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Mr. Jackson to Mr. Hay.

No. 2026.]

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, August 7, 1902. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the due receipt of your instructions, Nos. 1347 and 1369, respectively, of June 5 and July 17, relating to the expulsion of the brothers Albert and Nathan Eisemann.

When this case was first brought to the attention of the German foreign office, reference was made to the words " for police reasons, but so long as there was a possibility that the orders complained of might be recalled in toto, no especial stress was laid upon their use. Upon the permission for the Messrs. Eisemann to remain in Prussia being extended for a second time—until April next-a formal request was made that in justice to the gentlemen in question some official statement be made to the effect that the expulsion order had been issued on account of the nonperformance of military service and not on account of anything against the character of the parties concerned."

There is reason to believe that some such certificate of character will be made public before long, although it is not yet known what form this will take. I have, etc.,

JOHN B. JACKSON.

Mr. White to Mr. Flay.

No. 2039.]

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, August 20, 1902. Sir: Referring to the embassy's dispatch No. 2026, of the 7th instant, I have the 'honor to report that the “Regierungs-Präsident” at Wiesbaden has published an official announcement, under date of August 13, mentioning the orders which were issued last December in the cases of the brothers Albert and Nathan Eisemann, and stating that " no other police grounds, but merely the fact that the brothers had not performed military service prior to their emigration from Prussia had given occasion to their expulsion.” In view of this announcement of the fact that permission has been granted the brothers to remain in Frankfort on the Main until next April, and of the statements with regard to their wishes in the matter which were made to me by the Messrs. Eisemann and communicated by me to the German foreign office, I shall take no further action in this matter unless positively instructed to do so by you. I am, etc.,

AND. D. WHITE.

Mr. Adee to Mr. Jackson.

No. 1398.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, September 5, 1902. SIR: Mr. White's No. 2039, of the 20th ultimo, has been received.

The public official explanation of the words “for police reasons” in the order expelling the Eisemann brothers from Prussia appears to be what the Messrs. Eisemann desired, and the incident may therefore be considered closed. I am, etc.,

ALVEY A. ADEE,

Acting Secretary.

EXPULSION OF JOHANN WILHELM LOHMANN.

Mr. White to Mr. Hay.

No. 1992.]

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, July 2, 1902. Sir: I have the honor to report that intervention was made on May 31, 1902 (F. O., No. 1182), and renewed on June 7 (F. O., No. 1186) in behalf of one Johann Wilhelm Lohmann, a naturalized American citizen of German origin. Lohmann had at first informed the embassy that he was threatened with expulsion, and then that he had actually been expelled. He wished to be permitted to remain at his former home for about three months.

Lohmann was born in Flögeln, Province Hannover, in 1878, and emigrated to the United States in 1893, where he became naturalized as a citizen last April. He then returned to Germany, having in his possession passport No. 53913, which was issued to him by the Department of State on April 11. On his arrival in Flögeln he complied with the local regulations regarding registration. On May 29 he was told that he must leave Prussia, and on June 5 he was called upon at the house of his mother and compelled to accompany a gendarme across the Prussian frontier to Bremerhaven.

To-day a note has been received from the foreign office in which it is stated that the Royal Prussian Government is not in a position to permit him to stay at his former home.

Lohmann, who was formally sentenced on account of his evasion of military duty, became naturalized in the United States in April and returned at once to his birthplace. As his sojourn there is not desired, the order of expulsion can not be revoked.

This information has been communicated to Lohmann, who has been living in Bremerhaven since his expulsion from Prussia without molestation. I am, etc.,

AND. D. WHITE.

EXPULSION OF LEO HESS.

Mr. White to Mr. Hay

No. 2020.]

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, August 4, 1902. Sir: I have the honor to report that on the 21st of May last the embassy was informed, through the United States consul-general at Frankfort on the Main, that one Leo Hess had received an order from the local authorities to leave Prussia within three weeks, and that he had addressed a petition to them requesting to be allowed to remain there for four months longer.

Hess was born in Germany and went to the United States when about 13 years of age. Subsequently, as shown by papers in his possession, he obtained a release from Prussian allegiance and became naturalized as an American citizen in the superior court of the city of New York on January 8, 1883. He returned to Germany and went to Frankfort with his family in April of this year and took an apartment, where his wife was subsequently confined. Early in May he received the order above referred to, which only mentioned him personally and not bis

family: Hess expected to return to the United States in July, while his wife remained in Frankfort until next year.

The embassy immediately addressed a note to the foreign office, supporting Hess's petition and requesting that he might be allowed to remain as he desired. No reply having been received to this note, another note was addressed on July 1, and on the ed instant an answer came from the foreign office. In this it was stated that on account of his wife's confinement in April Hess had been granted permission to remain until August 1, but that a longer stay could not be permitted, and that the order expelling him could not be withdrawn. The reason for this is stated to be on account of false information given by Hess to the authorities upon his arrival at Frankfort. Hess is said to have then affirmed that he was born in New York, whereas investigation proved that he was born in Germany. It is noted, however, that through the embassy's support Hess has virtually been accorded all he wished for. I have, etc.,

AND. D. WHITE.

EXPULSION OF CHARLES VON OEHSEN, (CARL) CHRISTIAN MARK

HOFF AND FAMILY, AND HENRY BLOHM.

Mr. White to Mr. Hay.

*

*

No. 2040.]

