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THE BOOK TABLE
A SYSTEM OF PROTECTIVE READING

BY THOMAS L. MASSON

some moment of weakness, be led into this pernicious habit of reading good books you would be immediately cut off

from the society of your kind. If you HAVE noticed recently a concerted is not going on; we must also consort did not acquire the reputation of a highmovement on the part of more or with our neighbors and listen over the brow, you would take on that of a bore;

less respectable friends of mine to telephone; among and between all of those you meet would begin to regard get people generally to read more books. these things, does it also come within you with lack-luster eye, your profits Publishers as a rule, I think I may say our line of duty to read books? One would decline, your family would desert without injury to their feelings, rather sees them around occasionally on tables, you; the world indeed would only be incline to this thought. The book re. reads about them in literary supple paying you back in kind; because you viewers also seem to write more favor- ments, and hears them referred to inti. had discovered something that made you ably of most books than they did. I mately by those who talk as if they had independent of it, it would take its have written several books myself that really read them. But to read them our revenge by drawing away from you; it for some years have failed to attract the selves is quite another matter. The would leave you stranded. attention of an eager public, and which habit is too easy, not to acquire, but to Now the fact is that, however much I should be glad to have issued in new practice. You can read a book any. we may console ourselves with such editions if I could feel reasonably sure where, standing up and sitting down, in mental resources as we have been able that they would not crowd out Shake trains and trolleys. There was a man secretly to develop, none of us quite speare and Milton and other important who acquired a book education by read- likes to be stranded in just this manner. writers who, like myself, are not being ing on horseback. Now that electricity Perhaps in those moments of high rapread so much as of yore. But my main has come in, the danger of reading in ture when the book has wholly "got" purpose is not to further the sale of my bed is reduced to zero; so that if you us we flaunt the world metaphorically, own works, as interesting as they may once break down the barriers and get sitting in our chair in our cozy corner be to some folks who believe they can into the habit of reading you are lost; alone in the house; but, after all, we still borrow money from me, but it is there is nothing you can talk about to are part of our world, whatever it is to call attention to this new book move your friends; they wouldn't know what that has been built up around us; we ment with a view to persuading people you meant., You don't have to go any cannot abjure it in this mediæval here and there to look into it. I really where or do anything; it costs practi- fashion; we must listen to it, cajole and have something of interest and impor. cally nothing; indeed, the amount you be cajoled by it; let it lead us around tance to communicate.

save in carfare each week by not going and accept its rewards and punishments. Of course the danger of taking on any. to places that now you don't want to At least outwardly. And here I come thing more in the intellectual line than go to will buy twice as many books as to my secret. It is wonderful; it is abwe have on hand at present is that it you read. No wonder so many people sorbing; it works; and I fain would let may cramp us in other directions: if instinctively shrink from it; it not only you in on it, if you'll promise not to we get into the habit of reading books, costs too little, but it is an occupation tell. It wouldn't do to have it get out; the movies will feel it, and if the re- that would make them practically ind

that would make them practically inde- this would spoil everything; so I beg of ceipts from the movies should begin to pendent of other entertainments. A des- you to keep it to yourself. If certain drop at this critical time, there's no perate outlook in these paternalistic people I know should find out what I am telling how soon the end will come. The days.

doing, it would ruin me. I am quite railways have gone already; the steel Please believe that I say this not in safe in writing this because they never business isn't feeling over-well; in fact, any mean or derisive spirit, but in all read. And, what is more, they don't without going too much into particu seriousness. If you doubt me, try the suspect that I do; at least they don't lars, about the only thing at present experiment for yourself. Let us say suspect I read in the way I do, but only that seems to stand between us and that you are an average American in the way they think they read, which destruction are the movies. If we Very well. Now the average American -as I have indicated-is not at all. should all begin to stay home even a has recently been declared by an emi. The rule is simple; I never let them see couple of evenings a week and take to nent scientist not to be any further me read, and I never refer to anything reading the Bible and Homer and, say, advanced mentally than an eighteen. I have read. The only thing that reone of my former works that isn't really year-old boy. Well, that is enough. I mains is to tell how the thing can be so bad as they said it was at the time, have an eighteen-year-old boy, and if done. How is it possible for us to conwhere would we be then? This is a you are as far advanced as he thinks he ceal ourselves from others long enough question that we must consider care. is you know it all.

