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Gen. MacArthur that it was probable, owing to the difficulties of the country, that he would not be able to place his right at Polo that day, but hoped to be there early next morning. Gen. Wheaton now suspended his forward movement, in order that the enemy might not be driven beyond Polo or Malinta before the ground in that vicinity had been seized by Gen. MacArthur. Night closed with Gen. Wheaton's right connecting with Otis' Brigade of the second division, and the line close to the Tuliahan, with the enemy all driven to the north bank. March 26th, at daylight, the indications were that the enemy was preparing for retreat.

The city of Malabon, on the left, was on fire, and a stream of fugitive soldiers, of the enemy, and inhabitants, was pouring from the city toward the north. Col. Egbert was ordered to ford the Tuliahan River with his regiment—the 22d U. S. Inf.—near the right, and form line perpendicular to the river, his right to the north, his left to be supported by the battalion 23d U. S. Inf. By 11 A. M. all entrenchments near the river were carried, the 2d Oregons on the left meeting with an obstinate resistance. Gen. Wheaton crossed the river in person at this time near the railroad bridge, and the rebels opened fire from an entrenchment half way, from the river to Malinta, from walls, loopholed for musketry about the church, and from entrenchments at Malinta. The 22d U. S. Inf. was ordered to form line, facing the entrenchments, and to charge and carry them, which the regiment did with great gallantry. Col. H. C. Egbert was mortally wounded in this charge, and died soon after. At the same time the 2d Oregon, on the left, carried everything before it. The 3d U. S. Art. now-about 12 m.-entered Malinta. The enemy fled north, pursued by Gen. MacArthur's center and right. Gen. Wheaton's whole brigade went into camp at Malinta, the two remaining battalions of the 3d U. S. Inf. having joined from the transport, about dark. March 27th, under order from the Division Commander, the 2d Oregon was left at Malinta, and the rest of the brigade joined head of column. The battalion of the 23d U. S. Inf. was returned to Manila. At 8:40 A. M. Gen. Wheaton received a despatch from the Department Commander to be under his orders direct, and to keep railroad open in the rear of Gen. MacArthur's Division. March 28th, the 3d

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JUST BEFORE THE ADVANCE. and 22d Infs. marched to Marilao. March 29th, the Marilao was crossed and the brigade marched up the railroad. March 30th, the 13th Minnesota Volunteer Inf. was assigned to Gen. Wheaton's command. Column moved at 6:30 A. M. All trains were left at Bocaue with one battalion, 22d U. S. Inf., as guard. The column reached Guiguinto at 9:30 A. M., and before dark the 3d U. S. Inf., Col. Page, and

two battalions 22d U. S. Inf. were in bivouac, one half mile in rear of MajorGeneral MacArthur's line of battle, one and one-half to two miles from Malolos. In conference with Gen. MacArthur it was decided that Gen. Wheaton should support his attack on the enemy's position, in front of Malolos, by supporting his left with two battalions 22d U. S. Inf. and his right with three battalions 3d U. S. Inf. March 31st, soon after daylight, the five battalions mentioned were placed, deployed in two lines of skirmishers, closed to two and one-half paces interval; distance between lines, 500 yards. The right and left battalions to lap over and beyond the line of battle of the division. Action commenced about 7 A. M., the left occupying Malolos, the enemy's capital, early in the day. Gen. Wheaton was with the right and opened fire on an entrenchment of the enemy with Hotchkiss revolving cannon, soon after the line was formed.

After some maneuvering, Hale's Brigade carried the enemy's works, and pursued him in the direction of Calumpit. The entire movement from the lines in front of Caloocan to Malolos was a complete success. Great damage and heavy loss in killed and wounded was inflicted upon the rebels, and nowhere was the

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WHERE THE NEBRASKA REGIMENT LOST TWELVE MEN WITHIN FIFTY YARDS. Proto by Boomer. enemy able to considerably retard the advance. He was in strong force in front of our lines on March 25th. In front of Gen. Wheaton's Brigade his entrenchments were held by not less than 4000 men, mostly armed with Mauser rifles. The conduct of our officers and men was distinguished by daring and the utmost energy. Gen. Wheaton expresses the highest admiration for the distinguished gallantry of Col. Harry C. Egbert, 22d U. S. Inf., who fell at Malinta during the charge of his regiment upon the enemy's entrenchments. He should be held in grateful remembrance by his countrymen. The gallant conduct of Col. O. Summers, 2d Oregon Volunteer Inf., on March 25th and 26th, is worthy of the highest praise. He maneuvered his regiment with ability and did excellent service, inspiring his command which fought with courage and determination. The conduct of Capt. John G. Ballance, 22d U. S. Inf., was distinguished for courage and skill. His ability in handling his battalion under the enemy's fire is worthy of the highest consideration. Gen. Wheaton states that he is indebted for valuable asistance to Capt. H. C. Cabell, 3d U. S. Inf., Assistant Adjutant-General U. S. V.; 1st Lieut. F. D. Webster, 20th Inf., Aide-de-camp; 2d Lieut. W. D. Connor,

Corps of Engineers, Acting Aide-de-camp, and 2d Lieut A. P. Hayne, Battery A, California Volunteer Heavy Artillery, Acting Aide-de-camp; that they carried his orders to all parts of the field during these operations; he expresses his thanks for the courage and ability with which they carried his orders. Gen. Wheaton also states that Maj. G. F. Shiels, Brigade Surgeon of Volunteers, rendered valuable service in bringing wounded from the most exposed places, and in many instances carrying orders under the heaviest fire of the enemy.

