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TABLE No. 2.--POSTAL SERVICE. Showing the number of examinations held, with class, average age, education, the number passing at 65 per cent. or over, average age, education, and the num

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ber appointed.

Clorks, mes

Average

Age.

sengers, &c.

Names of post-offices.

Number examina

tions held.

Female.

Carriers.

Clerks.

In common

schools.

Carriers.

Total.

Male.

Total

288 1,536 3, 233

29 2,652

TABLE No. 3.-CUSTOMS SERVICE.

Statement showing the number of examinations held, the number eramined, class, arerage age,

education; number passing at 65 or upwards, education and the number appointed.

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This table shows the apportionment of five hundred places among the several States and Territories on the basis of population; the left-hand column stating the number falling to each State and Territory and the other column the number of appointments which has actually been made from each State and Territory under the civil service act.

The act allows no reference to the old quota or apportionment which esisted when it was passed. The excess of appointments from the District of Columbia and from Maryland was unavoidable in the early stages of the work of the Commission, and arose mainly from the difficulty of providing persons hav. ing the technical knowledge needed in places for which special exam. inations are held. The Commission has provided for examinations tended to prevent this excess in the future.

There was a separate apportionment of eighty-nine persons appointed in the Pension Office, for which see Table No. 5.

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TABLE. No. 6.

Statement showing (1) the number of officers in the several Erecutive Departments at Washington appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate ; (2) the number not subject to confirmation, whose compensation exceeds $1,800 per annum, and (3) the number excepted from camination under Rule XIX.

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APPENDIX No. 7. The following are specimen sets of the questions used in some of the examinations held under the rules :

DEPARTMENTAL.-SERIES No. 6.-LIMITED EXAMINATION.

(First subject.)

Question 1. One of the examiners will read so distinctly that each person being examined can hear him, one of the exercises for dictation accompanying these papers. In general not more than fifteen oreighteen words per minute should be read, nor more than five or six words with. out pause. Give the sense as much as possible, and be sure that all can hear. Allow two minutes at the close for punctuation.

(TO APPLICANT. Write as much as you can of the passage read. If from any cause you miss a word, do not pause, but go on with the next words you hear. Write clearly and spell correctly.)

Question 2. Copy the following precisely:

66 The amount of the funded debt redeemable at any time before September 1, 1891, wbich will remain unpaid on the 30th of June, 1883, is about $300,000,000, and upon the foregoing estimates for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1883, the whole funded debt now redeemable could be paid before June 30, 1886. This would leave as the surplus for more than five years the amount of $600,000,000 undisposed of in the Treasury, unless, yielding to the temptation of seeming wealth, expenditures be largely increased. The amount of the loan redeemable in 1891 is only $250,000,000, and, as has been stated, no other loan becomes redermable until 1907, so that the surplus under the conditions supposed will rapidly increase until that date. The amount of the loan of 1907, as already appears, is less than $740,000,000, so that, were it all redeemable, the whole public debt could be paid from a surplus as great as estimated early in the fiscal year ending June 30, 1894.”——(Report of the Secretary of the Treasury, 1882.)

Question 3. Write the following words, spelling them correctly: buisnes excede

achevement seperate prescious

reccomendasion beauro leekage

beleive charaty emenate

registerred storeage ocasion

tonage guager prinseple

abcense

(Second subject.)

Question 1. During the fiscal year 1884 the exportation of cotton from certain American ports was as follows: New Orleans, 703,698,018 pounds; Baltimore, 84,620,654 pounds; New York, 278,358,580 pounds; Yorktown, 11,208,246 pounds; Galveston, 190,574,067 pounds. What was the total number of pounds exported from the ports named ?

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