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POTATOES (IRISH). One hundred and twenty-six varieties have been grown, and full memoranda as to sixty odd varieties made. One bulletin has been printed, and another will be forth coming. In addition to variety tests we are now carrying to completion a fertilizer test. This includes not only yield, but the liability of certain manures to produce disease, and to lessen the starch content. Various portions, and sizes and sections have also been planted, from the smallest to the largest whole tubers, to different weights of cuttings. They have been successfully grafted on the tomato, Jamestown (Jimpson) weed, and other kindred plants, and visa versa.

PEAS (ENGLISH).
The following have been given a two years' test :

Abundance, Admiral, Alaska, Alpha, American Wouder, Blue Beauty, Blue Peter, Chelna, Champion of England, Daniel O’Rouke, Duke of Albany, Duke of York, Dwarf, Wrinkled, Extra Early Market, Extra Onion, Ever Bearing, Fill Basket, First of all, French Canner, Giant White Sugar, Gradus, Gregory's Surprise, Heroine, Horsford's Market, Jobu Bull, Juno, Mammoth Grey Seeded Sugar, Melting Sugar, Marrowfat, Black Sugar, Marrowfat White, Marrowfat Black Eyed, McLean's Advancer, McLean's Little Gem, Ne Plus Ultra, Nott's Excelsior, Perfect, Philadelphia, Premium Gem, Pride of the Market,

Prince of Wales, Queen,

,

Sander's Marrow, Station, Shropsbire Hero, Saint Dutton's, Strattagena, Telegraph, Telephone and Yorkshire Hero. 50 varieties in all.

Seeds of all these varieties are on exhibition at this office, as well as of all varieties of beans grown.

Parsley, parsnips and pepper, radishes, rhubarb, spinach, squashes and turnips have all been tested, and only wait an opportunity to have their merits disclosed.

STRAWBERRIES. Full memoranda of our strawberry tests cannot be given in this report. Some tests are completed and some under way. We have ninety varieties in all, besides tests of fertilizers, soils and manner of growing. We are also growing them froni seed, and by cross fertilization. The following is the yield of sixty-five varieties in 1897:

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Aroma.. Buback Buback, No. 5. Barton Beard's ever-bearing. Bederwood. Beecber Belle... Beverly Bissel Brandywine .. Chas. Downing Cloud Columbian Crawford Crescent Cumberland ('yclone . Dayton .. Du Pre Seedling Edgar Queen.. Enhance Enormous Eureka Grandy Grandy Belle.. Great Pacific.. Greenville Haverland Hoffman Holland Hovey · lowa beauty.. Ivanhoe Kentucky Lady Thompson. Louise Lovett...

3970 quarts per acre. 3851 .4830 .4313 .2829 ..3988

4858 2610 .3570 .4386 .3625

5827 . 3770 .. 2700 ..2863

5500 . 3461 3480 5147 .5534

2999 ..3697 .4028 . 3679 .4658 4712 .4785 4250 . 3915 ..3896 3960 3171 . 3035 .. 3615

3461 .5075

2555 ..3045

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Marshall..
Mary ..
Meek's early
Michell....
Middleford
Muskingum
Newman
Orange County.
Parker Earle...
Phillips
Princess...
Prince of Berries.
Princeton Chief.
Rio ....
Saunders
Sharpless
Shuckless
Shuster's Gem.
Splendid
Swindell....
Tennessee Prolific.
Thompson, No. 39
Timbrelli,
Van Deinon..
Warfield
Wilson ..
Woolverton

.4703 quarts per acre.
. 2845
.3208
.4132
. 2610

2175
. 2084
..3597
..4522
. 1233.

3208
.4159
.4186
.3316
2827
.4676
.1894

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.4630
.2474
.4404
.4585
. 2628.
.3606
.2755
.4694
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THE ORCHARD AND VINEYARD. The first trees and vines were planted in 1892, mostly on old, poor, worn out lands. These lands have been very much improved, but need much more humus and plant food before the trees can make a maximum growth or crop. Species and varieties have been added from time to time until now. We have, in round numbers, about 2,000 trees, consisting in part of apples, pears, peaches, plumb, persimmon, quinces, pecan, walnuts, filberts, figs, etc. The following is a partial list of apples:

