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in Abyffinia. It was to bring a wife to Yafous from a race of Galla. Her name was Wobit, daughter of Amitzo, to whom› Bacuffa had once fled when he escaped from the mountain be-fore he was king, and had been kindly entertained there. Her family was of the tribe of Edjow, and the divifion of Toluma, that is, of the fouthern Galla upon the frontiers of Amhara. They were esteemed the politeft, that is, the leaft barbarous of the name. But it was no matter, they were Galla, and that was enough. Between them an Abyffinia, oceans of blood had been shed, and ftrong prejudices imbibed against them, never to be effaced by marriages. She was, however, brought to Gondar, christened by the name of Beffabéé and married to Yafous: By her he had a fon, named Joas, who fucceeded his father.

FOAS.

FROM 1753 TO 1768.

A'S foon as the death of King Yafous was known, the old officers and fervants of the crown, remembering the tumults and confufion that happened in Gondar at his acceffion, repaired to the palace from their different governments, each with a small well regulated body of troops, fufficient to keep order, and strengthen the hands of Ras Welled de l'Oul, whom they all looked upon as the father of his country. The first who arrived was Kasmati Waragna of Damot; then Ayo of Begemder, and very soon after, though at much the greateft diftance, Suhul Michael, governor of Tigrè. These. three entered the palace, with Welled de Joas, who, after a troublesome reign, was affaffinated in his palace, and bu-ried in the church of St. Raphael.

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HANNES II.

1769.

'HANNES, a man upwards of seventy years of age, made his entry into Gondar the 3d of May 1769. He was brother to Bacuffa, and having in his time efcaped from the moun tain, and being afterwards taken, his hand was cut off by order of the king his brother, and he was fent back to the place of his confinement. It is a law of Abyffinia, derived from that of Mofes, that no man can be capable either of the throne or priesthood, unless he be perfect in all his limbs; the want of a hand, therefore, certainly difqualified Hannes, and it was with that intent it had been cut off; but this objection was easily over-ruled. However, befides his age, he was very feeble in body; and having had no converfation but with monks, and priests, this had debilitated his mind as much as age had done his body. He could not be perfuaded to take any share in the government, and when he was defired to take the field to defend his kingdom, he wept, hid himself, turned monk, and demanded to be fent back to his former place of confinement. The confequence was, that he' was one day` poifoned at his breakfast.

TECLA HAIMANOUT II.

1769.

TECLA HAIMANOUT fucceeded his father. Hewas a prince of a moft graceful figure, tall for his age, rather thin, and of the whiteft fhade of Abyffinian colour, fuch are all those princes that are born in the mountain. Though he had been abfent but a very few months from his native mountain, his manners and carriage were thofe of a prince, that from his infancy had fat upon an hereditary throne. He had an excellent understanding, and prudence beyond his years. He was faid to be naturally of a very warm temper, but

this

this he had fo perfectly fubdued as scarcely ever to have given an instance of it in public.

With the beginning of this king's reign, we fhall close the Annals of Abyffinia, and return to Mr. Bruce at Mafuah, after which we shall accompany him from thence in his journey to Gondar,

TRAVELS

TO DISCOVER THE

TRAVELS

SOURCE OF THE NILE.

GONDAR

ACCOUNT OF MR. BRUCE'S JOURNEY FROM MASUAH TO TRANSACTIONS THERE-MANNERS AND

CUSTOMS OF THE ABYSSINIANS.

BOOK V.

MA

ASUAH, or the harbour of the Shepherds, is a fmall ifland on the Abyffinian fhore, having an excellent harbour, and water deep enough for fhips of any fize to the

very edge of the island: here they may ride in the utmost fecurity, from whatever point, or with whatever degree of ftrength, the wind blows. The island itself is very small, scarce three quarters of a mile in length, and about half that in breadth; one third occupied by houses, one by cifterns to receive the rain-water, and the last is reserved for burying the dead.

P

This island was a place of much resort as long as commerce flourished; but it fell into obfcurity very fuddenly, under the oppreffion of the Turks, who put the finishing hand to the ruin of the India trade in the Red Sea, begun fome years before by the discovery of the Cape of Good Hope, and the settlements made by the Portuguese on the continent of India.

On

On the 19th of September 1769, our traveller arrived at Mafuah, very much tired of the fea, and defirous to land. But, as it was evening, he thought it advisable to fleep on board that night, that he might have a whole day (as the firft is always a bufy one) before him, and receive in the night any intelligence from friends, who might not choose to venture to come openly to fee him and his company in the day, at least before the determination of the Naybe, of that place, had been heard concerning them.

the governor

On the 20th, a perfon came from Mahomet Gibberti to conduct Mr. Bruce on fhore. The Naybe himfelf was fill at Arkeeko, and Achmet, his coufin and fucceffor, therefore, had come down to receive the duties of the merchandize on board the veffel which brought Mr. Bruce. There were two elbow-chairs placed in the middle of the marketplace. Achmet fat on one of them, while the feveral officers opened the bales and packages before him: the other chair on his left hand was empty. He was dreffed all in white, in a long Banian habit of muflin, and a close-bodied frock reaching to his ankles, much like the white frock and petticoat the young children wear in England. This species of dress did not, in any way, fuit Achmet's fhape or size; but, it feems, he meant to be in gala. As foon as Mr. Bruce came in fight of him, our traveller doubled his pace: Mahomet Gibberti's fervant whispered to Mr. Bruce not to kifs his hand, which indeed he intended to have done. Achmet food up, just as he arrived within arm's length of him; when they touched each others hands, carried their fingers to their lips, then laid their hands across their breafts: Mr. Bruce pronounced the falutation of the inferior Salam Alicum! Peace be between us; to which he answered immediately, Alicum Salam! There is peace between us. He pointed to the chair, which Mr. Bruce declined; but he obliged him to fit down.

In these countries, the greater honour that is shown you at first meeting, the more confiderable prefent is expected. He made a fign to bring coffee directly, as the immediate offering of meat or drink is an affurance your life is not in danger.

He

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