The Next Deal: The Future Of Public Life In The Information Age

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Basic Books, 2008 M01 7 - 284 pages
American politics today is run on scandal and sound bites because our politicians have become disconnected from the government and public that they serve. Vast changes brought about by the information revolution and the global economy-and by the new "Choice Generation" of Americans under the age of thirty-have yet to impact America's centralized, one-size-fits-all government programs. Enter Andrei Cherny, who uses his unique vantage point as a twentysomething with experience working closely with the President and Vice President of the United States to consider what these vast changes will mean for American government and society. Cherny convincingly argues that Americans are coming to demand a Choice Revolution in government-expanding democracy by taking decision-making power out of the hands of experts and putting back into the hands of ordinary people. But more individual power doesn't mean just more individualism. Cherny proposes a truly interactive government in which increased government responsiveness is met with an increased commitment on the part of the public to the common good.

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Contents

V
51
VI
91
VII
215
VIII
245
IX
249
X
253
XI
259
Copyright

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Page 94 - Sometimes it is said that man cannot be trusted with the government of himself. Can he, then, be trusted with the government of others ? Or have we found angels in the form of kings to govern him ? Let history answer this question.
Page 235 - To coal and iron mines, to freight trains, to fishing fleets in December, to dish-washing, clotheswashing, and window-washing, to road-building and tunnelmaking, to foundries and stoke-holes, and to the frames of skyscrapers, would our gilded youths be drafted off, according to their choice, to get the childishness knocked out of them, and to come back into society with healthier sympathies and soberer ideas.
Page 116 - You come to us and tell us that the great cities are in favor of the gold standard; we reply that the great cities rest upon our broad and fertile prairies. Burn down your cities and leave our farms, and your cities will spring up again as if by magic; but destroy our farms and the grass will grow in the streets of every city in the country.
Page 115 - We do not come as aggressors. Our war is not a war of conquest; we are fighting in the defense of our homes, our families, and posterity. We have petitioned, and our petitions have been scorned; we have entreated, and our entreaties have been disregarded; we have begged, and they have mocked when our calamity came. We beg no longer; we entreat no more; we petition no more. We defy them.
Page 115 - There are two ideas of government. There are those who believe that, if you will only legislate to make the well-to-do prosperous, their prosperity will leak through on those below. The Democratic idea, however, has been that if you legislate to make the masses prosperous, their prosperity will find its way up through every class which rests upon them.
Page 227 - The mobs of great cities add just so much to the support of pure government, as sores do to the strength of the human body.
Page 63 - And now, four centuries from the discovery of America, at the end of a hundred years of life under the Constitution, the frontier has gone, and with its going has closed the first period of American history.
Page 119 - Then for fear some hint that the state had become respectable might percolate through the civilized portions of the nation, we have decided to send three or four harpies out lecturing, telling the people that Kansas is raising hell and letting the corn go to weeds.
Page 116 - It is the issue of 1776 over again. Our ancestors, when but three millions in number, had the courage to declare their political independence of every other nation ; shall we, their descendants, when we have grown to seventy millions, declare that we are less independent than our forefathers 1 No, my friends, that will never be the verdict of our people.
Page 120 - What's the matter with Kansas? Nothing under the shining sun. She is losing wealth, population, and standing. She has got her statesmen, and the money power is afraid of her. Kansas is all right. She has started in to raise hell, as Mrs. Lease advised, and she seems to have an over-production. But that doesn't matter. Kansas never did believe in diversified crops. Kansas is all right. There is absolutely nothing wrong with Kansas. "Every prospect pleases and only man is vile.

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About the author (2008)

A former senior speechwriter to Vice President Gore -- and the youngest White House speechwriter in American history -- Andrei Cherny lives in Los Angeles, California.

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