Sugar: A New and Profitable Industry in the United States for Capital, Agriculture and Labor to Supply the Home Market Yearly with $100,000,000 of Its Product ...

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Orange Judd Company, 1897 - 160 pages
 

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Page 102 - ... and should include leaves and a small portion of the crown. Dr. Wiley says the object of removing this portion of the beet is to prevent the mineral salts, which have accumulated in large quantities therein, from entering the factory. These mineral salts exercise a very deleterious influence on the crystalization of the sugar, and should therefore be removed.
Page 74 - The differences in varieties have arisen by reason of special selection and culture, producing a pure strain of some valuable peculiarity in the beet. These accidental valuable qualities, by careful selection, have become fixed, and are associated with certain external properties which have thus come to be regarded as distinguishing characteristics. The shape and size of the beet, its color, the character of the foliage, whether erect or spreading, etc., are the most frequent marks of distinction.
Page 157 - It is ordered, adjudged, and decreed, that the said plaintiff recover of the said defendant the sum of thirtynine thousand three hundred and nineteen dollars and 49 cents, with interest at the rate of 8 per cent, per annum on...
Page 40 - The real purity of the beet is also to be distinguished from the apparent purity of the juice. The real purity of the beets is obtained by dividing the percentage of sugar in the beet by the total solid matter...
Page 40 - ... juice. This juice not only contains sugar but various other substances,, largely mineral matter, which are a great hindrance, causing serious losses of sugar during the manufacture. A hundred pounds of average beet juice will carry about fifteen pounds of solid matter, of which twelve pounds may be sugar, and three pounds matter not sugar. If we divide the number of pounds of sugar (12), by the total pounds of solid matter, (15), we get .80, which sum is called the coefficient of purity; that...
Page 40 - ... A hundred pounds of average beet juice will carry about fifteen pounds of solid matter, of which twelve pounds may be sugar, and three pounds matter not sugar. If we divide the number of pounds of sugar (12), by the total pounds of solid matter, (15), we get .80, which sum is called the coefficient of purity; that is, beet juice with 15 parts solids, 12 of which are sugar, is said to have coefficient of purity of 80. If the sample of juice, contains 16 parts solid matter and 12 parts sugar, as...
Page 87 - As soon as the frost is out of the ground and the soil in workable condition in the spring, a heavy application of superphosphate of lime should be made and raked in.
Page 82 - I will say further that greater additions of potash and phosphoric acid have no disadvantageous effects upon the crop. * * * Direct investigations in regard to the relation between the sugar and potash in consecutive crops for many years have failed to give the least ground for a contrary conclusion. But it must not be expected on the other hand that increasing fertilizations, especially potash fertilization, will produce proportionately increasing crops, as has been asserted by some.
Page 133 - ... factory, and for twenty or thirty thousand dollars it can be all fitted up. Any attempt of this kind is simply throwing money away, and it would be a great misfortune to the beet sugar business to have it gone into without sufficient capital to erect a factory of proper size, as well as of the most modern construction.
Page 40 - This true, we see at once that the manufacturer desires beet roots not only carrying much sugar but also with a high coefficient of purity. Immature beets those grown on soils rich in vegetable matter or fertilized with fresh barnyard manure, those grown on land recently cleared from the forest, or on drained swamp lands, are all liable to carry a great deal of solid matter not sugar in the juice, and consequently are quite unsatisfactory to the sugar manu facturer.

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