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If you be sincere, come to Félegyház. Till late in the evening, they rode on There, in the tavern, sits each morn- across the endless heath. No path ing a wrinkled old beggar, his grey was there, nor visible landmark; only hair tied up in two knots. He has but at intervals a patch of stunted aspens, one hand-thereby will you know and now and then a hut, whence prohim. Show him this pistol, and he ceeded the hoarse bark of dogs, or a will conduct you to me. Seek not to sheep-pen vacant until nightfall. compel from him the secret of my There were fens overgrown with reeds hiding-place, for no tortures could and rashes, and swarming with white wring it from his lips. Be not angry. herons; and vast tracts of moor, I must be cautious. For sixteen grazed and trampled by every sort of years have I been hunted like a beast cattle. Now and then, on the far of prey. And now away, and keep to horizon, the travellers caught sight of your right to find the path. An a steeple; or of a dark mass of wood, opposite road is mine."

coaxed by toil and care from the unHe set spurs to his horse, and gal- grateful sandy soil. loped off through the forest.

At last night fell. All around grew

grey, and then black; but still the The fortnight had not expired old horse-herd kept steadily on his when George entered the tavern at way. In the remote distance a red Félegyház.

glimmer was seen: right and left In a dark corner, over a measure of famed the fires of the shepherds. wine, sat the grey-haired, one-handed “ Yonder is Rosa Sandor," said the beggar.

Betyár, pointing to the distant light: George showed the pistol. The " there we shall find him." beggar rose from his seat, drank off his Another hour brought them to the wine, paid the tavern-keeper, and left place. As they drew near, the horses the house. Not a syllable escaped that stood round the fire neighed him.

aloud, and the figures of three men The two men stopped before a were visible. Their attitude was one wretched hut, at the extremity of the of watchfulness and determination. village. The beggar went in, and A peculiar whistle from the lips of brought out two powerful black sad the old Betyár warned them of the dle-horses. He signed to George to approach of friends. mount one, whilst he himself sprang One of the three men at the firoupon the other, as actively as though was the robber chief, Rosa Sandor. he were a young man and had both “What bring you?" asked Rosa. hands.

“ Your pardon!" cried George; and, Once fairly off, the old beggar be- springing from his steaming horse, he came talkative. These horses, he said, handed a sealed packet to his interrowere hacks of Rosa Sandor's, good gator. “Read and rejoice!"* beasts enough ; but the Captain's The robber turned to the firelight, and favourite steed was far finer and bet- unfolded the document, which quivered ter, and wonld let none but its master in his hand as he read it. One tear mount it, and wonld gallop for whole and then another fell upon the paper ; days together without rest, or food, or slowly he bent his knees, and turned drink. It swam the Theiss thrice his glistening eyes to heaven. “My running, and watched its master's Lord and my God!” he exclaimed, sleep like the most faithful dog, his utterance choked by sobs, for neighing when danger approached. sixteen years I have been hunted like

* Rosa Sandor was less a highwayman thau a cattle-lifter, and pursued his vocation in the neighbourhood of Szegedin. “ He was never in prison," says , Schlesinger, “but repented his misdemeanours of his own free will, and wrote to the magistrates stating that he would leave their cattle alone, if they would pardon him for the past and allow him to pursue the Austrians.” The Hungarian Government granted his request, and he did good service, especially against Jellachich and the Serbs ; and also repeatedly entered Pesth and Komorn with despatches, when those places were closely invested by the Austrians.-See Schlesinger, i. 226-8, for other particulars of this Hungarian Robin Hood, who was at the head of a band of three. hundred men, and was further remarkable by his abstinence from bloodshed.

a wild beast, but Thou vouchsafest to Many died, and no one could say me to be once more a man!”

what had killed them. The rough He turned to his companions. “To uneducated soldiers were pining away horse!” he cried ; "let the troop in home-sickness, like flowers transassemble.”

planted to a foreign and ungenial soil. They sprang to their horses, and An experiment was tried. Some soon upon all sides the signal-whistle of the sick men received leave to go was heard. In ten minutes, a hun- home. The next day--they were dred and eighty men, well mounted and well and hearty. armed, mustered round the fire.

