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Cotton-Upland Middling

Cotton bags...
Calico.....
Cotton flannels..
Cotton thread..
Cotton yarns.
Denims..
Drillings..
Ginghams.
Hosiery (cotton).
Print cloths
Sheetings.
Shirtings
Tickings...

Avernge for cotton goods..

Per cent.

8.92 10.26 a 4.74

1.60 20.58 5.70 5.92 2.00

4.89 a 5.08

9.24 4.52 1.02 a.52 4.26

Wool...

Blankets (all wool).
Broadcloths..
Carpets...
Flannels.
Horse blankets (all wool).
Overcoatings (all wool).
Shawls.
Suitings
Underwear (all wool).
Women's dress goods (áll wool).
Worsted yarns..
Average for woolen goods...

a Decline.

36.83 13.33 38.39 12.97 18.03 21.04 21.45 20.09 19.48

8.31 45.61 40.19

23.54

MARKET VALUE OF FARM PRODUCTS IN 1896 AND 1901

WHEN MEASURED BY THE WHOLESALE PRICES OF

STAPLE ARTICLES. The farmer and stock raiser measures the value of his grain and stock not only by the amount of money he will receive per bushel or per 100 pounds, but also by the value of such articles as he must buy for use by his family or on the farm.

No official retail prices have been published for recent years, but the United States Department of Labor in its bulletin for March, 1902, published wholesale prices of the staple articles in general use. From this publication the following tables have been prepared, showing the value of corn, cattle, hogs, and dairy butter in 1896 and 1901, when measured by the value of other staple articles which the farmer must buy.

While these figures do not represent the actual purchasing power (as all the prices are wholesale), yet the figures shown for the two years, 1896 and 1901, are in practically the same proportion as retail prices would show,

Wheat in 1901 was 12.06 per cent higher than in 1896. Cotton in 1901 was 8.92 per cent higher than in 1896.

According to the reports of the Agricultural Department the corn crop is the most important farm product. The farm value of the 1900 corn crop was $177,328,523 greater than the combined farm values of wheat, oats, rye, barley, and buckwheat, and even with the short corn crop in 1901 the farm value of corn was $85,408,612 greater than the combined farm values of wheat, oats, rye, barley, and buckwheat. The census office shows the commercial value of the 1900 cotton crop as $515,828,431. The farm value of the 1900 corn crop lacked but $88,123,574 of equaling the combined value of the cotton and wheat crops of the same year.

Ten bushels of corn in 1896 was equal in value to 20.9 pounds of Rio coffee, while in 1901 it was equal to 76.9 pounds, or almost four times as much. In 1896 10 bushels of corn was equal in value to 56.9 pounds of granulated sugar, in 1901 equal to 98.4 pounds; in 1896 equal to 49.1 yards of calico, in 1901 to 99.4 yards; in 1896 equal to 54.7 yards of ginghams, in 1901 to 101.4 yards; in 1896 to 41.5 yards of Indian Head sheetings, in 1901 to 78.7 yards; in 1896 to 37.1 yards of Fruit of the Loom shirtings, in 1901 to 66.3 yards; in 1896 to 19 bushels of stove coal (anthracite), in 1901 to 32.2 bushels; in 1896 to 24.8 gallons of refined petroleum, in 1901 to 45.3 gallons; in 1896 to 95 pounds of 8-penny cut nails, in 1901 to 235 pounds; in 1896 to 88 pounds of 8-penny wire nails, in 1901 to 210 pounds. It must be borne in mind that these values are based on the average yearly prices of these articles and that comparatively little of the corn crop of 1901 reached the market before December, 1901. The prices for 1901 are largely for the big crop of 1900—2,105,102,000 bushels with a farm value of $751,220,000. The corn crop of 1901 was 1,552,519,891 bushels and the farm value $921,555,768.

The comparative values of cattle, hogs, and dairy butter presented in the tables which follow show wonderful increases and the exchange values of corn, cattle, and hogs during the present year are much greater than during 1901.

The tables are as follows:

But it is not possible ever to insure prosperity merely by law. Something for good can be done by law, and bad laws can do an infinity of mischief; but, after all, the best law can only prevent wrong and injustice and give to the thrifty, the far-seeing, and the hard-working a chance to exercise to the best advantage their especial and peculiar abilities.-Theodore Roosevelt, at Minneapolis, September 2, 1901.

Value of 10 bushels of corn in 1896 and 1901 when measured by the wholesale

prices of the following staple articles,
[Compiled from Bulletin No. 39, United States Department of Labor.]

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Coffee, Rio, No. 7..

pounds. 20.9 76.9 Sugar, granulated.

do... 56.9 98.4 Tea, Formosa, fine...

.do.. 10.0 17.4 Shoes, men's calf bal. Goodyear welt.

. pairs.. (a) Shoes, women's solid grain..

do. (c) (d) Calico, Cocheco prints....

yards..

