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good works of very different kinds are: A History of the Civil War in the United States (1905), by W. Birkbeck Wood and Major J. E. Edmonds, and A History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850, 8 vols. (1893–1919), by James Ford Rhodes. The first is military, the second political. Mr. Rhodes has also written a single volume History of the Civil War (1917). American Campaigns by Major M. F. Steele, issued under the supervision of the War Department (1909), deals chiefly with the military operations of the Civil War.

The naval side of this, as of all other wars, has been far too much neglected. But that great historian of sea-power, Admiral Mahan, has told the best of the story in his Admiral Farragut (1892).

An interesting contemporary account of the war will be found in the five volumes of Appleton's American Annual Cyclopædia for the years from 1861 to 1865. B. J. Lossing's Pictorial History of the Civil War, 3 vols. (1866–69), and Harper's Pictorial History of the Rebellion, 2 vols. (1868), give graphic pictures of military life as seen by contemporaries. Personal reminiscences of the war, of varying merit, have multiplied rapidly in recent years. These are appraised for the unwary reader in the bibliographies already mentioned. Frank Wilkeson's Recollections of a Private Soldier in the Army of the Potomac (1887), George C. Eggleston's A Rebel's Recollections (1905), and Mrs. Mary B. Chestnut's Diary from Dixie (1905) are among the best of these personal recollections.

The political and diplomatic history has been dealt with already in the two preceding Chronicles. Abraham Lincoln: a History, by John G. Nicolay and John Hay, in ten volumes (1890), and The Complete Works of Abraham Lincoln, in twelve volumes (1905), form the quarry from which all true accounts of his war statesmanship must be built up. Lord Charnwood's Abraham Lincoln (1917) is an admirable summary. To these titles should be added Gideon Welles's Diary, 3 vols. (1911), and, on the Confederate side, Jefferson Davis's The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, 2 vols. (1881), and Alexander H. Stephens's A Constitutional View of the Late War Between the States, 2 vols. (1870). The best life of Jefferson Davis is that by William E. Dodd in the American Crisis Biographies (1907). W. H. Russell's My Diary North and South (1863) records the impressions of an intelligent foreign observer.

The present Chronicle is based entirely on the original evidence, with the convenient use only of such works as have themselves been written by qualified experts directly from the original evidence.

INDEX

69,

Alabama, secedes, 56; in 1864, Aquia, McClellan's troops at,
335; threatened, 336

228-29, 231, 234
Alabama, Confederate raider, Archer, J. T., Confederate

69, 70, 311-12; Kearsarge brigadier, 298
and,

313-17; and Arizona, “War in the West,"
Hatteras, 69, 115

165
Albatross, ship, 265

Arkansas secedes, 56
Albemarle, Confederate ram, Arkansas, Confederate ram,

Cushing destroys, 303, 318– 109
319

Arkansas Post, capture of,
Albemarle Sound, command 164
lost, 93

Arlington, home of General
Alexandria (Louisiana), State Lee, 19

Seminary of Learning and Armstrong, Commodore, at
Military Academy, 6–7

Pensacola, 4
Allatoona (Georgia), Johnston Army, Confederate, Act pro-

evacuates, 348; Corse's de- viding for enlistment, 11-12;
fense of, 369-70

at Harper's Ferry, 21-22;
“Anaconda policy,” 184

Jackson and, 21-22, 23–24;
Anderson, Colonel Charles, lack of equipment, 63, 244;
quotes Lee, 11

advantages, 76–77;
Anderson, Major Robert, com- scription, 78; munitions, 78;

mands at Fort Moultrie, 2; relations with Federals at
at Fort Sumter, 3, 12-15; Vicksburg, 276; Army of
surrender, 15; leaves Fort Northern Virginia, 336; un-
Sumter, 16; appointed to renewable wastage, 355;
Kentucky command, 29; number of troops (1865),

superseded by Sherman, 120 380; Lee's farewell to, 393
Annapolis, Union troops at, Army, Federal, enlistments,
17

33; Congress votes troops
Antietam (Maryland), battle, and money, 34, 40; McDow-
178, 245–46, 292

ell's, 39–40; regulars in, 79;
Apache Cañon, fight in, 166 number of troops, 79-80;
Appomattox Court House conscription, 81; organi-
(Virginia), Lee's surrender, zation, 82; Grant's (1862),
327, 389

148; Army of the Cumber-
Appomattox Station, Custer land, 164, 279; Army of the
raids, 388

Mississippi, 160; Army of

con-

Army, Federal-Continued

the Ohio, 160, 279; well
equipped, 244; Army of the
Potomac, 254–55, 287, 334,
336, 351, 354, 356; Army of
the Tennessee, 160, 260, 280,
358; Army of Virginia, 227,
243; relations with Con-
federates at Vicksburg, 276;
Army of the James, 334, 336,
340, 356; reviewed in Wash-

ington, 395
Army Act, Provisional Con-

federate Congress passes,

11-12
Ashby, Turner, Confederate
cavalry leader,

leader, 205; at
Harrisonburg, 207; Valley

raid, 212; death, 215-16
Ashby's Gap, Johnston crosses

Blue Ridge at, 45
Ashland (Virginia), Jackson

at, 223
Atlanta, Southern

made at, 64; Northern ob-
jective, 327, 336; battle,
358–59; Sherman announces
fall of, 361; effect of victory,
364; Sherman's headquar-
ters, 366-67; last action near,