to acquire a habit which, if known, fully. Much as I favor in the abstract And say you start the habit of reading might prove to be fatal? buying a book a week, I realize that a book a week. You can curl up any. It is perfectly easy. All you need do the safety of the Republic requires me where and take a fall out of that book, in the beginning is to get a leather book not to stop too quickly patronizing the and you don't care what happens if it's cover, the outside of which is marked in Gish sisters and Charlie Chaplin.

a good book of course, like “The Tale conspicuous letters "Income Tax ReThen there is the baseball industry, of Two Cities," or "Kim," or "Ivanhoe," ports." You put it over the book you which showed signs of languishing last or "Treasure Island." You settle down read, and there you are. If you are year until somebody discovered it con- after dinner, if you are a married man, reading Rabelais or Stephen Leacock, cealed a worm or so of corruption and with a cigar and the right light over for example, and burst into loud laughit was thus advertised enough to get your shoulder, and just as you've got ter, your sympathetic friend merely back its stride; it would be a pity to settled, even to the ash-tray right at glances at you, shakes his head, and read books and not have time to keep up your elbow, your wife steps up and says, says, “Poor chap! He's only in the with the batting averages, or the names "Come on, dear; it's Norma Talmadge" early stages yet!” He has no feeling of of the principal players, and how much -and what are you going to do about it superiority for you that he might feel, they are getting and what they wear and then?

for example, if he knew you were a bookeat. Then there are golf and tennis and Or maybe you are a business man; try worm. He has been hysterical himself business and other expensive sports quoting "Kim” to a customer, and, not over income-tax reports. which must be maintained. It is neces to be too dignified, see where you get To get on good terms with the best.

THE NEW BOOKS

out danger, by adopting this system preceding and following the outbreak of say that Germany is a land of Schiewill be found an easy task. As you ac- the American Revolution. The horrors

bers. quire more skill, you will naturally turn of the Indian and Tory raids are de Crossing the frontier into Poland, we to other subjects for protection than scribed with historical accuracy and find that the distinguished ex-Premier the income-tax reports; you may become dramatic intensity. The love story in- of that country is still apparently as intimate with Milton and Dante under cluded stands out delightfully before much of a national idol as ever. The the alluring legend of “Our Annual Seed this historic background.

author tells us that Paderewski has lost Catalogue," "Film Favorites,” “Baseball

neither his popularity nor his influence. VISION HOUSE. By C. N. and A. M. WilliamRecords,” and so forth. Also, at com

son. The George H. Doran Company, New

In fact, Mr. Roberts adds in his slapparatively slight expense, you can ac York. $1.90.

dash, slangy fashion: “Anybody who quire a set of covers in sizes to fit As in earlier stories by these authors, says that Paderewski hasn't the love almost any book, from the Temple Edi- the interest of travel and sightseeing is and the admiration of the entire Polish tion of Shakespeare to a quarto of here combined with that of romance. nation is talking through his hat as Plutarch.

The hero is introduced as "the only well as through his overcoat and It is only necessary to conclude with American V. C.," although the fact goloshes." The reader who seeks infora word of caution to the wise. As your seems to be that he was really a British mation about Paderewski must read liberal education, thus screened from subject, and therefore technically, as fifty-five pages to get it; the book has the outside world, grows in importance, well as by merit, entitled to receive the no index. But all the chapters are a corresponding measure of self-control Victoria Cross. The tale has its im- worth reading even if the text is repewill be necessary. The temptation is probabilities, but it is exciting and titious and its wit crude. often great to disclose your secret. readable.

ESSAYS AND CRITICISM Eternal restraint is the price of liberty.

TYRANNY OF THE COUNTRYSIDE (THE). Keep mum. If your friends should sud

MUSIC, PAINTING, AND OTHER ARTS

By F. E. Green. The Labor Publishing denly become aware that you are well HISTORY AND METHODS OF ANCIENT AND

MODERN PAINTING. By James Ward.

