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therefore, that he was in favour of a that it was now time and necessary to moderate rate of duty: first, as a slight deal promptly and generously with that protection on the one hand; and next, as interest. The noble lord further exa slight relief from the burden of taxa- pressed his opinion that the principle of tion on the other. One expression of protection by moderate import duties, his, the noble lord subsequently remarked, against competition upon unequal terms which had been very much commented with the foreigner, was equally applicable on, was, that he had stated that he was to our colonial interests." not prepared to reverse the policy of Sir The days of the present Ministry R. Peel. He well knew that great and are evidently numbered. During sudden changes were the most fraught their tenure of office they have failed with danger, and that nothing could be to earn the love or approbation of the done effectually or safely in a country like England which was not calmly and people; and few will lament their deliberately done, upon full considera. fall. Let us hope that with them tion, and even after experience. Two

may close a period of unnational and most formidable measures had of late unnatural policy, which assuredly years been enacted. One had already hereafter will reflect no honour on the effected great eril ; but, he feared, not names of those who were its principal to the full extent that would yet be de- instruments and advocates; and that veloped. The other was the repeal of no future statesman, of any rank or the navigation laws, which was, perhaps, eminence, will so far mistake his duty even more important, for obvious reasons. to his sovereign and to his country as What he had stated was, that he did not

to entertain the idea that party ascenpropose a reversal of Sir R. Peel's policy, dency is for one moment to be weighed but a modification of that policy in those cases in which it should have been found

in the scale against the real interests to work injuriously. The evil effects of of the nation, which can alone be that policy, he then went on to observe, secured by protecting the labour of had been proved with regard to the in the people, and by guarding from terest which was mainly suffering—the foreign encroachment the rights of agricultural interest ; and he thought NATIVE INDUSTRY.

Printed by William Blackwood and Sons, Edinburgk.

EDINBURGH MAGAZINE.

No. CCCCXXVII.

MAY, 1851.

VOL. LXIX.

CONTENTS.

513

531

545

564

SOME AMERICAN POETS,
My NOVEL; OR, VARIETIES IN ENGLISH LIFE. Part IX.,
TRANSATLANTIC TOURISTS,
ONWARD TENDENCIES,
THE PAPAL AGGRESSION BILL,
THE BOOK OF THE FARM,
An EVENING WALK. BY THOMAS AIRD,
MODERN STATE TRIALS. PART V.,
THE DINNER TO LORD STANLEY,

573

588

603

605

635

EDINBURGH:

WILLIAM BLACKWOOD & SONS, 45 GEORGE STREET ;

AND 37 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON.
To whom all communications (post paid) must be addressed.

SOLD BY ALL THE BOOKSELLERS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM.

PRINTED BY WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS, EDINBURGH.

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It is probable that there has been better a vehicle of thought than verse written much excellent poetry on the has proved to him, and that even other side of the Atlantic with which when the thought is of a poetic cast,) we are unacquainted, which perhaps that to summon him to receive judghas never crossed the water at all. ment here amongst the poets, would We should therefore be very unwise be only to detract from the commendif we professed to give here, even if ation we have bestowed upon him. such a plan could be executed within We say it is not improbable that the compass of a few pages, a general there is much poetry published in review of American poetry. All America which does not reach us, that we propose is, to make some because there is much, and of a very critical observations on the writers meritorious character, published here before us, accompanied by such ex- at home in England, which fails of tracts as shall not unworthily occupy obtaining any notoriety. Its circulathe attention of our readers. Even tion is more of a private than a public the list of names which we have set nature, depending perhaps upon the down at the head of this paper is the social position of the author, or folresult more of accident than design : lowing, for a short distance, in the the works of these authors lay upon wake of a literary reputation obtained our table. The two first names will by a different species of writing. Not be recognised directly as the fittest that our critics are reluctant to praise. representatives of American poetry; On the contrary, they might be they rise immediately to the lips of accused of rendering their praise of every one who speaks upon the sub- no avail by an indiscriminate liberject. The two last will probably be ality, if it were not the true history of new to our readers, and if so, it will the matter that a growing indifference be our pleasant task to introduce of the public to this species of literathem. One name only, familiar to ture led the way to this very diffuse all cars, has been purposely omitted. and indiscriminate commendation. If We have elsewhere spoken, and with no one reads the book to test his no stinted measure of praise, of the criticism, the critic himself loses writings of Mr Emerson. That his motive for watchfulness and writer has found in prose so much accuracy: he passes judgment with

LONGFELLOW's Poetical Works.
BRYANT's Poetical Works.