49.1 99.4 Denims, Amoskeag.

do... 26.1 47.5 Drillings, brown, Pepperell.

.do. 45.0 84.9 Ginghams, Amoskeag...

..do... 54.7 101.4 Hosiery, men's cotton half hose, 160 needles.

.pairs.. 37

87 Overcoatings, chinchilla, cotton-warp, C. C. grade.

.yards.. 5.9 11.2 Sheetings, bleached, 10-4, Atlantic..

..do.... 15.2 26.8 Sheetings, brown.4-4 Indian head.

do.... 41.5 78.7 Sheetings, bleached, 4-4, Fruit-of-the-Loom...

do.... 37.1

66.3 Suitings, indigo blue, all wool, 54-inch, Middlesex..

.do...

2.3

4.2 Tickings, Amoskeag, A.C. A.

.do.... 25.3 49.1 Women's dress goods, cashmere, cotton-warp, 22-inch, Hamilton,

yards.. 36.3 65.4 Coal, anthracite, stove..

.. bushels.. 19.0 82.2 Petroleum, refined, 150° test

.gallons.. 24.8

45.3 Nails, cut, 8-penny, fence and common..

pounds.. 95 235 Nails, wire, 8-penny, fence and common

.do...

88 210 Carbonate of lead (white lead), American, in oil.

..do.. 49.9 86.3 Cement, Portland, American.

barrels.. 1.3 2.6 Plate glass, area, 3 to 5 square feet.

.square feet. 7.6 15.5 Glassware, tumblers, 13-pint, common...

172 331 a l and 18 cents over.

b 2 and 37 cents over. c3 and 3 cents over.

d 5 and 70 cents over. Value of cattle (good to ext'a steers) per 100 pounds in 1896 and 1901 when

measured by the wholesale prices of the following staple articles.
[Compiled from Bulletin No. 39, United States Department of Labor.]

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Coffee, Rio, No. 7.

pounds.. Sugar, granulated. Tea, Formosa, fine..

..do. Shoes, men's calf bal. Goodyear welt.

.pairs.. Shoes, women's solid grain..

.do. Calico, Cocheco priuts...

.yards.. Denims, Amoskeag..

.do.. Drillings, brown, Pepperell..

..do. Ginghams, Amoskeay..

.do. Hosiery, men's cotton half hose, 160 needies..

pairs.. Overcoatings, chinchilla, cotton-warp, C. C. grade.. -yards.. Sheetings, bleached, 10-4, Atlantic..

...do... Sheetings, brown, 4-4, Indian head..

..do.. Shirtings, bleached, 4-4, Fruit-of-the-Loom

.do.. Suitings, indigo blue, all wool, 54-inch, Middlesex.

.do.. Tickings, Amoskeag, A.C. A.

do... Women's dress goods, cashmere, cotton-warp, 22-inch, Hamilton......

..yards.. Coal, anthracite, stove.

.bushel.. Petroleum, refined, 150° test.

.gallons.. Nails, cut, 8-penny, fence and common

pounds.. Nails, wire, 8-penny, fence azd common

..do... Carbonate of lead (wbite lead), American, in oil..

.do.... Cement, Portland, American.

barrels.. Plate glass, area, 3 to 5 square feet..

.square feet. Glassware, tumblers, 43-pint, common

84.4 44.9 77.4 93.9

64 10.2 26.1 71.3 63.7

3.9 43.5

117.1

56.0 100.1 119.5 102 13.2 31.6 92.8 78.1

4.9 57.8

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a 1 and $2.03 over.
c 5 and 18 cents over.

b 2 and $1.26 over.
d 6 and 73 cents over.

Valu of hogs (heavy) per 100 pounds in 1896 and 1901 when measured by the

wholesale prices of the following staple articles.
[Compiled from Bulletin No. 39, United States Department of Labor.]

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Coffee, Rio, No. 7...

.pounds.. Sugar, granulated..

.do.... Tea, Formosa, fine..

do... Shoes, men's calf bal. Goodyear welt

..pairs.. Shoes, women's solid grain

do.... Calico, Cocheco prints..

yards.. Denims, Amoskeag

do. Drillings, brown, Pepperell

.do. Ginghams, Amoskeag

do. Hosiery, men's cotton half hose, 160 needles

.pairs.. Overcoatings, chinchilla, cotton-warp, C. C. grade.... yards.. Sheetings, bleached, 10-4, Atlantic..

do.... Sheetings, brown, 44, Indian head.

do.... Shirtings, bleached, 4-4, Fruit-of-the-Loom.

do.... Suitings, indigo blue, all wool, 54-inch, Middlesex..

.do.. Tickings, Amoskeag, A.C. A.

do.... Women's dress goods, cashmere, cotton-warp, 22-inch, Ham, ilton...