968–70
Atlanta, Confederate ram cap-

tured by Weehawken, 309
Ave: ell, W. W., cavalry leader,

355, 357

cannon

on the Mississippi (1862),
113, 114, 167; (1863), 261,
264-65, 272, 273; commands
in Shenandoah Valley, 198;
in Shenandoah campaign,
199, 200, 203, 204, 205, 207,
208, 210, 211, 212, 235; in-
capacity, 261, 265, 273; com-
mands Red River Expedi-

tion, 318, 329, 330, 337, 338
Barrancas Barracks, 3
Bartow, General F. S., Bull

Run, 48; killed, 52
Baton Rouge, Union Arsenal

at, 6; Farragut captures,
107; Confederate attack,
110; Union Navy wins way

to, 117
“Battle above the Clouds,”

Lookout Mountain, 284
Baylor, Captain J. R., pro-

claims himself Governor of

New Mexico, 165-66
Beauregard, General P. G. T.,

sons at Louisiana Military
Academy, 7; and Fort Sum-
ter, 12, 15-16; on the Poto-
mac, 35; at Bull Run, 36, 45,
49; preparation for Shiloh,
146, 147; battle of Shiloh,
153–54; Corinth, 156; and
Confederate plans, 195;
attacks Butler, 340; tele-
gram to Lee, 348–49; com-
mand of troops opposed to

Sherman, 371
Beauregard, Fort, 92
Beaver Dam Creek (Virginia),

Porter's front at Mechanics-

ville, 223
Bee, General B. E., Bull Run,

49; killed, 52
Bell, Commodore H. H., 99,

114
Belmont (Missouri), Grant

attacks, 92, 121
Benjamin, J. P., Confederate

Secretary of War, 70, 101,
182

Bailey, Colonel Joseph, 330
Bailey, Captain Theodorus, 100
Balloons, 63
Baltimore, Secessionists at

Fort Sumter, 3; Massa-
chusetts troops mobbed in,
16; Jackson's plan to occupy,

194
Baltimore and Ohio Railway,

Jackson destroys workshop,

37
Banks, General N. P., super-

sedes General Butler, 113;

Brandy Station (Virginia),

cavalry combat at, 288
Brentwood (Tennessee), Scho-

field at, 371

Benton, flagship, 266
Bentonville (North Carolina),

battle, 382-83
Bering Sea, Shenandoah in, 69
Bermuda Hundred (Virginia),

Butler seizes, 339
Beverly (West Virginia), Con-

federates retire to, 30
Big Black River (Mississippi),

Grant's victory at, 271
Birge, H. W., and sharp-

shooters, 133
Bixby, Mrs., letter to, 190-

191
Blackburn's Ford (Virginia),

McDowell at, 43, 46
Blair, General F. P., fight for

Missouri, 25, 26, 27, 57,
131; as a general, 261
Blockade, declared, 16; effec-

tiveness, 84, 91-92, 113, 244,
280; blockade-runners, 91-
92, 307-08; on Mississippi,
93; attempts to break, 308-
309, 318; double line neces-

sary, 308

Bloody Angle, salient in Spot-

sylvania action, 343, 344
Bonham, General M. L., Bull

Run, 48
Boonville (Missouri), battle,

28, 118
Boston Mountains, Confeder-

ates hold, 142
Bowling Green (Kentucky),

Johnston at, 124, 129; John-

ston abandons, 141
Brackett, Colonel A. G.,

quoted, 10-11
Bragg, General Braxton, 287,

325–26; at Baton Rouge, 6;
preparations for Shiloh, 146;
succeeds Beauregard, 161;
invasion of Kentucky, 161,
162, 243; march on Nash-
ville, 164; sends out Morgan,
278; Chickamauga, 279;
Chattanooga, 281, 305; Mis-
sionary Ridge, 282, 283

Brice's Cross Roads (Missis-

sippi), Forrest defeats Stur-

gis at, 357
Bristoe Station (Virginia),

bridge burned, 233
Brooklyn, fight with Manassas,

102; against Fort Morgan,

322
Brown, John, 20, 130
Brown, J. E., Governor of

Georgia, 78, 367–68
Bruinsburg (Louisiana), Grant

lands force at, 267, 268
Buchanan, Commodore Frank-

lin, 87
Buckingham, General C. P.,

and McClellan, 248
Buckner, General S. B., as a

general, 136; Fort Donelson,
138; surrender, 139, 140;

and Grant, 140
Buell, General D.C., commands

in West, 122; and Halleck,
123; preparations for Shiloh,
146, 148, 149; battle of
Shiloh, 153, 154; commands
Army of the Ohio, 160; end

of service, 162
Buford, John, cavalry leader

at Gettysburg, 293, 295,

296, 297, 298
Bull Run, First campaign, 33,

84, 171, 172, 181, 193; pub-
lic clamor for action, 34, 39-
40; disposition of forces, 34–
35, 36; Confederate problem,
36–37; Falling Waters, 38–
39; Federal preparations,
41-43; Blackburn's Ford, 43;
McDowell advances,
Confederate preparations
and plans, 44-46; Federal
advance, 47; Confederate
rout, 48–49; Confederates
rally, 49–50; Stuart's charge,

44;

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