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EAST-INDIA MISSIONS OF THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING

THE

CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE. (Continued from Vol. for 1814, p. 752.) THE Report for 1792 makes honourable mention of the efforts of the Rev. D. Brown and the Rev. J. Owen, and also of W. Chambers, C. Grant, aud Uday, Esqrs, to keep alive the Society's Mission in Calcutta. The efforts of the Society, however, to procure a supply for that station, had proved unsuccessful.

Mr. Gerické had baptized 71 children and 16 adults, and had put to press a translation of the Pilgrim's Progress in the Malabar Language. Mr. Swartz had bap tized, in the Tanjore station, 87 Heathens, and had received 23 converts from Popery. At Palamcottah, Mr. Janické had baptized 40 Heathens, and received 12 Roman Catholic converts. At Tranquebar, 18 adult converts had been added to the congregation. The schools contained 166 children. The Rev. C. W. Pazold was this year appointed one of the Society's Missionaries.

The Rev. Mr. Swartz, in a letter dated Madras, Feb. 5, 1793, observes concerning the Heathens, that many of them were baptized last year, and particularly some of those called Kaller, who are looked upon as the worst, and somewhat resemble the thievish Arabians."These people, having been in

•The death of Mr. Chambers is an

nounced, in the Report of the succeeding year, as a severe loss to the interests of true religion in India, and to the affairs of the Calcutta Mission in particular.

structed two months, were baptized. Being baptized, we insisted upon their becoming industrious in their proper business. All of them had very good fields, which they were exhorted to cultivate. To these exhortations, we added ocular inspection. I went and visited them in their villages. Having examined them in respect of their knowledge, and prayed with them, which was commonly done in the presence of a great many Heathens, I desired to see the fruits of their industry, on which they fully satisfied me. I then exhorted them to be honest, in paying the usual rent to Government, which they soon did in a pleasing manner. The appearance was agreeable, and the prospect hopeful. As the water courses in their district had not been cleared for 15 years, by which neglect the cultivation was impeded, and the harvest lessened, I entreated the collector to advance a sum of money to clear them, promising to send people to inspect the work. The work was completely done, and those inhabitants who formerly, for want of water, had reaped only 4000 large measures, called kalam, reaped now 14,000 kalam, and rejoiced in the increase. The whole district reaped nearly 100,000 kalam more than they had done the preceding year. But this our joy was soon turned into grief. The Heathens observing that many of their relations wished to embrace Christianity, and that such as had been baptized refused to join in their plundering expeditions, assembled, and formed an encai ment. threatening to extirpate

East-India Missions.

tianity. Now all looked dismal. Many of the Christians were encouraged by their relations, who were Heathens, to form an opposite camp. But I exhorted the Christians to make use of other weapons, viz. prayer, humility, and patience; telling them in strong terms, that if they became aggressors, I should disown them. This disturbance lasted four months, and became very serious, as the malcontents neglected the cultivation of their own fields, and deterred others from doing it. I wrote to these misguided people, (for they had mischievous guides,) sent catechists to them, exhorted them not to commit such horrid sins, and reminded them that my former endeavours, so beneficial to them, had not merited such treatment. At last, finding no opposition from the Christians, and not being willing to be looked upon as the aggres sors, all went to their homes and work, plowing and sowing with double diligence. My heart rejoiced at the kind overruling Providence. Surely he is a God that heareth prayer."

The Rev. Mr. Jænické, in a letter dated at Tanjore, observes, that, at Palamcotta, he had resided ten months, preaching on Sundays in Malabar and English, and on Fridays in Malabar. Sometimes Sattianaden had preached for him, in his native language. The gentlemen and other Europeans regularly frequented the church, to which they were encouraged by the good example of the commanding officer. During his stay at Palamcotta, he had instructed and baptized 60 Heathens, and had likewise received several converts from Popery. The Christians in the Tinnavelly district generally resided in the country, and formed several congregations. For the use of those at Padpanadaburam, and at Parani, he had erected some chapels, at the expense of Mr. Swartz. Many of those converts were Christians, not in name only, but in reality. There

[JAN.

1792. 1793. 1794. 1795. is every reason to hope, he observes, that at a future period Christianity will prevail in the Tinnavelly country. Himself and Sattianaden' had severally made journeys into parts of the country, where the word of God had never before been preached; and the people were generally attentive, and desirous of hearing: they assembled in hundreds, and shewed him every respect, and numbers had conducted him from village to village. Sattianaden had experienced the same attention. More than thirty people came afterwards to Palamcotta to be instructed and baptized.--Such happy effects, he remarks, would often be experienced, could such journeys be frequently repeated.

