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ments to the Constitution and By-Laws are under discussion, Daughters of the American Revolution and the press on:y shall be present," amended by adding "in the Opera House." I am instructed by the Chair to state that Mrs. Jewett has amended her motion by the addition of the words “in the Opera House."

PRESIDENT GENERAL. If there is no objection it will stand amended.

Mrs. BALLINGER. I object to the amendment. The no se is on this floor.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. The question was asked whether there was any one present who objected to the amendment.

Mrs. BALLINGER. I don't see wherein it differs from the original one. Will she read both ?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. It simply specifies the place, that is all.

Mrs. BALLINGER. Wasn't she talking about the whole Opera House?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Do you mean the whole Opera House? [Laughter.]

Mrs. JEWETT. Certainly, I meant the whole Opera House.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. If there is no objection the amendment will stand.

Mrs. Ballinger. I object to the words “Opera House.”

Mrs. JEWETT. I move to amend the motion by the addition of "the entire Opera House."

Seconded.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. It is moved and seconded to amend the motion by adding the words "the entire Opera House."

Mrs. BALLINGER. I object.
PRESIDENT GENERAL. Are you ready for the question?

Mrs. BALLINGER. No, Madam President, we want a little time for debate.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. It has been stated, and has to go to the vote of the assembly.

Mrs. MAXWELL. I rise to a question of privilege; may the motion and the amendment be read?

READER. “I move that during to-day's session, when amendments to the Constitution and By-Laws are under discussion, Daughters of the American Revolution and the press only shall be present,” amended “in the entire Opera House.”

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Are you ready for the question?

Mrs. LOCKWOOD. We all understand that it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than it is for anybody who is not a Daughter to get on this floor. You take the next gallery, and you have the same thing. If there are any strangers here they must go into the dome, and they are so far removed from this body that I cannot see where they are going to interfere with our work. [Applause.]

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Debate is not on the main question; it is on the amendment, adding the words "the entire Opera House."

Mrs. Lockwood. That is what I am talking about, from the dome down here.

READER. Whether or not these words shall be added to it is the question.

Mrs. BALLINGER. Madam President, we are not ready for it.

READER. It is just adding these words “in the entire Opera House."

Mrs. BALLINGER. I object to the amendment.

Mrs. LOTHROP. Wouldn't it be better to say the audience room of the Opera House; as we cannot keep them out of the entire Opera House wouldn't it be better to say from the audience room?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. All in favor of adding these words to the main motion will please say "aye;" opposed, "no;" the motion is lost. The question recurs to the main motion.

Mrs. WALKER, of Illinois. It seems to me, after the public has been courteous enough and interested enough to come here and take seats provided for them to listen to us in our deliberations, that it would be very discourteous to send them down two flights of stairs and out home before they are ready to go. [Applause.]

Mrs. McLean. May I simply say that I echo the sentiments of Mrs. Walker, of Illinois ? [Applause.]

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Are you ready for the question?

READER. The main motion : "I move that during to-day's session, when amendments to the Constitution and By-Laws are under discussion, Daughters of the American Revolution and the press only shall be present."

PRESIDENT GENERAL. You have heard the motion. All in favor will please say “aye;" contrary, “no.” The motion is lost.

Mrs. Nash. I rise to a question of privilege affecting the whole body.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. State your question of privilege.

Mrs. Nash. I move that if practicable, a blank book be kept in the foyer or lobby of the theater, in which delegates may register their names, number of their seats, and hotel addresses, and that the House Committee be requested to attend to this matter at their earliest convenience.

Seconded.
Mrs. Nash. May I speak to that motion.
PRESIDENT GENERAL. Is there a second to this?
Seconded.

READER. “I move that a blank book be kept in the foyer or lobby of the theater in which delegates may register their names, number of their seats, and hotel addresses, and that the House Committee be requested to attend to this matter at their earliest convenience."

Mrs. Nash. This will be to avoid confusion. Now, it has been the experience of all delegates, as it has been mine, that we are constantly stopped to know “Where is Mrs. Jones, of Arkansas ?" If the Daughters would register their names, the friends inquiring for them could come to the book and find the number of their seats or hotel addresses, and send a page to them. I would like to amend my motion by adding the word “alphabetically.”

