmlu.

REPUBLICAN TEXT-BOOK, 1902.

-

THE REPUBLICAN PARTY.

EMBODIES ITS PRINCIPLES IN LAW AND EXECUTES THEIMI IN ADMINISTRATION.

“You do not have to guess what the Republican party will do. The whole world knows its purposes. It has embodied them in law and executed them in administration.” This was William McKinley's definition of the Republican party before he was elected President. It is true to-day by reason of his Administration, which closed with the tragedy at Buffalo that put the whole world in grief for the death of one man as never before known in history. The Republican party is to-day, as it has been for more than fifty years, the party of sturdy American principles, progressive and conservative, accomplishing what it advocates and advocating what best represents the ideals of the most progressive people in the whole world. The Republican party has never been influenced by hysterical impulse, but has resisted that tendency in its own ranks and withstood it in the assaults of its opponents. It had its origin not in revolutionary doctrine, but in the sober judgment of the people of the North, that compromise with slavery was no longer possible in the great territory of the West which was soon to be organized into States and have an equal part in the Union. The first Republican President was from the West, and nearly all Republican Presidents have been from the West, not excepting the present Chief Executive, who, as the child of New York, was early adopted by the West as a cowboy and hunter to make him as typically western as any of his predecessors. The Record of the Republican party is written in the amendments to the Constitution, substantially all the Federal statutes now in force, and the most remarkable period of progress the country has ever known. It is written also in the commercial invasion of Europe, in Cuba, where a new flag has appeared as a testimonial to the fidelity of this party to the cause of free government, in Hawaii, and Porto Rico, as new territories, in the Philippines, where civil government

is rapidly succeeding military rule, and in China, where President McKinley's policy led and controlled the armies of the world marching to the rescue of the besieged legations in Pekin. These historical indices of the impress on the world by the Government policies and commercial expansion of the American people may be fairly claimed as a part of the history of the Republican party, because they represent the purposes of this party—as “they have been embodied in law and executed in administration.” It may appear like a strong assertion to say that all the Federal laws now in force are the laws of the Republican party, but it is true, for by the codification and remodeling of old statutes and the enacting of others there is no Federal law now on the statute books that do not bear the impress of this party. The homestead laws, the labor laws, the tariff laws, and the laws relating to currency are all from the Republican party. It is the party that for nearly half a century has been responsible for the administration of the nation's affairs, and throughout its administration there has been progress. The one period when progress was stalled and the wheels appeared to turn backward was that four years from March 4, 1893, to March 4, 1897, when the Democratic party was in complete control, with a Democratic President, a Democratic Senate, and a Democratic House of Representatives. In that four-year period policies and laws that had proved beneficial were reversed and repealed and Democratic free-trade policies embodied in law and administration. The effort of the Republican party has since that time been to wipe out the effect and the causes of that mistake. The one great Democratic law then enacted has been repealed. It was the Wilson-Gorman tariff law, and it was repealed by the Dingley Act on July 24, 1897, at a special session of Congress, called by President McKinley for that express purpose. It is unnecessary to go into detail as to the work of the Republican party. It is the work of the National Government and the progress of the American people in the last forty years—the period of modern industrial development at home and commercial expansion abroad. Republican policies.—The first platform of the Republican party favored internal improvements, the prohibition of slavery and polygamy in the Territories and free Kansas. The second platform, adopted in 1860, reversed the policy of the Democrats not only as to the slavery question, but as to the policy it had generally maintained on the constitutional right to make internal improvements at the expense of the National Treasury. It laid down in that second platform principles of government which have guided it ever since, and assisted it in fostering and encouraging the most

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