Company, Ltd., London. read, your doom would be sealed. Think

Vol. IV. Illustrated. E. P. Dutton & Co.,

The conditions that make the British of the educated people we shun because New York. $6.

farm laborer and village worker dissatisthey are so indiscreet as to talk of what This volume is of particular value to fied with their lot are feelingly and they read!

lovers of Venetian painting. More than forcibly presented in this unusually half of the text comprises a discussion plain-spoken book. Rarely has "Hodge's" of the painters of Venice from the case been more effectively presented. Bellinis down. The rest of the book

SCIENCE tells us much about the painters from

NEW STONE AGE (THE). By Harrison E. FICTION other Italian centers. The author's

Howe. Illustrated. (The Century Books of ('OME BACK (THE). By Carolyn Wells. style, while clear and compact, is not Useful Science.) The Century Company, The George H. Doran Company, New York. particularly magnetic.

New York. $3. $1.90.

"The New Stone Age" is the age of Another tale about Miss Wells's two MODERN TENDENCIES IN SCULPTURE. By cement and concrete. This volume dis

Lorado Taft. Illustrated. The University girl detectives. The story of crime and

of Chicago Press, Chicago. $5.

cusses the raw material necessary for detection is combined with psychic mys. This work by a sculptor who is also a

the different types and explains the teries.

critic of wide knowledge and facile preparation involved; it tells about the HOUSE WITH THE GOLDEN WINDOWS power of expression will be valued by all parts which chemistry and other

(THE). By J. E. Buckrose. The George art-loving Americans. The wealth of sciences play in cement and concrete

H. Doran Company, New York. $1.90. illustration (there are over four hun- and scientifically sets forth just wha Mrs. Buckrose is always gentle and dred pictures)

nakes tl

happens when these materials set and agreeable in her stories of English

tremely useful to readers who, after harden. Finally, it informs us concerncountry life. This is, however, not one enjoying Professor Taft's luminous com- ing the various uses of cement and conof the strongest of her novels.

ments, wish to form their own judgment crete. IN HIS OWN IMAGE. By Mary Briarly. The as to the recent developments in sculp

Macmillan Company, New York. $2.23. ture which are so fully treated in the BOOKS RECEIVED This novel treats industrial subjects, book.

FICTION and especially the place of women in

HISTORY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY

BRASSBOUNDER (THE). By David W. Bone. industrial life, with care and thought. EUROPE'S MORNING AFTER. By Kenneth L.

E. P. Dutton & Co., New York. $2. fulness. It is correctly described by the Roberts. Harper & Brothers, New York. $3. FOUR CORNERS. By Clifford Raymond. The publishers as "a story of American life Literally, “Schieber" is "one who George H. Doran Company, New York. and the development of the freedom of shoves." The Germans, it seems, now

$1.90. American women as they are com apply the name Schieber to the man

TOO OLD FOR DOLLS. By Anthony M. Ludo

vici. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York. $2. plicated by the labor problem."

who makes money unjustifiably, who
gets something at a low price and

HISTORY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY PROFITEERS (THE). By E. Phillips Oppen

('ASE OF KOREA (THE). By Henry Chung. heim. Little, Brown & Co., Boston. $2. "shoves" it along to some one else at a

A.M., Ph.D. Foreword by Hon. Selden P. If the stories of mystery, crime, and

high price. Mr. Kenneth Roberts, an Spencer. The Fleming H. Revell Company.

acute, unconventional, and very infor. New York. $3. detection written in such abundance by Mr. Oppenheim were to be ranked acmative observer, says:

TRAVEL AND DESCRIPTION cording to their merit and interest, we He is a man who cheats by dealing ANNALS AND ANTIQUITIES OF RAJASTHAN:

OR, THE CENTRAL AND WESTERN in goods in which he is not legitiare afraid that the present example

RAJPUT STATES OF INDIA. By Lieut.. would stand pretty near the end of the mately entitled to deal, such as flour

Col. James Tod. 3 vols. The Oxford Uai. and bread and sugar and meat. list.

versity Press, New York. These goods are supposed to be under LITTLE RED FOOT (THE). By Robert W. Government control so that every

RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY Chambers. The George H. Doran Company, body can have an equal amount. But

IN HIS STEPS TO-DAY. By Charles M. ShelNew York. $1.90. the Schieber sells them

don. The Fleming H. Revell Company, New at a high

York. $1.25.
It is refreshing to turn from Mr. price to those who are unwilling to
Chambers's later novels and remember
subsist on a Government ration. ...

