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it, but unless we are prepared to return to the Zenana poor Sir George took his leave was an outburst of stage of civilisation, the consequences which Marcella so involuntary homage to the divine splendour of her ideal bitterly deplored will always result. Given the two of married life. factors as Mrs. Ward paints them-Marcella and Sir Now, if we are to go in sackcloth and ashes all our George Tressady-Sir George could no more help falling days, and to be saddled to the end of life with responin love with Marcella than steel can resist the attraction sibility for the moral and spiritual education and salvaof the magnet. And, indeed, it would be a great mis tion of the husband or wife of any person who falls in fortune the Sir George Tressadys in the world if they love with us in this fashion, there is a bad lookout for could. This, indeed, Sir George himself recognises in most of us. Better by far the Zenana, than to expose his meditations which I have just quoted. Marcella our Marcellas to such pains and penalties when was to him the enchantress who roused his better their conduct has been so irreproachably correct. If nature, and who enabled hiin to see the world from a truer Marcella had flirted with Sir George, if she had allowed and nobler standpoint. She broke through the super him to make love to her, if she had made love to ticial cynicism in which he had masked himself against him; if she had in any single word or act done anythe divine prompting; which come to all men, and thing to which the most devoted husband could take she had done all this without doing, so far as Mrs. Ward exception, it would be different. As it is, it is to be has shown, anything excepting that which it was her feared that an unregenerate world will shrug its plain and simple duty to do, both to herself, her husband, shoulders and envy Mrs. Ward the privilege of living her cause, and Sir George Tressady himself. With the in a realm where men and women act habitually with exception of ten minutes on the eve of a great political such scrupulous regard to the austerest standard of crisis, the issue of which depended on Sir George's exclusive devotion. Of course the question as to how action, she never was guilty of showing him sufficient far a man or woman is right in using their personal sympathy for even her own conscience to feel uneasy. charm or influence to secure a political end is one that During these ten minutes in which, if at all, the trans can be debated endlessly, not to much profit. Mes gression of Marcella lay, she acted in a manner to which Butler, I know, rather inclines to Marcella's view of the it would be difficult for the most fastidious moralist to case, saying she hates influence; what she loves is object. They talked about politics. They were in a friendship and comradeship. garden together, other people were near them, and she That is all very well. It really amounts to little more did not say one solitary word which she would not have than saying that you prefer to gain your end by said if her husband had been standing by her side. exercising your influence unconsciously raiher than conIndeed, it was all for her husband, and her husband's ciously. It may be well to shut our eyes to it, and career, and her husband's bill, that she went as far as for Marcella and Mrs. Butler to imagine that they win she did. To use her own phrase when she told her adherents by the cogency of their logic, or the fervour of husband about it immerliately afterwards

their eloquence. As a matter of fact, neither they nor any “He wanted sympathy desperately. I gave it him. one else mould the lives of men or women solely by logie Then I urged him to throw himself into his public or eloquence. Religions are founded, revolutions accomwork, I believe I threw myself upon his feelings. I plished, by the magic of personal influence. felt that he was very sympathetic, that I had a power You cannot eat your cake and have it, and we cannot over him. It was a kind of bribery. It was quite dif send our charming Marcellas out into the midst of a world ferent from any other time. I did try to influence him crowded with Tressadys without having to take the just through being a woman. There! It is quite true.” consequences, and one of those consequences is that the

As if the poor dear creature had ever been doing any Tressadys will fall in love with the Marcellas, and they thing else all her life than trying to influence men, and will do it as Sir George did, all the more certainly if using the great gift of her womanly fascination as her Marcella never feels for them a single scintilla of any chief weapon in all her campaigus. During the conver emotion warmer than friendly comradeship. sation they talked about nothing but politics, and the There remains the question of Tressady's wife. And nearest approach to the verge of anything in the shape here Mrs. Ward's solution is more attractive because less of affectionate emotion was in the following sentence : impossible, although it is to be feared that very few

“I suppose one is tired and foolish after all these women indeed, who had given so little cause for weeks,' she said, with a breaking voice; I apologise. jealousy, would have laboured so sedulously to relieve You see that when one comes to see everything through the pain which they had unwittingly occasioned. Letty another's eyes, to live in another's life.' Tressady felt a was a foolish, mean little thing, utterly unfit for the sudden stab, then a leap of joy, hungry, desolate joy position to which she had been raised by her marthat she could thus admit him to the sanctuary of her riage with Sir George. She gave her husband heart, let him touch the pulse of her machine, at the neither love, sympathy, nor help. Her flirtations same time that it revealed the eternal gulf between with odious admirers were infinitely worse than the them, It gave him a passionate sense of intimacy of utmost that had taken place between her husband privilege. You have a marvellous idea of marriage,' and Marcella. Yet because she got mad with jealousyhe said under his breath."