WHITTIER's Poetical Works.
VOL, LXIX.-NO. CCCCXXVII.

Poems. By JAMES Russell LOWELL.
Poems. By O. W. HOLMES.

2 L

supreme indifference on a matter the upon its hundred iron wheels, shoots world is careless about; and saves through the little bridge, and rolls himself any further trouble by be- like thunder along these level grooves. stowing on all alike that safe, moder- It is soon out of sight, and the counate, diluted eulogy, which always has try is not only again calm and soli. the appearance of being fair and tary, but appears for the moment to equitable. Much meritorious poetry be utterly abandoned and deserted. may therefore, for aught we know, It has its old life, however, in it still. both in England and America, Well, as we were standing thus exist and give pleasure amongst an upon the little bridge, in the open almost. private circle of admirers. country, and looking down into this And why not sing for a small audience deep ravine of the engineer's making, as well as for a great ? It is not we noticed, fluttering beneath us, a every Colin that can pipe, that can yellow butterfly, sometimes beating now expect to draw the whole country- its wings against the barren sides, and side to listen to him. What if he sometimes perching on the glistering can please only a quite domestic rails themselves. Clearly, most gathering, his neighbours or his clan? preposterously out of place was this We are not of those who would tell same beautiful insect. What had it Colin to lay down his pipe : we to do there? What food, what framight whisper in his ear to mind his grance, what shelter could it find ? sheep as well, and not to break his Or who was to see and to admire? heart, or to disturb his peace, because There was not a shrub, nor an herb, some sixty persons, and not six thou- nor a flower, nor a playmate of any sand, are grateful for his minstrelsy. description. It is manifest, most

One fine summer's day we stood beautiful butterfly, that you cannot upon a little bridge thrown over the live here. From these new highways deep cutting of a newly constructed of ours, from these iron thoroughfares, railway. It was an open country you must certainly depart. But it around us, a common English land- follows not that you must depart the scape-fields with their hedgerows, world altogether. In yonder hollow and their thin elm-trees stripped of at a distance there is a cottage, surtheir branches, with here and there a rounded by its trees and its flowers, slight undulation of the soil, giving and there are little children whom relief to, or partially concealing, the you may sport with, and tease, and red and white cottage or the red- delight, taking care they do not catch tiled barn. We were looking, how- you napping. There is still gardenever, into the deep cutting beneath ground in the world for you, and such Here the iron rails glistened in

as you. the sun, and still, as the eye pursued Sometimes, when we have seen their track, four threads of glittering pretty little gilded volumes of song steel ran their parallel course, but and poetry lying about in the great apparently approximating in the far highways of our industrial world, we perspective, till they were lost by have recalled this scene to mind. mere failure of the power of vision to There is garden-ground left for them follow them: the road itself was also, and many a private haunt, solistraight as an arrow. On the steep tary or domestic, where they will be banks, fresh from the spade and pick- welcome. axe, not a shrub was seen, not a blade We have heard it objected against

On the road itself there American poets, but chiefly by their was nothing but clods of earth, or own countrymen, that they are not loose gravel, which lay in heaps by sufficiently national. This surely is a the side of the rails, or in hollows most unreasonable complaint. The between them : it was enough that Americans inhabit what was once, the iron bars lay there clear of all and is still sometimes called, the New obstruction. No human foot, no foot World, but they are children of the of man or of beast, was ever intended Old. Their religion grew, like ours, to tread that road. It was for the in Asia ; they receive it, as we do, engine only. From time to time the through the nations of the west of shrill whistle is heard the train, Europe; they are, like us, descend

us.

of grass.

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