Pushing to the Front: Or, Success Under Difficulties; a Book of Inspiration and Encouragement to All who are Struggling for Self-elevation Along the Paths of Knowledge and of Duty

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Thomas Y. Crowell, 1894 - 312 pages
 

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Page 116 - But if you happen to have any learning, keep it a profound secret, especially from the men, who generally look with a jealous and malignant eye on a woman of great parts, and a cultivated understanding.
Page 50 - I am in earnest. I will not equivocate — I will not excuse — I will not retreat a single inch. AND I WILL BE HEARD.
Page 173 - Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them, in a great measure, the laws depend. The law touches us but here and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform, insensible operation, like that of the air we breathe in. They give their whole form and color to our lives. According to their quality, they aid morals, they supply them, or they totally destroy them.
Page 118 - They talk about a woman's sphere as though it had a limit; There's not a place in Earth or Heaven, There's not a task to mankind given. There's not a blessing or a woe. There's not a whispered yes or no. There's not a life, or death, or birth. That has a feather's weight of worth — Without a woman in it.
Page 119 - Do that which is assigned you, and you cannot hope too much or dare too much. There is at this moment for you an utterance brave and grand as that of the colossal chisel of Phidias, or trowel of the Egyptians, or the pen of Moses, or Dante, but different from all these.
Page 154 - Give a boy address and accomplishments, and you give him the mastery of palaces and fortunes where he goes. He has not the trouble of earning or owning them; they solicit him to enter and possess.
Page 259 - But strew his ashes to the wind Whose sword or voice has served mankind, — And is he dead, whose glorious mind Lifts thine on high? — To live in hearts we leave behind Is not to die.
Page 26 - There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune ; Omitted, all the voyage of their life Is bound in shallows, and in miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat; And we must take the current when it serves, Or lose our ventures.
Page 312 - If you would be pungent, be brief; for it is with words as with sunbeams — the more they are condensed the deeper they burn.
Page 231 - And when at last Wolfe had taken his leave, and his carriage was heard to roll from the door, Pitt seemed for the moment shaken in the high opinion which his deliberate judgment had formed of Wolfe; he lifted up his eyes and arms, and exclaimed to Lord Temple, "Good God! that I should have intrusted the fate of the country and of the administration to such hands!

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