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MESSRS. BINGHAM, HEMENWAY, MOODY, DOCKERY,

AND LIVINGSTON,

IN CHARGE OF

LEGISLATIVE, EXECUTIVE, AND JUDICIAL APPROPRIATION BILL FOR 1899.

WASHINGTON:
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.

1897.

JHA

Fifty-fifth Congress, second session.

CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES,
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

December 13, 1897 Resolved, that there be printed for the use of the House 2,000 copies of so much of the hearings before the Committee on Appropriations as relates to the Civil Service Commission, being pages 158–311 of the hearings on the legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation bill for 1899, as printed for said committee, together with the brief of the principal civil-service examinations arranged alphabetically, which exhibit the subject, scope, and relative weights of such examinations furnished to said Committee on Appropriations. Attest:

A. McDOWELL, Clerk.

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7.5. Eft. 21/87

THURSDAY, December 9, 1897. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.

STATEMENTS OF MESSRS. JOHN R. PROCTER (PRESIDENT), WIL

LIAM G. RICE, AND JOHN B. HARLOW. Mr. PROCTER. First, Mr. Chairman, I will tell you that the work for which we ask this appropriation is saving not less than $3,000,000 annually

to the

Government by reason of the smaller number of employees necessary to perform the work and the increased efficiency of these employees.

The CHAIRMAN. Have you got your report out? Mr. PROCTER. No. I would state that in response to your request for the orders of the President from the beginning of the passage of the law

The CHAIRMAN. I wrote you on November 27, asking for "copies of all orders of the President since the enactment of the civil-service act of 1883, extending its operations or provisions to the civil service, or modifying or suspending any such orders." Mr. PROCTER. These are they (exhibiting paper). Now, we will have also — The CHAIRMAN. The next inquiry I made

was, "The whole number of persons now included in the classified service ?" That doubtless your report gives. I asked you that question because I thought possibly it would take a little time, and I presume it is a part of your annual report. And then I asked also, ""The namber of persons now embraced within the classified service who entered the classified service other than by competitive or other examinations under the ciril-service act of 18839".

Mr. PROCTER. We have telephoned for the letter giving that information, which will be here in five minutes.

The CHAIRMAN. That you answer?
Mr. PROCTER. Yes, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. I want to see the relation of the men in the classified service under your roles and exaininations and the men who were included or became part of the classified service by reason of the extension of its operations. I also asked for “the total appropriations to date, and by years, of the Civil Service Commission since its organization, including for rents, and also the approximate total and annual expenditures for contingent expenses and for printing for the same period.” In othor words, I want the full expenses of your Commission since its organization.

Mr. PROCTER. We have that.

The CHAIRMAN. Which would, of course, include the compensation of your force detailed from other Departments ?

Mr. PROCTER. Yes, sir; we will file all that.

The CHAIRMAN. The matter of the orders is a matter of record, and we will have it printed so it can be looked over. Now, we will take up the first paragraph in the bill, which is on page 39. Do you ask an increase?

Mr. PROCTER. We ask some increases in compensation.
Mr. LIVINGSTON. You ask $500 increase for the secretary?
Mr. PROCTER. We ask that the number of $1,800 clerks be reduced by two.

The CHAIRMAN. First we will take you up in line-this is only a short examination. You ask that your secretary, now receiving $2,000, may receive $500 additional!

Mr. PROCTER. Yes, sir.
The CHAIRMAN. Please give me your reasons for that.

Mr. PROCTER. Well, the work of the Commission has increased to such an enormous extent; and the secretary also acts as disbursing officer, which requires a great deal of extra time to conduct the business of the Commission, and the responsibility of the duties intrusted to the secretary are such that he is believed to be entitled to that compensation. The secretary of a commission which does as much business as we do should receive the amount asked for. I think it is less pay than is received elsewhere in the Government service for the same character of duties. The CHAIRMAN. That is your reason!

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