It became known that some one “ Friends and comrades," cried was at work secretly innoculating the Sandor, " that which we have so long soldiers with this strange malady; desired has come to pass. We are no but it was impossible to detect the longer robbers-our country pardons person. us. It is granted us to atone our The soldiers !-oh, not one of them crimes by an honourable death. Is would betray him ; and all snares there one amongst you who does not were laid in vain. With the officers repent his past life, and rejoice to be he never meddled. The private solallowed to end it in honour ?"

diers were his men. With them he "Not one!” was the unanimous felt himself secure from treachery. shout.

And the seed he scattered abroad “Will you follow me to the battle ?” produced an abundant harvest. “Everywhere! To death!”

The dejection of the troops became "Swear it.”

daily more striking. The soldiers The vow was brief. “We joyfully grew wild and intractable. No lonswear to shed our blood for our father- ger, when riding their horses to water, land !"

did they sing, as had been their wont, “Add,” said George to Rosa, “and joyous ditties in praise of wine and to give no quarter !

women. Their songs were now sad

and strange-sounding; mournfulwords NOSTALGIA.

to yet more dismal tunes. They sang The soldier is dying of home-sick- of their country, of their dear native

land, and of strife and bloodshed, in On a sudden an epidemic broke out dirge-like strains; and the burden of amongst the Hungarian troops sta- every couplet was “ Eljen Magyar!tioned in foreign lands.

Like the last accents of a dying man A mysterious man wandered from were the tones they uttered, sinking place to place, visiting the wine-houses deeper and deeper, and ending in frequented by the hussars, and joining piteous long-protracted cadences. in their conversation. The words he Still are such songs to be heard in spoke, repeated from mouth to mouth, Hungary's forests, and around her vilspread far and wide amongst the lages, in the silent night-time. Now, light-hearted soldiers, whose light- more than ever, do they sound like heartedness then suddenly left them. funeral dirges, and their long sad The stranger told them of things notes like wailings from the grave. which had happened in their native land; and, when he departed, he left In a small Gallician town was behind him printed verses and pro- quartered a division of hussars--splenclamations. These the privates took did fellows, for whom the heart of to their serjeants to have read to many a Polish maiden beat quicker them. When they heard them read than its wont. The most beautiful they wept and cursed, and learned by woman in all the neighbourhood loved heart both verse and prose, from the the best blade amongst the hussarsfirst word to the last, and repeated the Captain. them from morning till night.

Countess Anna K-nsky, the lovely Then many took to their beds, and Polish widow, had been for six months neither ate nor drank; and when the betrothed to the bold hussar officer, doctors asked what ailed them, they and the wedding-day was near at pointed to their hearts, and said, hand. A single night intervened. On Tv Home! home!-let us go home!” the eve of the happy day, the bride

ness.

groom went to visit his bride. He bridegroom's side, seated herself at was a tall slender man, with the the piano, and played with feverish bloom of youth still upon his face; but energy the well-known song, his high forehead was already bald ;

“ Noch ist Polen nicht verloren!” "Sun and moon together,” as the Hungarian proverb says.

her eyes flashing through tears. Her The bride was a fair and delicate lover approached her, removed her lady, with abundant black locks, a hand, which trembled with emotion, pale nervous countenance, and blue from the keys of the instrument, and eyes of that unusual lustre which one kissed it. finds only in Polish blue eyes. At “ Poor Poland ! Well may thy sight of her lover, her alabaster cheek daughters weep over thy fate; but was overspread with the roses of alas! in vain. "I was lately in Pesth. love's spring-time, and her eyes beam- Passing along a street where a large ed like the rising sun.

house was building, I noticed amongst The bridegroom would fain have the labourers a woman, carrying appeared cheerful ; but it is hard to stones to and fro upon her head, for deceive the gaze of love, which reads the use of the masons. Twice the beloved one's trouble in each fold thrice-I passed before her. The of the brow, in each absent glance of sweat streamed from her face; her the eye. Tenderly she approached limbs could scarcely support her. She him, smoothed his forehead's wrinkles

was no longer young, and the toil with her band, and imprinted a kiss was severe. This woman once posin their place. But again they re- sessed a palace in Warsaw-far, far turned.

more magnificent than the house she ** What ails thee, dearest? How was then helping to build. Its poris this? Sad on the eve of our wed- tals were surmounted by a prince's ding-day?"

coronet; and many are the joyous "1? Nothing ails me. But I am hours I have spent beneath its hospiannoyed at an incident-a casualty- table roof.