a jealousy which for the first time made her And therewith that interview of transgression ended. realise that she needed her husband's love-Marcella, the Now what in all the world could possibly be more inno great, glorious, resplendent leader of society, and social, cent than that? At the very supreme moment, when, if political queen alike of Mile End Road and of Londoa ever, the transgression occurred, what Marcella does is to society, must spend hours every day petting her, soothing convince the man who was full of wild, hopeless, pas her, flattering her, and coddling her up, to be rewarde) sionate love for her, that the very pulse of the machine by having her thrown upon her hands to be cared for to in the very sanctuary of her heart was the absolute the end of her life! Oneness which existed between herself and her husband. The cloven foot of this theory of life comes out clearly She saw everything through her husband's eyes, lived in the last interview between Marcella and Sir George. in her husband's life, and the last words with which Marcella, we are told, felt that if Letty cared for her

husband, she had the right to hate Marcella, not because there had been anything wrong in their relations, but because he had learnt ideal truths from her.

A sudden perception leaped on Marcella, revealing strange worlds. How could she have hated, with what fierceness, what flame the woman who taught ideal truths to Maxwell!”

“Strange worlds," indeed--one of which is usually named Pandemonium or Inferno, the place in which devils dwell—the devils of Selfishness and Jealousy, and all the nether fiends! And this is the morality of the “ Art of Marriage”, according to this austere moralist. Perfect love which seeketh not its own and aspires only for the supreme welfare of the belovel, is cast out and trodden under foot by this married Diuna.

ideal world than that of the chase and of the battlefield, of orgie and of slaughter ?

No, no. This doctrine will not do.

Letty, instead of having the right to hate Marcella, ought to have only hated her own miserable, little mean self, and to have rejoiced with exceeding joy that her husband had been able to find some one wise and noble enough to teach him those ideal truths without which he would have lost his soul. Marcella had nothing to reproach herself with. It was no doubt quite right that she should do her utmost to make the wretched Letty a nobler and better woman, if only for the sake of Sir George and from considerations of common humanity. But all this remorse, all this nonsense that Letty had a right to hate the woman who helped her husband

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MRS. HUMPHRY WARD'S PARK AT STOCKS.

Rather than allow her husband to learn ideal truths into a higher life, is wrong-woefully wrong. Mrs. Ward from any other woman but herself, she would doom him would bind a burden too grievous to be borne upon the -thinking herself virtuous in so doing—to wander shoulders of the élite of the race. As the penalty for the ignorant and spiritually blind to these truths to the last supreme gift of revealing a vision of the best to the One, day of his life. Surely this is a strange sort of love, she would fling upon the heart and conscience of the hardly indistinguishable from supreme, selfishness! revealer the intolerable obligation of bearing to the grave What law, divine or human, gives wife or husband the the meanness and jealousy of the Other. It is a difficult right to say that the husband or wife shall learn no ideal thing to inspire the life of one; it will be impossible, if it truths from any other man or woman save him or her is never to be undertaken without saddling yourself with whom they have espoused at the altar? The very notion the duty of achieving the salvation of the life of the other. is preposterous and most immoral. Is no woman then And in that case, over the doors of the Temple of Marever to learn the ideal truths, say of religion, save from riage should be inscribed the familiar words, “ Abandon the husband? Is no ignorant man to be allowed to learn hope all ye who enter heru"--all hope, that is, of learning his letters, unless his wife, as ignorant as himself, can ideal or any other of the truths that go to the redemption teach him? And if perchance a woman finds salvation of the human soul, excepting that which each can learn under the personal influence of an apostle, is the savage from the other. For all other teachers of ideal truths, husband justified in hating with fierceness and flame the according to Mrs. Ward, if of the opposite sex, have a missionary who revealed to the wife a higher and more right to be hated with fierceness and fame.

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As thing usin; chiei satic

IN ADVANCE OF THE SELECT COMMITTEE.
HAVE now for the fifth year to prepare the REVIEW board, and it is this that, as a
OF REVIEW'S ANNUAL, which has come to be re process of revelation.

garded as the necessary supplement to the REVIEW I need hardly disclaim the itself. The topic, as in previous years, has been dictated original of Joseph Blastus, for I by the events of the previous twelve months. My first, help him over a very arkan

