A Manual of Medical Jurisprudence and State Medicine

Front Cover
Sherwood, 1836 - 554 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 515 - Your worm is your only emperor for diet: we fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves for maggots: your fat king and your lean beggar is but variable service; two dishes, but to one table: that's the end.
Page 93 - A physician ought not to abandon a patient because the case is deemed incurable; for his attendance may continue to be highly useful to the patient, and comforting to the relatives around him, even in the last period of a fatal malady, by alleviating pain and other symptoms, and by soothing mental anguish. To decline attendance, under such circumstances, would be sacrificing to fanciful delicacy, and mistaken liberality, that moral duty, which is independent of, and far superior to, all pecuniary...
Page 88 - Secrecy and delicacy, when required by peculiar circumstances, should be strictly observed ; and the familiar and confidential intercourse to which physicians are admitted in their professional visits, should be used with discretion, and with the most scrupulous regard to fidelity and honor.
Page 515 - Not where he eats, but where he is eaten : a certain convocation of politic worms are e'en at him. Your worm is your only emperor for diet : we fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves for maggots...
Page 94 - ... tend to obscure his judgment, and produce timidity and irresolution in his practice. Under such circumstances, medical men are peculiarly dependent upon each other, and kind offices and professional aid should always be cheerfully and gratuitously afforded. Visits ought not, however, to be...
Page 111 - To be competently skilled in ancient learning, is by no means a work of such insuperable pains. The very progress itself is attended with delight, and resembles a journey through some pleasant country, where every mile we advance new charms arise. It is certainly as easy to be a scholar, as a gamester, or many other characters equally illiberal and low. The same application, the same quantity of habit, will fit us for one, as completely as for the other.
Page 21 - Whether what Temple says be true, that physicians have had more learning than the other faculties, I will not stay to inquire ; but, I believe, every man has found in physicians great liberality and dignity of sentiment, very prompt effusion of beneficence and willingness to exert a lucrative art where there is no hope of lucre.
Page 375 - Society is not at hand) into one nostril, carefully closing the other and the mouth ; at the same time drawing downwards, and pushing gently backwards the upper part of the windpipe, to allow a more free admission of air : blow the bellows gently, in order to inflate the lungs, till the breast be...
Page xxi - ... whereupon the brow of the dead, which before was of a livid and carrion colour, began to have a dew, or gentle sweat, arise on it, which increased by degrees, till the sweat ran down in drops on the face ; the brow turned to a lively and fresh colour ; and the deceased opened one of her eyes, and shut it again, three several times ; she likewise thrust out the ring or marriage finger three times, and pulled it in again, and the finger dropped blood upon the grass.
Page 98 - The opportunity which a physician not unfrequently enjoys of promoting and strengthening the good resolutions of his patients, suffering under the consequences of vicious conduct, ought never to be neglected.

Bibliographic information