Montana Myths and Legends: The True Stories behind History’s Mysteries

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2016 M06 5 - 156 pages
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Tales of intrigue in this book include unusual unsolved crimes, unidentified flying objects, spine-tingling ghost stories, well-documented sea creature sightings, and more. Based on historic accounts from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Montana Myths and Legends recounts several myths and mysteries from the Big Sky State's past, verifying some tales from multiple accounts and exposing some stories for what may have really occurred.

From a haunted prison in Red Lodge to persistent rumors of bigfoot appearances, from whispered descriptions of the "tommyknockers" who help miners in trouble to a famous union organizer found lynched from a bridge in Butte, this selection of fourteen stories from Montana's past explores some of the Treasure State's most compelling mysteries and debunks some of its most famous myths.
 

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Contents

What Happened to Meriwethers Boat?
1
Meriwether Lewiss Canine Companion May Never Have Left Montana
14
A Mummy and the Little People
26
Did Governor Meagher Go Swimming? Or Was He Drowned?
34
Was Frank Little Murdered by a Cop?
46
Is the Mystery of the Easton Murder Solved?
56
Was Sheriff Henry Plummer a Highway Robber?
61
The Mysterious Disappearance of the Whitehead Brothers
71
If Bigfoot Exists He Needs a Shower
102
Who Named the Crazy Mountains?
110
Meet Flessie the Monster of Flathead Lake
115
There Are Ghosts in the Butte Archives Arent There?
123
Epilogue
136
Bibliography
141
Index
148
About the Authors
154

Is There a Connection Between UFOs and Cattle Mutilations?
88

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About the author (2016)

As a child, Ed Lawrence's goal was to become Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. However, after flunking out of a pre-law program at the University of Oregon he abandoned that plan and studied literature instead. Then followed a long stint in the corporate world as a marketing type before he experienced life–change #3 and became a writer and photographer. Along the way he took up flyfishing as a hobby, and now combines his passion for flyfishing with writing for major magazines. He also authored Frommer's Guide to Montana and Wyoming, and Frommer's Guide to Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. He lives in Bozeman, Montana.

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