From the Old World to the New,” pivoted on the watched his career with closerait World's Fair at Chicago; my second, “Two and Two The present phase in his enim make Four," turned on the crash of the Liberator; the more absorbing, and if mio third, “The Splendid Paupers,” on the advent of the with more tragic results that Yellow Man with the White Money as a competitor in which he has passed in his event al English industry; and the fourth, “ Blastus, the King's can be said in the guise of it be Chamberlain,” dealt with the position of the new Colo published in any other shape nial Secretary. This year the topic of the hour compels portance of “The History of a : me to fall back upon Mr. Chamberlain again, in order to in the fact that it will, famille put into its proper setting one episode in the career of many of the friends of this en Blastus which had not been foreseen when I published South Africa, to understand and my last Annual. The title of the Annual is “The much that has hitherto been set History of the Mystery; or, the Skeleton in Blastus's obscurity. Cupboard.” The cover, of which a reduced reproduction appears on this page, will give the reader a fair idea as to the drift of the political romance, the chapters of which, when this number appears, I shall be busily engaged in weaving together into what will, I believe, be a valuable contribution to the history of the inside track of the great recent events in South Africa. The mystery, of course, the history of which is to be explained, and will be explained for the edification of all, is how it came to pass that such stout Imperialists as Mr. Rhodes and Dr. Jameson should have ventured to undertake the 'ominous responsibility of launching their Transvaal adventure without apparently taking any steps whatever to ascertain whether such an enterprise would harmonise with the general policy of the Empire as a whole.

That is the mystery which points to the skeleton in Blastus's cup

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y of the freed ravel and Other Verses.

UR MONTHLY PARCEL OF BOOKS.

SELECT COME

birl, and it is t, SMURTHWAYT,–The autumn rush of

Fixinal of Josephiature," a fair proportion of what is most Felp him over & -season's announcements. Just now there

off aburbing, ed” the first two books, at least, are hardly Lih mure tragic ? eaten, from the point of view of sales, this y lwp said in the ressady. By Mrs. Humphry Ward. Blihel in any of Delicia. By Marie Corelli. 53. t'.e fat that it - its Sorrows. By W. J. Wintle. Is.

ks has fairly commenced. For the wise
r, taking time by the forelock, has already
r
to

escape the deluge of distinctively chance of a good book getting some share ater, all but the most important have to

But in the following list of “volumes nas:

6s. e llice of “The the Midi: an Episode of the French Revolution.

3s. 6d.

**** of revela: I neel harlls

titched his carest se present plus

a.ch he has passei

By Robert Louis

th Africa, to all h that has hitler ei! tr

I have since then contended and rejoiced ;
Amid the glories of the house of life
Profoundly entered, and the shrine beheld :
Yet when the lamp from my expiring eyes
Shall dwindle and recede, the voice of love
Fall insignificant on my closing ears,
What sound shall come but the old cry of the wind
In our inclement city? what return
But the image of the emptiness of youth,
Filled with the sound of footsteps and that voice

Of discontent and rapture and despair ? Mr. Knight's “Victoria, Her Life and Reign," you had from me a month ago. It would make a particularly opportune prize in your village school.

Now to attract your attention at once to two volumes, so small that they may not be noticed, but large with temperament and interest. Who is there who has forgotten “The Sunless Heart," that bitter-sweet firstfruit of the talent of a young Scottish authoress, and the evidence which it afforded of power, originality and intensity of feeling? You will therefore be glad to receive Miss Johnstone's second book, “The Douce Family," which Mr. Fisher Unwin has just published in his Century Library (1s. 6d.). I do not suppose you will like the theme, although it is one that seems to have some attraction for women writers nowadays. We have had novels enough in which the brilliant and clever hero is enslaved by some wanton whose physical charms constitute her sole capital. In “ The Douce Family' the plot is the same, but the rôles are reversed. It is the woman who has the brains and the man the physique. But since Queen Titania loved ass-hea-led Bottom, there was never such an inversion of the fitness of things as the sacrifice by the winsome but wilful Winona at the shrine of such a stupid, vulgar, selfish brute as John Douce. It is a sad story, and the saddest thing about it is that Edith Johnstone should have written it. There is no radiance in “ The Douce Family” to cast a gleam of light over a Suniess Heart.

Mr. Coulson Kerpahan is developing into a veritable Fidei Defensor. In his latest little book " The Child, the Wise Man, and the Desil” (Bowden, ls.), we have a quaint, vivid and striking presentation of the desolation, moral, social and human, which would follow if God wiped out, as a child wipes out an unworked sum from a slate, all that the great name of Jesus means and has meant for humanity: I will not spoil your pleasure in reading Mr. Kernahan's finely conceived vision, but merely commend to you one sentence headed “The Child a Soldier of the Cross.The little child in the arms of Jesus has, says Mr. Kernahan, “struck deadlier blows at the enemies of the Cross than all the arguments of all the theologians. That child is the most powerful foe whom the armies of unbelief have to fear.”