MISCELLANEOUS that in his earlier literary career he

If the Schieber cheats by selling at a IMMIGRANT HEALTH AND THE COMMUwrote one of the best American histori. profit the foodstuffs which he is not

NITY. By Michael M. Davis, Jr. Ameri. supposed to sell, then there are hun

canization Studies. Harper & Brothers, cal stories, "Cardigan." In his new dreds of thousands of people in Ger

New York, book he carries on the story of the

many cheating by purchasing from

MESSAGE OF SADHU SUNDAR SINGH (THE). agitation and fighting in New York be. the Schieber the food that they are

By B. H. Streeter, M.A., and A. J. Ap

pasamy. B.A. The Macmillan Company. *ween Albany and Canada in the days not supposed to eat. ... Therefore I

New York. $1.75.

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FOUND INDUSTRY GROPING the industry might still be groping One cannot study the woolen in. along the byways where he found it. dustry without looking deeply into He found the industry utterly disthe work of the American Woolen organized. Mill was fighting mill in Company-not because this organi- his native New England hills. It was zation controls most of the American a struggle for labor, for wool, for woolen industry; it does not—but equipment, for competent overseers, because the American Woolen Com- for capital, for distribution of the pany found out how to fit its stride finished product. There was incredto the enormous needs of modernible waste. Cost of production knowltimes and showed other mills how. times and showed other mills how edge was non-existent. Wages were And one cannot study the American low, cost of finished weaves high, Woolen Company without studying working and sanitary conditions the character of Mr. Wood. For, bad. Co-ordination and team-work while he could leave his desk to between mills were unknown. In morrow for a long absence and know their place were suspicion and interthat the work would go right along mill conflict. The finer weaves all without a bitch, there would be no had to come from Engla American Woolen Company if it had ever even taken the trouble to were not for William M. Wood, and make a survey of the facts of pro

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ERE'S where some of the mill-hands live," said the taxidriver."

" What millhands ?”

“ Wood Worsted, the big mill you see over there."

Through the gray spring drizzle that was descending upon Lawrence came the clean sparkle of a delight ful region of Colonial homes. From their Aower-beds came a wet fra grance; their lattice-work was covered with vines.

"How do you people of Lawrence feel toward Mr. Wood ?”' we asked, curious to know what the big Massachusetts mill town thought of the master of its industrial destinies.

“I see by the papers that he made $125,000 out of his mills last year. I'm no Anarchist or Socialist. But that's too much for any man to make.”

How near right the driver's figures were I don't know. But judging from Mr. Wood's industrial value to the country, I should think his services would be cheap at ten times that figure.

We were on our way to Shawsheen Village, midway between Lawrence and Andover, to learn something more about the American Woolen Company and its founder. There is something strange and elusive about him. History has more to say of many a lesser figure than will probably ever be recorded about William M. Wood. Yet his influence impinges upon human life at perhaps more points of contact than the influence of any other big industrial leader we bave. What Harriman did for railroading, what Rockefeller did for oil, what Gary did for steel, William M. Wood has done for wool.

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out danger, by adopting this system preceding and following the outbreak of say that Germany is a land of Schiewill be found an easy task. As you ac- the American Revolution. The horrors bers. quire more skill, you will naturally turn of the Indian and Tory raids are de Crossing the frontier into Poland, we to other subjects for protection than scribed with historical accuracy and find that the distinguished ex-Premier the income-tax reports; you may become dramatic intensity. The love story in of that country is still apparently as intimate with Milton and Dante under cluded stands out delightfully before much of a national idol as ever. The the alluring legend of “Our Annual Seed this historic background.

author tells us that Paderewski has lost Catalogue," "Film Favorites," "Baseball VISION HOUSE. By C. N. and A. M. William

neither his popularity nor his influence. Records," and so forth. Also, at com.

son. The George H. Doran Company, New

In fact, Mr. Roberts adds in his slapparatively slight expense, you can ac York. $1.90.

dash, slangy fashion: “Anybody who quire a set of covers in sizes to fit As in earlier stories by these authors. says that Paderewski hasn't the love almost any book, from the Temple Edi- the interest of travel and sightseeing is and the admiration of the entire Polish tion of Shakespeare to a quarto of here combined with that of romance. nation is talking through his hat as Plutarch,

The hero is introduced as "the only well as through his overcoat and It is only necessary to conclude with American V. C.," although the fact goloshes." The reader who seeks infora word of caution to the wise. As your seems to be that he was really a British mation about Paderewski must read liberal education, thus screened from subject, and therefore technically, as fifty-five pages to get it; the book has the outside world, grows in importance, well as by merit, entitled to receive the no index. But all the chapters are a corresponding measure of self-control Victoria Cross. The tale has its im- worth reading even if the text is repewill be necessary. The temptation is probabilities, but it is exciting and titious and its wit crude. often great to disclose your secret. readable.

