Page images
PDF
EPUB
[blocks in formation]

Virtue, the strength and beauty of the soul,
Is the best gift of Heaven; a happiness
That, even above the smiles and frowns of
fate,

Exalts great Nature's favourites; a wealth That ne'er encumbers, nor can be transferr'd.

C.

ARMSTRONG-Art of Preserving Health.
Bk. IV. Line 284.

Virtue is like a rich stone, best plain set.
d. BACON-Essay. Of Beauty.

Virtue is like precious odours, most fragrant when they are incensed or crushed.

e. BACON--Essay. Of Adversity.

There is no road or ready way to virtue; it is not an easy point of art to disentangle ourselves from this riddle or web of sin. f. Sir THOMAS BROWNE-Religio Medici.

Sec. 55. Whilst shame keeps its watch, virtue is not wholly extinguished in the heart. BURKE-Reflections on the Revolution in France.

Y•

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

VIRTUE.

The only amaranthine flower on earth
Is virtue: the only lasting treasure, truth.
COWPER-The Task. Bk. III.

p.

Virtue alone is happiness below.

[ocr errors]

453

Line 268.

CRABBE-The Borough. Letter XVII.

Virtue, dear Friend! needs no defence;
The surest guard is innocence:
None knew till guilt created fear
What darts or poison'd arrows were.

1'.

WENTWORTH DILLON (Earl of Roscommom)-Translation. The Twentysecond Ode of 1st Book of Horace. St 1.

A virtuous deed should never be delay'd, The impulse comes from Heav'n, and he who strives

A moment to repress it, disobeys
The god within his mind.

S. ALEXANDER Dow-Sethona.
Virtue is her own reward.

t. DRYDEN--Tyrannic Love. Act III.

Se. 1. Virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm. DRYDEN-Imitation of Horace. Bk. I. Ode XXIX. Line 87.

น.

It is a far greater virtue to love the true for itself alone, than to love the good for itself alone.

v. EMERSON-First Visit to England. The only reward of virtue is virtue.

2.

EMERSON-Essay. Of Friendship.

Oh, Virtue! I have followed you through life, and find you at last but a shade. x. EURIPIDES.

Fooled thou must be, though wisest of the

wise:

Then be the fool of virtue, not of vice. From the Persian.

y.

Shall ignorance of good and ill
Dare to direct the eternal will?
Seek virtue, and, of that possest,
To Providence resign the rest.

Z. GAY-The Father and Jupiter. The virtuous nothing fear but life with shame,

And death's a pleasant road that leads to
fame.
GEO. GRANVILLE (Lord Lansdowne)-
Verses Written 1690.

aa.

Virtue is its own reward. bb. GAY-Epistle to Methuen. Line 42. His failings leaned to virtue's side. cc. GOLDSMITH-Deserted Village.

Line 164.

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

So unaffected, so compos'd a mind;
So firm, so soft; so strong, yet so refin'd;
Heav'n, as its purest gold, by Tortures try'd;
The saint sustain'd it, but the woman died.
r. POPE-Epitaph VI.

Virtue may choose the high or low Degree,
'Tis just alike to Virtue, and to me;
Dwell in a Monk, or light upon a King.
She's still the same, belov'd, contented thing.
POPE--Epilogue to Satires. Dialogue Ï.
Line 137.

8.

[blocks in formation]

According to his virtue let us use him,
With all respect and rites of burial.
Within my tent his bones to-night shall lie,
Most like a soldier, order'd honourably.
20. Julius Cæsar. Act V. Sc. 5.

Assume a virtue, if you have it not,
That monster, custom, who all sense doth
eat

Of habit's evil, is angel yet in this;
That to the use of actions fair and good
He likewise gives a frock, or livery,
That aptly is put on.

X. Hamlet. Act III. Sc. 4.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[blocks in formation]

They now to fight are gone;
Armor on armor shone;
Drum now to drum did groan,

To hear was wonder;
That with the cries they make,
The very earth did shake;
Trumpet to trumpet spake,

Thunder to thunder.

m. DRAYTON-- Baliad of Agincourt.

Against beleaguer'd heaven the giants move. Hills piled on hills, on mountains mountains lie,

To make their mad approaches to the sky. n. DRYDEN'S Ovid's Metamorphoses. The Giants' War. Line 2.

All delays are dangerous in war.
0. DRYDEN--Tyrannic Love. Act I. Sc. 1.

The trumpet's loud clanger
Excites us to arms,

With shrill notes of anger,

And mortal alarms.

p.

DRYDEN-A Song for St. Cecilia's Day.

War he sung, is toil and trouble;
Honour but an empty bubble.

[ocr errors]

DRYDEN-Alexander's Feast. Line 97.

[blocks in formation]
« PreviousContinue »