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, August 20, 1902. SIR:

I have the honor to report the expulsion from Prussia of Charles Von Oehsen, (Carl) Christian Markhoff and family, and Henry Blohm, American citizens of German origin, who had returned on visits to their former homes, in the neighborhood of Bremen. Von Oehsen and Blohm emigrated when about 16 and 14 years old, respectively, and duly became naturalized as American citizens, neither of them having performed military service in Germany. Von Oehsen returned to Germany almost immediately after his naturalization, last April, and after moving about the country and making several visits at his former home he was told, on July 5, that he must leave Prussia. The embassy intervened soon thereafter, to the end that he might remain until August 30, Von Oehsen living in Bremen in the meantime. On August 5 a reply was received, in which it was stated that he could not be permitted to return to Prussia, and that his expulsion from Bremen was being considered. The consul now writes that Von Oebsen was expelled from Bremen, and that he sailed for the United States on the 16th instant.

In June Blohm complained that the local authorities had told him that he would be allowed to remain in Prussia for two months, and the embassy then intervened in his behalf, to the end that he might be permitted to prolong his stay until October. The foreign office has now replied that Blohm had, at his own request, been granted permission to remain in Prussia till July 1; that he had then started upon a trip and his present whereabouts are unknown, and that as his continued residence was not considered desirable the order of expulsion would not be canceled.

Christian Markhoff is the father of the young man whose expulsion was reported in the embassy's dispatch No. 1714, of August 28, 1901. He and his family are reported as being anxious to go back to the United States, but that as they are in straitened circumstances they are unable to do so. In June, however, the local authorities ordered them to leave Prussia, and the embassy thereupon made intervention in their behalf. The foreign office bas now replied that the Royal Prussian Government is not in a position to allow the family (with the exception of the two eldest daughters, who appear to be able to support themselves) to remain here longer. I am, etc.,

AND. D. WHITE.

Mr. Jackson to Mr. Hay.

No. 2041.]

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, August 23, 1902. Sir: Referring to the embassy's dispatch No. 2040, of the 20th instant, I have the honor to report that the German foreign office has now informed the embassy that the senate of the free city of Bremen had also decided that permission to sojourn could not be granted to Charles Von Oehsen, because he emigrated to the United States shortly before reaching the age of military service, and because he returned immediately after having acquired American citizenship. As he is now only 23 years old, his presence in Germany under these conditions is considered undesirable. I have, etc.,

John B. JACKSON.

EXPULSION OF MADS PEDER L. FYSANT.

Mr. Jackson to Mr. Hay.

zen.

No. 2122.]

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, October 25, 1902. Sir: I have the honor to report that the embassy intervened on the 25th ultimo in behalf of one Mads Peder L. Fysant, an American citizen of Danish origin, to the end that he be permitted to remain in Prussia until October 17.

Fysant was born in Schleswig-Holstein in 1867, and emigrated to the United States in 1884, duly becoming naturalized as an American citi

Last August he returned to Germany on a visit to his parents, at Langetwedt, in Schleswig, and after he had been there about a month he was told by the local police that he would be expelled if he did not leave of his own accord at once. Nothing further was heard from Fysant after intervention in his behalf was made, and it now appears that he was not molested again.

The foreign office has informed the embassy to-day that Fysant was permitted to remain in Prussia in accordance with its request, but that his further sojourn in his former home was not desired, as he had evaded military service by his emigration. I have, etc.,

John B. JACKSON.

EXPULSION OF SAMUEL SAMUEL.

Mr. Dodge to Mr. Ilay. No. 2158.]

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, December 8, 1902. Sir: I have the honor to report that on the 19th ultimo the embassy was informed through the consul at Kehl that one Samuel Samuel desired to make a visit at his former home at Weitersweiler, in Elsass, for three, or, if possible, for six months, his uncle having already obtained a permission for him to remain there for two weeks, which would soon expire. Samuel emigrated to the United States in 1895, when he was 17 years of age, having secured a release from his German allegiance, and became naturalized October 9 of the present year. Permission to make the desired visit was immediately requested of the foreign office, and nothing further of the case was heard until on the 6th instant the consul reported that Samuel had been compelled to leave the country and had gone to Switzerland. To-day a note from the foreign office states that permission to make a longer sojourn at his former home can not be granted, and that, after full consideration of his case, no ground was apparent which made it possible to make an exception for him to the established principle. The wishes of the embassy had so far been taken into account that upon his uncle's application he had been given permission to remain for fourteen days.

It is to be noted in this case that Samuel was a native of the "Reichsland,” to which Germany does not admit that our naturalization treaties apply. Further, the usually unfavorable circumstances were presented of emigration nearly at the military age and return almost immediately after naturalization, just when the men about of bis own age were performing their military duty, thus not improbably causing dissatisfaction among them. I have, etc.,

H. PERCIVAL DODGE.

MXLITARY SERVICE CASES OF RENE HUTTLER, EUGENE HERR,

AND MEYER SCHWARTZ.

Mr. White to Jr. Hay.

No. 1987.)

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, June 30, 1902. Sir: Referring to the embassy's dispatch No. 1814 of December 31, 1901, I have the honor to append hereto a memorandum report of certain military cases, more particularly mentioned below, which have not been the subject of previous correspondence or which have been settled during the quarter ending to-day. There were no military cases to report for the quarter ending March 30 last. I am, etc.,

AND. D. WHITE.

[Inclosure.)

Military case report.

At the instance of his attorney, Mr. Theo. Steeg, of Buffalo, N. Y., the embassy addressed a note (F. O., No. 1130) to the imperial foreign office on Maren 21, 1902,

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