As I suggested just now, there have been quite a number of books owing their appearance to the gangrene in the near East. The largest and the most valuable is “ Turkey and the Armenian Atrocities” (Unwin, 10s. 6d.), the work of a young American missionary, the Rev. Edwin M. Bliss, who has treated his subject with knowledge and ability, Miss Willard commends his work in a brief introduction, and there are several illustrations of a novel character, and a good map. With somewhat different object appears the anonymous “ Historical Sketch of Armenia and the Armenians in

MYE

r Life and Reign: an Illustrated Biography of y A. E. Knight. 33. 6d. 'e read “Sir George Tressady” (Smith and a its unrevised form (for since its serial [rs. Humphry Ward has made considerable s it appeared in the Century, so I need waste referring to it here. Nor need I dilate at Miss Corelli's new story “The Murder of keffington, 5s.), which, like its more recent

has not been sent out to the press—so that able to attack it with appetite unsated with ed detail of a hundred reviews. That this not saved Miss Corelli from her critics is however, by a recent article on “Our Lady of he Saturday. “ The Reds of the Midi," by Varas, deserves the success it has gained. Í ou, with some comment, last month. Mr. Armenia and Its Sorrows" (Melrose, ls.) any means the only book that the crisis forth, as you will see when I come to describe contents of your box, but it is the cheapest | liest, and as it contains a number of illusind a good map, its popularity is well-earned. kor's attempt has been “ to present a concise of the Armenians and their recent sufferings.” At book, “Songs of Travel and Other Verses

5s.), brings a thrill to the lover of literature not likely to be often equalled before the end of sury. Certainly it contains passages that I, for

lll always remember as among the most charming, Ist characteristic, and the most truly beautiful of

fine passages that their author produced. For We, there is that insistent, appealing “ To My Old Cars," which appeared first in a rather obscure

lean annual, with its powerful description of
argb, “our inclement city” :--
-> you remember-can we e'er forget ?--
ow in the coiled perplexities of youth,

our wild climate, in our scowling town, le gloomed and shivered, sorrowed, sobbed and feared ? 'he belching winter wind, the missile rain, "he rare and welcome silence of the snows, The laggard mory, the haggard day, the night, The grimy spell of the nocturnal town, Do you remember?-Ah, could one forget!....

Thegi

I

SOUTH AFRI
THE HISTORY

IN ADVANCE OF THE SELECT COMMITTEE.
HAVE now for the fifth year to prepare the REVIEW board, and it is this that, as my illustration shows, is ir
OF REVIEW'S ANNUAL, which has come to be re process of revelation.

garded as the necessary supplement to the REVIEW I need hardly disclaim the slightest hostility to the itself. The topic, as in previous years, has been dictated original of Joseph Blastus, for I hope the Annual will by the events of the previous twelve months. My first, help him over a very awkward stile.

No one has "From the Old World to the New,” pivoted on the watched his career with closer and more critical interest. World's Fair at Chicago; my second, “Two and Two The present phase in his evolution is one which is make Four," turned on the crash of the Liberator; the more absorbing, and if mismanaged, may be fraught third, “The Splendid Paupers," on the advent of the with more tragic results than any of those through Yellow Man with the White Money as a competitor in which he has passed in his eventful career. A great deal English industry; and the fourth, “ Blastus, the King's can be said in the guise of fiction which could not be Chamberlain," dealt with position of the new Colo published in any other shape, but the political imnial Secretary. This year the topic of the hour compels portance of “ The History of the Mystery” will lie me to fall back upon Mr. Chamberlain again, in order to in the fact that it will, for the first time, enable put into its proper setting one episode in the career of many of the friends of this country, at home and in Blastus which had not been foreseen when I published South Africa, to understand the true inwardness of my last Annual. The title of the Annual is “ The much that has hitherto been shrouded in the densest History of the Mystery; or, the Skeleton in Blastus's obscurity. Cupboard.” The cover, of which a reduced reproduction appears on this page, will give the reader a fair idea as to the drift of the political romance, the chapters of wbich, when this number appears, I shall be busily engaged in weaving together into what will, I believe, be a valuable contribution to the history of the inside track of the great recent events

OR in South Africa. The mystery, of course, the history of which is to be explained, and will be explained for the edification of all, is how it came to pass that such stout Im

BY perialists as Mr. Rhodes and

TEAD. Dr. Jameson should have ventured to undertake the 'ominous responsibility of launching their Transvaal adventure without apparently taking any steps whatever to ascertain whether such an enterprise would harmonise with the general policy of the Empire as a whole.

That is the mystery which points to the skeleton in Blastus's cup

]ISTORY

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REVIEW her 1 REVIEWS

MYSTERY

The Skeleton in POK

Blastus's

Cupboard.

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