..yards.. Coal, anthracite, stove

.bushels.. Petroleum, refined, 150° test

gallons.. Nails, cut, 8-penny, fence and common..

pounds.. Nails, wire, 8-penny, fence and common..

do... Carbonate of lead (white lead), American, il...

do.. Cement, Portland, American.

barrels.. Plate glass, area, 3 to 5 square feet.

.square feet. Glassware, tumblers, -pint, common

64.0
34.0
58.6
71.1

48
7.7
19.8
54.0
48.2

3.0 33.0

92.2 118.0

20.9 (6).

7 119.2

57.0 101.8 121.6 104 13.4 32.2 94.4 79.4

5.0 58.8

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Value of 20 pounds of butter (New York State dairy) in 1896 and 1901 when

measured by the wholesale prices of the following staple articles.
[Compiled from Bulletin No. 39, United States Department of Labor.]

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Coffee, Rio, No. 7..

pounds.. Sugar, granulated ...

do..... Tea, Formosa, fine ...,

.do.... Shoes, men's calf bal. Goodyear welt

.pairs.. Shoes, women's solid grain..

do. Calico, Cocheco prints.

yards.. Denims, Amoskeag

.do. Drillings, brown, Pepperell..

.do... Ginghams, Amoskeag

.do. Hosiery, men's cotton half hose, 160 needles.

.pairs.. Overcoatings, chinchilla, cotton-warp, C. C. grade.. .yards.. Sheetings, bleached, 10-4, Atlantic.

do.... Sheetings, brown, 4-4, Indian head..

do.... Shirtings, bleached, 4-4, Fruit-of-the-Loom..

.do.... Suitings, indigo blue, all wool, 54-inch, Middlesex.

đo... Tickings, Amoskeag, A.C. A.

.do. Women's dress goods, cashmere, cotton-warp: 22-inch, Hamilton.....

..yards.. Coal, anthracite, stove..

.bushels. Petroleum, refined, 150° test.

.gallons.. Nails, cut, 8-penny, fence and common.

pounds.. Nails, wire, 8-penny, fence and common.

.do.. Carbonate of lead (white lead), American, in oil.

.do. Cement, Portland, American.'

.barrels. Plate glass, area, 3 to 5 square feet

.square feet.. Glassware, tumblers, 13-pint, common

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When the comparative value of silver is shown the decrease is remarkable. The value in 1901 is less than in 1896, when measured by 21 of the 25 articles. In 1896 the value of 10 ounces of silver was equal to 150.5 pounds of granulated sugar, in 1901 it was equal to but 118,3 pounds; in 1896 equal to 144.5 yards of ginghams, in 1901 to 121.8 yards; in 1896 equal to 109.6. yards of Indian Head sheetings, in 1901 to 94.6 yards; in 1896 equal to 50.3 bushels of stove coal (anthracite), in 1901 to but 38.7 bushels.

The table follows:

Value of 10 ounces of silver (fine bar) in 1896 and 1901 when measured by the

wholesale prices of the following staple articles.
[Compiled from Bulletin No. 39, United States Department of Labor.]

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Coffee, Rio, No. 7

pounds.. Sugar, granulated

do.. Tea, Formosa, fine.

.do. Shoes, men's calf bal. Goodyear welt

.pairs.. Shoes, women's solid grain..

.do... Calico, Cocheco prints.

.yards.. Denims, Amoskeag

do.. Drilings, brown, Pepperell.

..do. Ginghams, Amoskeag. Hosiery, men's cotton half hose, 160 needles

.pairs.. Overcoatings, chinchilla, cotton-warp, C. C. grade.. .yards.. Sheetings, bleached, 10-4, Atlantic.

.do.... Skeetings, brown, 4-4, Indian head

.do.. Shirtings, bleached, 4-4, Fruit-of-the-Loom

.do.. Suitings, indigo blue, all wool, 54-inch, Middlesex.

.do.. Tickings, A moskeag, A. C. A.

do.. Women's dress goods, cashmere, cotton-warp, 22-inch, Hamilton,

...yards.. Coal, anthracite, stove

bushels.. Petroleum, refined, 150° test

..gallons.. Nails, cut, 8-penny, fence and common.

ounds.. Nails, wire, & penny, fence and common.,

...do... Carbonate of lead (white lead), American, in oil.

do... Cement, Portland, American..

barrels.. Plate glass, area, 3 to 5 square feet

.square feet.. Glassware, tumblers, 48-pint, common.

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It is not a good time for the liberator to submit important questions concerning liberty and government to the liberated while they are engaged in shooting down their rescuers.-President McKinley, at Boston, February 16, 1899.,

American wage-workers work with their heads as well as their hands. Moreover, they take a keen pride in what they are doing; so that, independent of the reward, they wish to turn out a perfect job. This is the great secret of our success in competition with the labor of foreign countries.-President Roosevelt, in message to Congress, December 3, 1901.

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