Hurricane Andrew: Ethnicity, Gender, and the Sociology of Disasters

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Walter Gillis Peacock, Betty Hearn Morrow, Hugh Gladwin
Psychology Press, 1997 - 277 pages
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This book explores how social, economic and political factors set the stage for Hurricane Andrew by influencing who was prepared, who was hit the hardest, and who was most likely to recover. Employing unique research data the authors analyze the consequences of conflict and competition on disaster preparation, response and recovery, especially where associated with race, ethnicity and gender.

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Contents

1 DISASTER IN THE FIRST PERSON
1
TOWARD A SOCIOPOLITICAL ECOLOGY OF DISASTERS
20
THE SOCIOPOLITICAL ECOLOGY OF MIAMI
36
A NIGHT FOR HARD HOUSES
52
5 CRISIS DECISION MAKING AND MANAGEMENT
75
THE TENT CITIES
92
THE VOICES OF WOMEN
116
THE FAMILIES OF ANDREW
141
POSTHURRICANE RELOCATION
191
A NEGLECTED BLACK COMMUNITY
206
HURRICANE ANDREW AND THE RESHAPING OF MIAMI?
226
APPENDIX
243
Bibliography
251
Name index
268
Subject index
272
Copyright

9 ETHNIC AND RACIAL INEQUALITIES IN HURRICANE DAMAGE AND INSURANCE SETTLEMENTS
171

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