ESSAYS AND CRITICISM Eternal restraint is the price of liberty.

MUSIC, PAINTING, AND OTHER ARTS

TYRANNY OF THE COUNTRYSIDE (THE). Keep mum. If your friends should sud

By F. E. Green. TheLabor Publishing denly become aware that you are well HISTORY AND METHODS OF ANCIENT AND

Company, Ltd., London.

MODERN PAINTING. By James Ward. read, your doom would be sealed. Think

Vol. IV. Illustrated. E. P. Dutton & Co.,

The conditions that make the British of the educated people we shun because New York. $6.

farm laborer and village worker dissatisthey are so indiscreet as to talk of what This volume is of particular value to fied with their lot are feelingly and they read!

lovers of Venetian painting. More than forcibly presented in this unusually half of the text comprises a discussion plain-spoken book. Rarely has “Hodge's"

of the painters of Venice from the case been more effectively presented. THE NEW BOOKS Bellinis down. The rest of the book

SCIENCE tells us much about the painters from

NEW STONE AGE (THE). By Harrison E. FICTION other Italian centers. The author's

Howe. Dlustrated. (The Century Books of COME BACK (THE). By Carolyn Wells. style, while clear and compact, is not Useful Science.) The Century Company, The George H. Doran Company, New York. particularly magnetic.

New York. $3. $1.90.

"The New Stone Age" is the age of Another tale about Miss Wells's two MODERN TENDENCIES IN SCULPTURE. By

Lorado Taft. Illustrated. The University

cement and concrete. This volume disgirl detectives. The story of crime and

of Chicago Press, Chicago. $5.

cusses the raw material necessary for detection is combined with psychic mys

This work by a sculptor who is also a the different types and explains the teries.

critic of wide knowledge and facile preparation involved; it tells about the HOUSE WITH THE GOLDEN WINDOWS power of expression will be valued by all parts which chemistry and other

(THE). By J. E. Buckrose. The George art-loving Americans. The wealth of sciences play in cement and concrete H. Doran Company, New York. $1.90.

illustration (there are over four hun- and scientifically sets forth just what Mrs. Buckrose is always gentle and dred pictures) makes the book ex. happens when these materials set and agreeable in her stories of English tremely useful to readers who, after harden. Finally, it informs us concerncountry life. This is, however, not one

enjoying Professor Taft's luminous com ing the various uses of cement and conof the strongest of her novels.

ments, wish to form their own judgment crete. IN HIS OWN IMAGE. By Mary Briarly. The

as to the recent developments in sculpMacmillan Company, New York. $2.25. ture which are so fully treated in the BOOKS RECEIVED This novel treats industrial subjects, book.

FICTION and especially the place of women in

HISTORY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY BRASSBOUNDER (THE). By David W. Bone industrial life, with care and thought.

EUROPE'S MORNING AFTER. By Kenneth L. E. P. Dutton & Co., New York. $2. fulness. It is correctly described by the Roberts. Harper & Brothers, New York. $3.

FOUR CORNERS. By Clifford Raymond. The publishers as "a story of American life Literally, “Schieber" is "one who George H. Doran Company, New York. and the development of the freedom of shoves.” The Germans, it seems, now

$1.90. American women as they are com apply the name Schieber to the man

TOO OLD FOR DOLLS. By Anthony M. Ludo

vici. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York. $2. plicated by the labor problem."

who makes money unjustifiably, who
gets something at a low price and

HISTORY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY PROFITEERS (THE). By E. Phillips Oppenheim.

CASE OF KOREA (THE). By Henry Chung. "shoves" it along to some one else at a Little, Brown & Co., Boston. $2.