When, at the which I cannot postpone. The court- sound of the noonday bell, she seated martial has condemned a man to herself at her wretched meal, I acdeath. I have just now signed the costed her. For a long time she sentence. The man is to be shot to- would not recognise me; then she morrow : just on our bridal-day! I turned away her

head and wept. The would it were otherwise !"

other women only laughed at her. I “ The man is doubtless a criminal?” offered her money; she thanked me,

“ According to military law. He and took very little. She, once the has been debauching soldiers from mistress of millions, besought me to their duty-exciting them to desert send the remainder to her little and return home to fight the Serbs. daughter, whom she had left a depenDeath is the penalty of his crime." dant on a rich family in a distant

* And you have signed the sen- town. I promised to seek out her tence? Are you not a Magyar ? daughter. "When I had last seen her Love you not your native land ? she was a lovely child, six years of

"I am a soldier before everything. age. Eight years had elapsed, bring. I respect the laws."

ing her to the verge of womanhood. * Impossible! You, who love so I reached the house. In answer to well, cannot be devoid of that most my inquiries, a girl appeared-not ennobling kind of love-patriotism." that fair and delicate being whose

** I can love, but I cannot dream. sweet countenance still dwelt in my Of the maxims and principles of re- memory, but a rude creature, with volationists, I understand not a word; hard coarse features and wild eyes. but thus much I know, revolutions She did not recognise me, often Dever end well. Much blood, little though she had seen me. I spoke to honour, eternal remorse.”

her in Polish ; she understood not a * Say not eternal remorse, but word. I asked after her mother; she eternal hope. Hope that a time must stared vacantly in my face

.. come, which will compensate all suf- Truly, the fate of Poland is a terrible ferings and sacrifices.

example of what a nation may expect The fair enthusiast quitted her from its neighbours when it engages

women.

a wild beast, but Thou vouchsafest to Many died, and no one could say me to be once more a man!”

what had killed them.

The rough He turned to his companions. “To uneducated soldiers were pining away horse ! ” he cried ; " let the troop in home-sickness, like flowers transassemble."

planted to a foreign and ungenial soil. They sprang to their horses, and An experiment was tried. Some soon upon all sides the signal-whistle of the sick men received leave to go was heard.

In ten minutes, a hun- home. The next day-they were dred and eighty men, well mounted and well and hearty. armed, mustered round the fire.

It became known that some one “ Friends and comrades," cried was at work secretly innoculating the Sandor, " that which we have so long soldiers with this strange malady; desired has come to pass. We are no but it was impossible to detect the longer robbers-our country pardons person. us. It is granted us to atone our The soldiers !-oh, not one of them crimes by an honourable death. Is would betray him; and all snares there one amongst you who does not were laid in vain. With the officers repent his past life, and rejoice to be he never meddled. The private solallowed to end it in honour ? "

diers were his men. With them he “Not one!" was the unanimous felt himself secure from treachery. shout.

And the seed he scattered abroad “Will you follow me to the battle ?" produced an abundant harvest. “Everywhere! To death!”

The dejection of the troops became “ Swear it."

daily more striking. The soldiers The vow was brief. “We joyfully grew wild and intractable. No lonswear to shed our blood for our father- ger, when riding their horses to water, land!"

did they sing, as had been their wont, “Add," said George to Rosa, “and joyous ditties in praise of wine and to give no quarter ! "

Their songs were now sad and strange-sounding; mournfulwords

to yet more dismal tunes. They sang The soldier is dying of home-sick- of their country, of their dear native

land, and of strife and bloodshed, in On a sudden an epidemic broke out dirge-like strains; and the burden of amongst the Hungarian troops sta- every couplet was Eljen Magyar!tioned in foreign lands.

Like the last accents of a dying man A mysterious man wandered from were the tones they uttered, sinking place to place, visiting the wine-houses deeper and deeper, and ending in frequented by the hussars, and joining piteous long-protracted cadences. in their conversation. The words he Still are such songs to be heard in spoke, repeated from mouth to mouth, Hungary's forests, and around her vilspread far and wide amongst the lages, in the silent night-time. Now, light-hearted soldiers, whose light- more than ever, do they sound like heartedness then suddenly left them. funeral dirges, and their long sad The stranger told them of things notes like wailings from the grave. which had happened in their native land; and, when he departed, he left

In a small Gallician town was behind him printed verses and pro- quartered a division of hussars--splenclamations. These the privates took did fellows, for whom the heart of to their serjeants to have read to many a Polish maiden beat quicker them.