THE GILMORE INCIDENT. In the latter part of March, during the period covered by this chapter, the gunboat Yorktown was ordered to patrol the coast of Luzon. After liberating foreign residents in towns where they were held as prisoners, the Yorktown proceeded northward as far as the province of El Principe, stupping at the capital town of Bales, where she arrived April 12th. The province contains about 50,000 inhabitants, and is a mountainous country. The town of Bales has a population of nearly 12,000, and is ten days' distant by land from Manila—three days on horseback, and seven by coach. So isolated is the place that neither the natives nor Spanish residents were aware of events transpiring in Manila, nor of their changed relations to each other, or the world.

The Spanish had maintained a garrison at Bales, which for nearly a year had peen besieged by the insurrectos, a siege which was continued nothwithstanding surrender of Spain's claims to sovereignty. The garrison consisted of eightythree soldiers, three officers and two priests, who were defending themselves in a church. The mission of the Yorktown was to acquaint the insurrectos with the change in government, and to rescue the beleaguered garrison. On the arrival of the Yorktown, Lieut. J. C. Gilmore, and Ensign W. H. Standley were directed to proceed up the river in the Yorktown's launch, making soundings, and discovering the conditions of affairs at Bales. On arriving at the mouth of the river, Ensign Standley landed, and Gilmore with a party from the gunboat proceeded up the stream, soon being concealed from view by a bend in the shore. Shortly after losing sight of the boat, Standley heard a bugle call, followed by three volleys and cheering. That the launch had been surprised by insurrectos, he did not doubt, and as the automatic gun with which the boat was equipped, made no reply, it seemed almost certain that Gilmore and party had been killed, or taken prisoners.

Returning to the ship with this report, search was instituted for the Lieutenant, his party, and the launch, but nothing coming to light about either, after a few days, during which the Filipinos refused to communicate with the American officers, the Yorktown continued her voyage to Iloilo. From that time, and to the time when these pages are printed, the party have been held as prisoners by the Filipinos.

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CHAPTER IX.

MACARTHUR'S MARCH ON SAN FERNANDO.

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OR some weeks after the capture of Malolos, MacArthur's

Division remained there awaiting further developments. The position of affairs was not much changed, except that the headquarters of the insurrectos had been pushed back a few miles. The insurrectos were as active as ever, and their lines confronted ours near Malolos, just as they had previously confronted them at Caloocan. Whenever the Americans appeared in force the insurrectos retired. When the Americans fell back, the insurrectos returned.

About this time Gen. H. G. Otis resigned and returned to the United States, and was succeeded in the command of the 1st Brigade by Gen. Lloyd Wheaton on April 2d. The regiments of Wheaton's Brigade were partly returned to Manila and partly scattered along the line of the railroad upon guard duty, under command of Gen. Wheaton. Gen. Wheaton remained in command of the 1st Brigade until our forces reached San Fernando, and was also in general charge of the railroad communications with Manila. On April 14th, the 10th Pennsylvania Regiment was relieved by the 51st Iowas.

During the second week in April, a body of insurrectos appeared near the railroad between Malolos and Manila, threatening our communications. Gen. Wheaton proceeded to attend to that matter, and the following, written by an officer of his brigade, describes his operations in so doing:

WHEATON'S OPERATIONS ALONG THE RAILROAD. At 1 A. M. April 11th, Gen. Wheaton received a despatch from the commanding officer at Bigaa that the enemy had attacked in force at Bocaue, on the railroad, our line of communication; that he was attacked and that he wanted re-inforcements. In compliance with instructions from Major-General MacArthur, commanding the second division, Gen. Wheaton immediately proceeded (on foot) in the direction of points attacked, taking with him a detachment of twenty-five men of the 4th Cav. (dismounted), under command of Lieut. Charles Boyd, 4th U. S. Cav. Upon reaching a company of the 13th Minnesota Volunteer Inf., encamped two and one-half miles south of Malolos and along the railroad track, it was found that an additional company had been sent there from Guiguinto. The company was ordered to follow the General, and also one platoon of the other company. Upon arriving at the bridge, one mile or less from Guiguinto, the company there was ordered to follow. The command arrived at Guiguinto as the

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