Page images
PDF
EPUB
[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

ST. PAUL, MINN.

1. Nedra. McCutcheon. (Dodd, Mead & Co.) $1.50.

2. The House of Mirth. Wharton. (Scribner.) $1.50.

3. The Gambler.

Thurston.

(Harper.) $1.50. 4. The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary. Warner. (Little, Brown & Co.) $1.50.

5.

My Friend the Chauffeur. Williamson. (McClure, Phillips & Co.) $1.50.

6.

The Man of the Hour. Thanet. (BobbsMerrill Co.) $1.50.

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic]
[graphic][subsumed]
[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

THE

BOOKMAN

A Magazine of Literature and Life

JANUARY, 1906

CHRONICLE AND COMMENT

Beginning with the present number, THE BOOKMAN will devote certain of its pages to the discussion of educational topics and educational books. This new department will comprise a leading article on some subject of immediate educational interest, preferably one that is a matter of debate; reviews of important educational books selected by writers appointed to follow the publications in their respective fields, and finally, a summary, with critical comment, of all the educational books received since the last issue.

conclusions. It seems no longer possible for a publishing house to push any book to a sale of great magnitude through sheer exploitation. Then, too, there is more evidence of the individual note. A writer must tell his or her own story, for the novel made to recipe, whether it be of the American Revolution School, or the Rural or B'gosh School, or the After the Method of Dumas School, is no longer in demand. Although, with a few exceptions, it has not found a place among the best sellers, the novel of the last year or two has been the Business Novel. In a broad sense, the business novel is as old as Cæsar Biroteau; in its narrower interpretation it belongs to the last twenty-four or thirty months of American fiction.

A New
Department.

This is now the sixth year in which we have devoted several paragraphs of our January issue to a survey of the popular fiction of the previous twelve months. In a general way what we said in January, 1901, of the books of 1900, and what we have been obliged to repeat with some slight verbal changes ever since will do perfectly well for 1905. In short, the year has produced nothing astonishing. There have been a great many admirable stories; a number of books have been read to an extent highly pleasing to publishers and authors; but very few, if any, of the novels of the year have any chance of more than ephemeral popularity. On the other hand, by contrasting the popular books of five or six years ago with the popular books of the last twelve. months, we can reach some very pleasing

Successful
Fiction

of 1905.

IN THE BOOKMAN for May, 1903, there appeared tabulations of the successful authors and best selling books from 1895 to 1902 (inclusive) as compiled from the records of THE BOOKMAN from the time of its establishment. These tabulations showed that the authors who had enjoyed the most popular favour in the years mentioned were, in order, Winston Churchill, Gilbert Parker, Ian Maclaren, James Lane Allen, Sienkiewicz and Charles Major. A glance through the lists of the last year brings us to the conclusion that either the vogue or the literary activity of most of these men is past; for in not one month has one of these names appeared opposite one of the six best selling books. Knowing

« PreviousContinue »