Mr. Jænické mentions, that Mr. Swartz had translated the Secretary's Letter addressed to Sattianaden, and that its contents had given him unspeakable joy, and had animated him to a greater enjoyment of Christ's holy religion, to live conformably to its rules, to follow Christ, to set a good example to all persons, and to be faithful to the charge committed to him.

quebar state, that 24 Heathens had
The Danish Missionaries at Tran,
been baptized; that 1000 persons
had communicated in the Lord's
Supper; and that 176 children had
been instructed and maintained in
the Mission Schools,

the well-known letter of Mr. Swartz,
The Report of 1794, contains
written to vindicate himself, and the
Missions generally, from the mis-
representations of Mr. Montgomery
Campbell, in the House of Com-
mons; and to which we have often
referred in our pages.

states, that Mr. Claudius Buchan-
The annual account for 1795
an, who is now going out to Bengal,
promises nuch friendly attention to
the concerns of the Calcutta Mis-
sion. Mr. Swartz, at Tanjore, ob-
serves, that contemplating the cir-
cumstances of the Missionaries, he
could not but feel much sorrow.
One at Tranquebar, Mr. Kæning,

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had lately died; Mr. John had been ill; and Mr. Pohlé likewise was ailing. We entreat God, Mr. Swartz observes, to send new labourers into his vineyard.

The Rev. Mr. Pohlé states from Tirutchinapally, that on the 8th of Jan. 1794, he set out for Namaul, in the Baramaul country, where no Protestant Missionary had been before. Having arrived at that place, he continued there with a worthy friend, the then command. ing officer, until the 21st of the month. He had preached daily to the natives, and visited the villages round, and had had the satisfaction of being heard with joy and amaze

ment.

In the account for 1796, the Rev. Mr. Pæzold, in a letter from Vepery, mentions, that in a journey to Tanjore, in company with the Rev. Mr. Swartz, he had had the opportunity, at Tripalore of being present at a conference between that excellent Missionary and about twenty Bramins, to whom he expounded the Christian doctrine; pointing out its great pre-eminence to their heathenism and idolatry. "Their general reply to him was Very true; your doctrine, your religion, your instruction, is a pleasing thing: but it is inconsistent with flesh and blood; it is repugnant to our carnal affections; it strikes at the natural propensity to moral evil, and to worldly pleasures. Moreover, they replied, we do not see your Christian people live conformably to what they teach. The Christians appear to be doing quite contrary: they curse, they swear, they get drunk; they commit whoredom and adultery; they steal, cheat, and deal fraudulently with one another; yea, they blaspheme, and rail upon matters of religion, and often make a mock of those who profess to be religious: in short, they said, you Christians often demean yourselves as badly, if not worse, than we Heathens. Now pray, they added, of what

benefit and advantage is all your instruction and recommendation of Christ's religion, if it does not reform the lives of your own people? Could not you first endeavour to convert your Christians, ere "youattempt to proselyte Pagans?-Mr. Swartz replied to these insufficient objections with so much propriety, and with so wonderful an intrepi-dity and energy, that the Bramins unanimously said at last, Of a truth you are an holy man: if all your Christians thought, and spake, and lived as you do, we would without delay undergo the change, and become Christians likewise. Others said, If you would free us from sickness and from death, without hesitation we would apply ourselves to you: but, instead of that, we see that Christians likewise are subject to death, and even you yourself must die; so that in this respect you are not to be preferred to Heathens." Having produced such trifling observations as these, they all departed.

The Rev. Mr. Kolhoff speaks of his frequent converse with Heathens, of whom the far greater number applaud the doctrine of Christ, but are unwilling to submit to that fundamental precept, If any one will be my disciple, let him deny himself, take up his cross, and follow me. They continue, therefore, to be what they were before. He mentions the having had much satisfaction in the exemplary conduct of several privates of the 71st regiment, stationed at Tanjore, to whom he had several times administered the holy Sacrament. He likewise mentions an affecting dispensation, in the loss of James Dods, in the Company's service, "who, with much piety and great talents, had applied himself to the study of the Gentoo and Tamulian languages; into the former of which he had began to translate some parts of the New Testament, in order to make the saving doctrines of the Gospel known to the natives,

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