PRESIDENT GENERAL. If there are no objections it can be considered so amended.

Mrs. WALKER. The seats of part of our delegation are underneath this gallery; we can just hear, or hardly hear; we can't hear very well; and after Congress is in full session it would seem to me that we might have the privilege of coming into vacant seats. We are occupying them this morning, near here.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. It would be very gratifying to the Chair to have the unfilled seats in the front part of the house filled by the delegates that are in the rear. If it is acceptable to the delegates it will be done. Is there any objection? I hear none. Mrs. Nash's motion is before the house. Are you ready for the question ? All in favor will please say "aye;" opposed, “no.” The motion is carried. I beg the indulgence of the house for a few moments while I have the pleasure of presenting three distinguished women, Mrs. May Wright Sewall, whom many of you have listened to during the past week, Miss Susan B. Anthony, and Mrs. Howland. I am sure the house will be very glad to rise and greet them.

Mrs. ANTHONY. Quite likely you see on this platform now the very oldest daughter of the American Revolution, and granddaughter, in your Society. Mrs. President, •my grandfather Reed, on my mother's side, was of good fighting stock; on the Anthony and Lapham's side, Quakers. And though they were Quakers, it is reported that when the word came after the battle of Lexington, every boy of them that was over twenty-one, Quaker and all,' put on his sword and went out, but nevertheless it was against the rules of the church. But on the other side it was all right. My grandfather Reed was at the Heights at Quebec, was at Ticonderoga in the old thin line, was at Bennington, etc., during the American Revolution. So I feel, my dear friends, that in making me—the Irondequoit Chapter of my city of Rochester-in making me an honorary member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, I have a right to claim a place among you, and I am g'ad to be one of you. [Applause.] And I know that all of you feel that I have been fighting for the last fifty years to secuưe genuine patriotism amongst the women of this Nation. So I hope you will gather up all the relics of our ancestors, and of our revolutionary mothers as well as fathers, and that we shall do all in our power to make worthy ourselves as the descendants of those glorious old mothers who threw their tea overboard into Boston Harbor rather than to submit to taxation without representation.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. I introduce Mrs. May Wright Sewall.

Mrs. SEWALL. Madam President, Daughters of the American Revolution. In the interests of a revolution that shall carry still greater reforms to the uttermost corners of the globe, I salute you. It was at your request that the National Council of Women sent to you Miss Susan B. Anthony as a fraternal delegate from the National Council; therefore, I have no claim upon your attention. But it seems that one must in some way justify her presence, so I will say that my ancestors were as miscellaneous in opinion as their descendant is versatile in hers. By three lines, the Bracketts, the Cottons, and the Clarks, the blood left to flow in my veins was consecrated on revolutionary battlefields. By one, the Tory who returned to the old home, his descendant is also able to justify her place, if she wished to do so, in the Loyal Imperialist Legion of Great Britain. She does not wish to do so, but now that the duties of the presidency of the National Council of Women are lifted from her shoulders, she hopes to have time to put before the representatives of this distinguished body her modest historical claims to one day coming among you as a Daughter, peer of peers. [Applause.] This is a high ambition. In uttering it I wish to say that I have followed with gratitude the work of this body of women, for I be ieve that the one thing lacking to our national patriotism is an intelligent alliance of family history with national history, a consciousness of the fact that our Nation is an aggregate of individuals, of families, and that the history of families must be known by their descendants, that the institution of the Nation may be cherished by their descendants. I thank you.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. We have the pleasure of having with us also Mrs. Howland, but she prefers to be the power behind the throne and not be heard.

Mrs. THOMPSON, of Massachusetts. I received a circular last evening on the floor of this house; it was handed to me by a member of the National Board; it is unsigned. I would like to know if it is authorized by the Board? It is a circular relating to part of the Treasurer General's account, and on the end of it it says, "Do the Daughters wish to incur annually a debt of $10,000 ?" I would like to know if this is authorized by the Board ?

Dr. McGee. I would like to say in answer to that quest'on that it was not authorized.

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