A.M., Ph.D. Foreword by Hon. Selden P. If the stories of mystery, crime, and

high price. Mr. Kenneth Roberts, an Spencer. The Fleming H. Revell Company, detection written in such abundance by

acute, unconventional, and very infor New York. $3. Mr. Oppenheim were to be ranked acmative observer, says:

TRAVEL AND DESCRIPTION cording to their merit and interest, we He is a man who cheats by dealing

ANNALS AND ANTIQUITIES OF RAJASTHAN;

OR, THE CENTRAL AND WESTERN in goods in which he is not legiti. are afraid that the present example would stand pretty near the end of the mately entitled to deal, such as flour

RAJPUT STATES OF INDIA. By Lleut

Col. James Tod. 3 vols. The Oxford Uniand bread and sugar and meat. list.

versity Press, New York. These goods are supposed to be under LITTLE RED FOOT (THE). By Robert W. Government control so that every

RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY Chambers. The George H. Doran Company, body can have an equal amount. But

IN HIS STEPS TO-DAY. By Charles M. ShelNew York. $1.90. the Schieber sells them at a high

don. The Fleming H. Revell Company, New Mr. It is refreshing to turn from price to those who are unwilling to

York. $1.25. Chambers's later novels and remember subsist on a Government ration. ...

MISCELLANEOUS that in his earlier literary career he

If the Schieber cheats by selling at a IMMIGRANT HEALTH AND THE COMMUprofit the foodstuffs which he is not

NITY. By Michael M. Davis, Jr. Ameriwrote one of the best American histori. supposed to sell, then there are hun

canization Studies, Harper & Brothers. cal stories, “Cardigan." In his new dreds of thousands of people in Ger

New York. book he carries on the story of the

many cheating by purchasing from MESSAGE OF SADHU SUNDAR SINGH (THE), agitation and fighting in New York be. the Schieber the food that they are

By B. H. Streeter, M.A., and A. J. Ap

pasamy, B.A. The Macmillan Company. tween Albany and Canada in the days not supposed to eat. . . . Therefore I

New York. $1.75.

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed]

ERE'S where some FOUND INDUSTRY GROPING the industry might still be groping of the mill-hands One cannot study the woolen in. along the byways where he found it. live," said the taxi dustry without looking deeply into He found the industry utterly disdriver.”

the work of the American Woolen organized. Mill was fighting mill in " What mill. Company-not because this organi- his native New England hills. It was hands ?”

zation controls most of the American a struggle for labor, for wool, for “Wood Worsted, woolen industry; it does not—but equipment, for competent overseers, the big mill you see over there." because the American Woolen Com- for capital, for distribution of the

Through the gray spring drizzle pany found out how to fit its stride finished product. There was incredthat was descending upon Lawrence to the enormous needs of modern ible waste. Cost of production knowlcame the clean sparkle of a delight times and showed other mills how. edge was non-existent. Wages were ful region of Colonial homes. From And one cannot study the American low, cost of finished weaves high, their flower-beds came a wet fra Woolen Company without studying

Woolen Company without studying working and sanitary conditions grance; their lattice-work was coy. the character of Mr. Wood. For, bad. Co-ordination and team-work ered with vines.

while he could leave his desk to between mills were unknown. In “How do you people of Lawrence morrow for a long absence and know

morrow for a long absence and know their place were suspicion and interfeel toward Mr. Wood ?” we asked, that the work would go right along mill conflict. The finer weaves all curious to know what the big Massa- without a bitch, there would be no

without a hitch, there would be no had to come from England. No one chusetts mill town thought of the American Woolen Company if it had ever even taken the trouble to master of its industrial destinies. were not for William M. Wood, and make a survey of the facts of pro

“I see by the papers that he made $125,000 out of his mills last year. I'm no Anarchist or Socialist. But that's too much for any man to make.”

How near right the driver's figures were I don't know. But judging from Mr. Wood's industrial value to the country, I should think his services would be cheap at ten times that figure.

We were on our way to Shawsheen Village, midway between Lawrence and Andover, to learn something more about the American Woolen Company and its founder. There is something strange and elusive about bim. History has more to say of many a lesser figure than will probably ever be recorded about William M. Wood. Yet his influence impinges upon human life at perhaps more points of contact than the influence of any other big industrial leader we have. What Harriman did for rail. roading, what Rockefeller did for oil, what Gary did for steel, William In every street crowd in the civilized world are suits of clothes made of American M. Wood bas done for wool.

Woolen Company fabrics

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