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STARTING CIVIL SERVICE REFORM.

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Very Interesting Testimony—Business Advantages Gained — Funny Questions and

Answers — The Conspicuous Lead of Roosevelt in the Crusade — Important Official

Letter from Him 65

CHAPTER VI.

WHEN POLICE COMMISSIONER.

His Fight for the Honor of New York City — Brief Statement of the Facts — Unwise

Legislation — Bi-Partizan Police Failure — The Blackmail Business—Morning Calls

on the Police — Dry Rot in Politics — A Brave Man's Great Good Work 81

CHAPTER VII.

Roosevelt's Sworn Rough Rider History.

His Talks under Oath to the Spanish War Investigation Commission — Thrilling Per-

sonal Narrative of Trouble and Triumph — How He Got into the Fight at Santi-

ago, and the Way It Was Won 91

CHAPTER VIII.

THE SANTIAGO BATTLES ASHORE.

Col. Roosevelt on the Fire Lines—Led the Way with His Volunteers — Official Re-

ports of Superior Officers and His Own — Going Home with the Sick — Important

Military Suggestions — Lessons of Actual Service 10a

CHAPTER IX.

THE ROUND ROBIN LETTER.

Secretary of War Alger and Colonel Theodore Roosevelt Differ Radically — The Full

Correspondence — The Rough Rider Was Tender Hearted, and Saved Thousands

of Sick Men — He Unbound the Army Tied in Fever Camps by Cutting the Red

Tape 116

CHAPTER X.

PRESIDENT'S PERSONAL EXPRESSIONS.

Kindly Views and Pleasant References — A Fighter, Not a Quarreler — Experiences

as Governor of New York Intensely Interesting as He Tells Them — Some of

His Vetoes—Sentences Good for Scrap-Books — Noble Passages from Orations —

Method of Public Speaking

CHAPTER XI.

SEEN IN HIS STUDIES AND IDEALS.

PAGE

Reflections of Himself in Writings and His Heroes — He Gives His Confidences in

Glowing Pages — Washington, Lincoln and Grant, Three Pre-eminently Great

Men — Aspirations Revealed in His Laudations — He Corrects a First Impression

— Loves Cowboys, but "There Are Others" — How He Became a Remote Ranch-

man— Anecdotes of Bravery and Generous Deeds 137

CHAPTER XII.

HOME AND ABROAD VIEW OF THE PRESIDENT.

American Competition in English Magazines about Americans — Some Errors of Eng-

land— "Articulate" Surroundings of Roosevelt — The Scorching Light upon Him

— Resemblance of "Theodore" to -'William" Traced by "Poultney" — Supple-

ment by Dr. Shaw — British Historian as an Expert Correspondent 146

CHAPTER XIII.

THE PRESIDENT'S ORATIONS.

Two of Them as Lofty Examples — The Famous "Strenuous Life" and "Manhood

and Statehood" — The Boldness with Which the President Expresses Himself—

The Literary Men of the World in Great Affairs 159

CHAPTER XIV.

HIS RISE IN LEADERSHIP.

Led to and from Cuba — Paints Enchanting Picture of the Island — From Santiago to

Albany—Vice-Presidential Notification of Nomination — Rough Rider Games at

Oklahoma — Picnic with Bryan at Chicago 178

CHAPTER XV.

PRESIDENT'S POLICY OF PROBLEMS.

A Study of Governor Roosevelt's Message to the Legislature of New York Covering

the Latest and Greatest Modern Questions,—Taxation, Restraint of Trusts, All

Phases of Labor Issues — Corporations, Municipal Ownership, the Boxing Law 191

CHAPTER XVI.

HIS IRON HAND.

New York as a "Free City" — "Tri-Insula" Policy Once Proposed — Roosevelt out

West — Encounters Roughs Who Were Not Riders — His Immense Campaign

Work — Striking Speeches Go to the Right Spot—Returns Home in Time to

Stamp upon Sedition — A Great Public Service—The Ruffians Ridden Down by

a Rough Rider with an Iron Hand 306
CHAPTER XVII.

THE SPECIAL TRAIN IN POLITICS.

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It Is an Agency That Serves to Make the People a Harmonious Nation — It Binds

the Union to Make the Nation a Neighborhood of States—Roosevelt's Campaign-

ing in New York and the West — Bryan's Competition — Roosevelt Fights to the

Finish — List of His Literary Works 223

CHAPTER XVIII.

RIDE FROM MOUNT MARCY.

From the Source of the Hudson to the Niagara River — How Roosevelt Came to be

on Mount Marcy When McKinley Died — Delay of Information and Rush from

the Adirondacks to Lake Erie — The Splendid Story of the Ride 334

CHAPTER XIX.

RELATIONS OF MCKINLEY AND ROOSEVELT.

The Twenty-Fifth President and His Predecessor's Policy—The Vice-President Suc-

ceeds to the Presidency — Roosevelt's Tributes to McKinley — The Message to

Congress an Example of Fitness 244

CHAPTER XX.

THE PRESIDENT AS A PEACEMAKER.

Auspicious Conditions at His Succession—Distinction from Vice-Presidents Gone

Before — Conservatism, Not Revolution — British Study of the Senate, with an

Erroneous Theory — The Senate Has Ratified an Isthmian Treaty with England

— Roosevelt Strong for Peace because His Word Stands—His Admirable Deport-

ment in Time of Trouble 261

CHAPTER XXI.

THE QUESTION OF RACE.

It Is the Bequest of Slavery—Roosevelt a President without Prejudice— Phases of

Racial Problem — The President's Oration on Frederick Douglass — Shall We

Amend the Constitution ?. 277

CHAPTER XXII.

ROOSEVELT IN THE WHITE HOUSE.

"Strenuous Life" There —First Night in President's Home —Dignity Need Not be

Tedious — Quickened Foot-Steps — The Functions of Luncheon — Busy Day—

Horseback Ride — The President upon a Gallop — New Year's Reception—Play

of the Children Pleases All 285

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