Arkansaw Queen, Alexander Ice Cream, Black Warrior, Ark. M. Twigg, Ben Davis, Mrs. Bryan, Buncombe, Black Twig, Bearden's Improved. Shockley, Carolina Watson, Carter's Blue, Cullasaga, Cannon Pearmain, Early Harvest, Etonah, Elgin Pippin, Glendale, Golden Beauty, Grimes' Golden, Horse, Hoover, Hocket's Sweet, Hughes' Crab, Hominy, Hyler's Eureka, Hyslop Crab, Henning, Kansas Queen, Kittageskee, Kernodles' Winter, Limbertwigg, Laurence Greening, Lanier's Crab, May Pippin, Mangum, Moon, Maveric Sweet, Montreal Beauty, Nancemond Beanty, Nick-a-jack, Red June, Red Astracan, Royal Limbertwigg, Romanite, Rawl's Jeannette, Rome Beauty, Simmons' Red, Stevenson, Shockley, Siberian Crabs, 4 varieties; Santa, Scott's Cluster, Scott's Crab, Taunton, Transcendent, Tuscaloosa, Virginia Beauty, Wine Sap, Yellow Transparent, Yates, Yopp's Favorite, and others.

The trees were badly injured by the freeze of March 24, 1894, coming, as it did, after the leaves had put out. Yet, notwithstanding this and other damage by insects, blight and disease, the trees have made a reasonable growth and some of them have grown full crops of fruit.

PEARS, Sixteen varieties in dwarfs and thirt y varieties in standards were planted in 1892, and others have been added at sundry times since. They were all doing welt when the freeze of '94 came. All were more or less damaged, but those of the so-called oriental type, the Keeffer, LeConte, Garber, Smith and others were killed to the ground; some of them outright.

In 1897 the fire blight appeared. All affected portions were cut off and burned, but it again made its appearence in '98, and well-nigh destroyed half the orchard.

Vigorous measures were made in the fall to destroy it, and I have every reason to believe that we will succeed.

PEACHES,
Of Peaches the following is a partial list:

Albright, Alexander, Arkansaw Traveler, Amelia, Baldwin's Late, Beatrice, Bernice, Bordeaux Cling, Burke, Mrs. Brett, Bilynes' October, Cole's Early, Chavis' Choice, Chinese Cling, Chinese Free, Crawford's Late, Crawford's Early, Early Rivers, Early Tillotson, Elberta, Eaton's Golden, Eearly Newington, Early Louise, Fox Seedling, Fleter's St. John, Foster, Finley's October, Fluellen, Great

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Eastern, General Greene, General Lee, Globe, Heath's Free' Heath's Cling, Heath's Red, Late White, Hale's Early, Haynes' Surprise, Hawkins White, Italian Dwarf, Keyport, Levey's Late, Lemon Cling, Lady Ingold, Mountain Rose, Muir, Old Mixon, Oriole, Preston Hing, Pallus, Parnell, Pine Apple, Pequett's Late, Reeves, Smock, Scott's October, Susquehanna, Snow White, Snow Cling, Snow Tree, Stump the World, Stonewall Jackson, Tippacanoe, Thurbur, Van Zandt, Van Buren Dwarf, Waterloo, Wager, Wheatland, Wilkins, White English, and others.

All these bave borne more or less fruit, but, despite all our efforts, the most of the crop has been destroyed by late frosts. We have tried many remedies, smudgeing, whitewashing, log fires, but the only successful remedy found was spraying the trees with copious showers of pure water from daybreak until the sun rose.

PLUMB.

Of plums we have over two hundred trees, consisting of Japanese, European, Chickasaw and other species or types, and many varieties of the same. The plums met the same fate as did the peaches by the frosts.

OTHER FRUITS.

Japanese persimmons have been an entire failure, as the trees were killed by frosts after putting out leaves. Figs, unprotected, met the same fate from the cold of the winter. Currants and Gooseberries die without any apparent cause. Quinces do well, but are injured by the fire blight. Raspberries and black berries have been tried on a small scale only. It is our purpose to enlarge on this line. The 80-called wineberry, balloonberry, strawberry and raspberry have been failures with us.

Over one hundred pecans are making a fine growth. English, Japanese and other foreign walnuts have made little growth and many have died.

Grapes will be the subject of a bulletin at no distant date. We have hundreds of seedlings of black walnuts (Juglaus nigra) gathered from over twenty other States, and also many seedlings of our native chestnuts which we propose growing for shade, for fruit and for timber.

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