When they heard them read than its wont. The most beautiful they wept and cursed, and learned by woman in all the neighbourhood loved heart both verse and prose, from the the best blade amongst the hussarsfirst word to the last, and repeated the Captain. them from morning till night.

Countess Anna K-nsky, the lovely Then many took to their beds, and Polish widow, had been for six months neither ate nor drank; and when the betrothed to the bold hussar officer, doctors asked what ailed them, they and the wedding-day was near at pointed to their hearts, and said, hand. A single night intervened. On 1. Home! home !-let us go home!” the eve of the happy day, the bride

NOSTALGIA.

ness.

was

was severe.

Its por

groom went to visit his bride. He bridegroom's side, seated herself at

a tall slender man, with the the piano, and played with feverish bloom of youth still upon his face; but energy the well-known song, his high forehead was already bald ;

“Noch ist Polen nicht verloren ! ” “ Sun and moon together," as the Hungarian proverb says.

her eyes flashing through tears. Her The bride was a fair and delicate lover approached her, removed her lady, with abundant black locks, a hand, which trembled with emotion, pale nervous countenance, and blue from the keys of the instrument, and eyes of that unusual lustre which one kissed it. finds only in Polish blue eyes. At "Poor Poland! Well may thy sight of her lover, her alabaster cheek daughters weep over thy fate; but was overspread with the roses of alas ! in vain. I was lately in Pesth. love's spring-time, and her eyes beam- Passing along a street where a large ed like the rising sun.

house was building, I noticed amongst The bridegroom would fain have the labourers a woman, carrying appeared cheerful ; but it is hard to stones to and fro upon her head, for deceive the gaze of love, which reads the use of the masons. Twicethe beloved one's trouble in each fold thrice-I passed before her. The of the brow, in each absent glance of sweat streamed from her face; her the eye. Tenderly she approached limbs could scarcely support her. She him, smoothed his forehead's wrinkles was no longer young, and the toil with her hand, and imprinted a kiss

This woman once posin their place. But again they re- sessed a palace in Warsaw-far, far turned.

more magnificent than the house she " What ails thee, dearest? How was then helping to build. is this? Sad on the eve of our wed- tals were surmounted by a prince's ding-day?"

coronet; and many are the joyous "I? Nothing ails me.

But I am hours I have spent beneath its hospiannoyed at an incident—a casualty- table roof.

When, at the which I cannot postpone. The court- sound of the noonday bell, she seated martial has condemned a man to herself at her wretched meal, I acdeath. I have just now signed the costed her. For a long time she sentence. The man is to be shot to- would not recognise me; then she morrow: just on our bridal-day! I turned away her head and wept. The would it were otherwise !"

other women only laughed at her. I “ The man is doubtless a criminal?” offered her money; she thanked me,

“ According to military law. He and took very little. She, once the has been debauching soldiers from mistress of millions, besought me to their duty—exciting them to desert send the remainder to her little and return home to fight the Serbs. daughter, whom she had left a depenDeath is the penalty of his crime." dant on a rich family in a distant

" And you have signed the sen- town. I promised to seek out her tence? Are you not a Magyar? daughter. When I had last seen her Love you not your native land ?" she was a lovely child, six years of

" I am a soldier before everything. age. Eight years had elapsed, bring, I respect the laws."

ing her to the verge of womanhood. “ Impossible! You, who love so I reached the house. In answer to well, cannot be devoid of that most my inquiries, a girl appeared-not ennobling kind of love-patriotism." that fair and delicate being whose

“I can love, but I cannot dream. sweet countenance still dwelt in my Of the maxims and principles of re- memory, but a rude creature, with volationists, I understand not a word; hard coarse features and wild eyes. but thus much I know, revolutions She did not recognise me, often never end well. Much blood, little though she had seen me. I spoke to honour, eternal remorse.

her in Polish ; she understood not a “Say not eternal remorse, but word. I asked after her mother; she eternal hope. Hope that a time must stared vacantly in my face. come, which will compensate all suf- Truly, the fate of Poland is a terrible ferings and sacrifices."

example of what a nation may expect The fair enthusiast quitted her from its neighbours when it engages

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