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us now, because this is no mere party contest. There is a contest for the fundamental principles of American life, for orderly liberty, for decency, honor and that virile patriotism which sees in the flag a symbol of national greatness, and wishes to uphold it in the face of the nations of mankind. A singular thing in connection with this campaign is the attitude of the very few people who, having opposed Bryan four years ago, are now supporting him, although he represents every principle which they then condemned. Mr. Bourke Cochran, for instance, used four years ago stronger language than I would use now. Thus, if you will turn to the New York World, of October 30, 1896, you will see that when an attempt was made to break up a meeting which he was addressing, Mr. Cockran said: 'Bryan and the crowd of lunatics and ruffians who follow him illustrate their platform, which stands for anarchy and riot!' Personally, I should not use the phraseology which Mr. Cockran is reported to have employed, but the thought was true then, and is equally true now. The Kansas City platform, and those who uphold it, stands for the forces of disorder and of National dishonesty, and here, in this State, for the forces of civic dishonesty as well, and when such is the case, we have the right to appeal for the support of every true American.”

At Hornellsville, there was a parade of clubs, and the Governor made a speech at the Opera House, saying: “Mr. Bryan is now inclined to laugh at the doctrine of the full dinner pail. Nobody laughed about it four years ago. It is a mighty sight easier to laugh about it when it is full than when it is empty. The only chance Mr. Bryan has is in that queer forgetfulness which people have when they are well off. When a man is well off, he is very apt to be willing to take chances. When he is badly off, then he is more careful.”

The Governor was a very hard worked man in New York, making speeches in four score villages and in fifteen cities; the latter, New York, Newburg, Kingston, Syracuse, Watertown, Owego, Rochester, Geneva, Niagara Falls, North Tonawanda, Buffalo, Lockport, Jamestown, Binghamton and Schenectady. In all he must have addressed 500,000 people, and double that number of New Yorkers saw him. The Governor also, everywhere in the State, by his speeches and presence, increased the interest in the Republican canvass. Wherever he traveled, Republican leaders testified to additional strength imparted to the Republican campaign by his tour. After his car was stoned at Waverly, Trogo and Owego, and having in mind his own experience of ruffianism, he said: "Mr. Bryan, by his appeals to class feeling; and Mr. Croker and Senator Jones, by the advice to Democrats to take possession of the polls if dissatisfied with the announcement of the result of the count of ballots, were inciting riot."

Mr. McCullagh, State Superintendent of Elections for the Metropolitan District, addressed communications to the Board of Police, and Chief of Police,

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the Deputy Chief of Police, the Inspectors of Police and to the Mayor, saying he knew of plots made by the lawless element in many election districts to intimidate legal voters at the polls, and to harass them in various violent ways in exercising the franchise. He called on the police, therefore, to enforce the law concerning the closing of liquor saloons on election day, as those places form rallying grounds for these ruffians. He also called on the police to defend the voters from rowdyism. .

On the evening of the 5th, the eve of the election, Mr. Waldron, one of the Governor's messengers, hastened to the city from Oyster Bay, bearing a personal letter from the Governor to the Mayor. He went to the Fifth Avenue Hotel, and asked for the aid of one of the employees of the Republican State Committee there in hunting for Mayor Van Wyck. The nature of the communication which he carried was not divulged at the hotel, but one of the employees at State Headquarters, who knew Mayor Van Wyck by sight, volunteered to help Mr. Waldron find the Mayor. They found the Mayor at the Democratic Club about 9 o'clock. The Mayor walked into the reception room to meet them, and there Mr. Waldron handed to him the Governor's letter. The Mayor broke the seal and read the following:

“State of New York,

“Oyster Bay, November 5, 1900. "To the Mayor of the City of New York:

"Sir :—My attention has been called to the official order issued by Chief of Police Devery, in which he directs his subordinates to disregard the Chief of the State Election Bureau, John McCullagh, and his deputies. Unless you have already taken steps to secure the recall of this order, it is necessary for me to. point out that I shall be obliged to hold you responsible as the head of the city government for the action of the Chief of Police, if it should result in any breach of the peace and intimidation or any crime whatever against the election laws. The State and city authorities should work together. I will not fail to call to summary account either State or city authority in the event of either being guilty of intimidation or connivance at fraud or of failure to protect every legal voter in his rights. I therefore hereby notify you that in the event of any wrong-doing following upon the failure immediately to recall Chief Devery's order, or upon any action or inaction on the part of Chief Devery, I must necessarily call you to account.

"Yours, etc.,

“THEODORE ROOSEVELT." There were also duly delivered the letters following to the Sheriff and District Attorney.

Letter to the Sheriff of New York County relative to the order of the Chief of Police to disregard State Election Bureau;

“State of New York,

"Oyster Bay, November 5, 1900. "To the Sheriff of the County of New York:

“Sir:—My attention has been called to the official order issued by Chief of Police Devery, in which he directs his subordinates to disregard the Chief of the State Election Bureau, John McCullagh, and his deputies. It is your duty to assist in the orderly enforcement of the law, and I shall hold you strictly responsible for any breach of the public peace within your county, or for any failure on your part to do your full duty in connection with the election tomorrow.

Yours truly,

“THEODORE ROOSEVELT.” Letter to the District Attorney of New York County relative to the order of the Chief of Police to disregard State Election Bureau:

“State of New York,

"Oyster Bay, November 5, 1900. "To the District Attorney of the County of New York:

“Sir:—My attention has been called to the official order issued by Chief of Police Devery in which he directs his subordinates to disregard the Chief of the State Election Bureau, John McCullagh, and his deputies.

"In view of this order, I call your attention to the fact that it is your duty to assist in the orderly enforcement of the law, and there must be no failure on your part to do your full duty in the matter.

“Yours truly,

“THEODORE ROOSEVELT.” The letters have the ring of cold steel, bearing an edge, in a hand that would smite. It is said "a frown settled on the Mayor's face as he read his letter,” and when the Governor's messenger asked the Mayor whether he desired to send a reply to the Governor, he gruffly said, “No, no,” and left the messenger abruptly, "to take counsel with Croker and Carroll.” As the Mayor was going, he was asked whether he would make a statement, and answered, “No, not a word.”

Mr. Carroll would not talk about the Governor's letter. Mr. Croker shut himself in his room upstairs, refusing to see newspaper men or answer their cards. Mr. Whalen said over the telephone that he knew nothing about the Governor's letter and could not talk about it. The Mayor was driven in a cab to police headquarters, where he arrived about 10 o'clock. He went into the office of Chief Devery fifteen minutes after the Chief had arrived in the building. The Mayor and Chief were closeted together for an hour, and no person was admitted or spoken to during that time. When the talk was ended, Chief

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