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All communications relating to the publications of the Department of Health should be

addressed to the Commissioner of Health, 149 Centre Street, New York

Entered as second class matter May 7, 1913, at the post office at New York, N. Y.,

under the Act of August 24, 1912.

New SERIES. Vol. II.

NOVEMBER 1, 1913.

No. 44

PASTEURIZATION OF GRADE B MILK. With the adoption by the Board of Health October 28 of a resolution which follows, and which requires that Grade B milk shall be pasteurized, the process of pasteurization will have been applied to all milk used in this city with the exception of Certified, Guaranteed, and Inspected milk of Grade A, buttermilk, condensed milk and certain milk products. The following is the full text of the resolution eliminating the class "Selected Milk-Raw” from Grade B:

"Resolved, That section 56a of the Sanitary Code be and the same is hereby amended to take effect on and after February 1, 1914, so as to read as follows,

"Section 56a. All milk held, kept, offered for sale or sold and delivered in The City of New York shall be so held, kept, offered for sale or sold and delivered under either or any of the following grades or designations and under no other, and in accordance with such rules and regulations as may from time to time be adopted by the Board of Health, namely: "Grade A. For Infants and Children

“1. Certified or guaranteed milk.
"2. Inspected milk (raw).

"3. Selected milk (pasteurized).
"Grade B. For Adults

"Pasteurized milk.
"Grade C. For Cooking and Manufacturing Purposes Only-

"Condensed skimmed milk.

“Condensed or concentrated milk. “The provisions of this section shall not apply to buttermilk or to milk products commonly known as Kumyss, Matzoon, Zoolak, dried milk or milk powder, or to other similar preparations, or to cream or modified milk."

IMPORTANT CHANGES AFFECTING GRADE B MILK. At a meeting of the Board of Health of the Department of Health, held October 28, 1913, the following resolutions were adopted :

"Resolved, That the following regulations under 'Grade B, for Adults,' namely:

"Selected Milk-Raw. "Definition: Selected milk (raw) is milk handled and sold by dealers holding permits therefor from the Board of Health, and produced and handled in accordance with the following minimum requirements, rules and regulations :

"Requirements, Rules and Regulations. "I Only such cows shall be admitted to the herd as have been physically examined by a regularly qualified veterinarian and declared by him to be healthy and free from tuberculosis in so far as a physical examination may determine that fact. Such an examination of all cows shall be made at least once each year.

"2. The farms at which the milk is produced must obtain at least 68 points in an official score of the Department of Health. These 68 points shall be made up as follows: A minimum of 25 points for equipment and a minimum of 43 points for method.

"3. The milk shall not contain an excessive number of bacteria when delivered to the consumer or at any time prior thereto. -"be and the same are hereby repealed, to take effect on and after January 31, 1914.

"Resolved, That the rules and regulations adopted by the Board of Health April 9, 1912 (and thereafter amended), relating to the care and sale of milk, be and the same are hereby further amended under the heading 'Grade B, for Adults—Pasteurized Milk,' to read as follows, and to take effect on and after February 1, 1914:

“Definition: Pasteurized milk (Grade B) is milk produced under a permit issued therefor by the Board of Health and produced and handled in accordance with the following minimum requirements, rules and regulations and in further accordance with the special rules and regulations relating to the pasteurization of milk:

“Requirements, Rules and Regulations. “1. All containers in which pasteurized milk is delivered to the consumer shall be plainly labeled 'Pasteurized.' Labels must also bear the date and hours between which the pasteurization was completed, the place where pasteurization was performed and the name of the person, firm or corporation performing the pasteurization.

"2. The milk must be delivered to the consumer within 36 hours.
"3. No milk shall be pasteurized more than once.
“4. No milk containing an excessive number of bacteria shall be pasteurized.

"General Regulation for Grade B. "1. Caps of bottles containing milk of Grade B shall be white and marked "Grade B’ in bright green letters, in large type.

2. Cans containing milk of Grade B shall have a tag affixed to each can with the words 'Grade B’ in large type in bright green letters.”

a

RESOLUTION AFFECTING PASTEURIZED GRADE B CREAM AND ITS

CONTAINERS. Attention is called to the following resolution adopted at a meeting of the Board of Health of the Department of Health, held October 28, 1913, in which a change in the definition of Grade B Pasteurized Cream is made and also in the manner in which it shall be labeled :

"Resolved, That the rules and regulations relating to the sale of cream in The City of New York, adopted by the Board of Health August 26, 1913, be and the same are hereby amended under the leading '(b) Grade B Cream (Pasteurized)' as follows:

"Definition: Grade B Cream (Pasteurized) is cream which is made from pasteurized milk or from raw milk and pasteurized.

“4. All containers in which pasteurized cream is delivered to the consumer shall be plainly labeled 'Pasteurized, and bottle labels shall give the name of person, firm or corporation bottling, and place where bottled.”

STERILIZATION OF BATHING SUITS. During the summer a business was established opposite the municipal baths at Coney Island for the purpose of hiring out bathing suits to bathers, and it developed that the Department of Health, under section 26 of the Sanitary Code, which relates to bathing beaches, could not enforce the proper sterilization of these suits. Section 26 was therefore amended at a meeting of the Board of Health, held October 28, 1913, in order to remedy this defect. The entire resolution is lengthy and it hardly seems necessary to quote it in full. The amendment adds that "bathing suits shall not be hired out * without a permit in writing from the Board of Health and subject to the conditions thereof."

*

*

DEATH RATE FOR THE WEEK. There were 1,183 deaths and a death rate of 11.49 per 1,000 of the population reported during the past week as against 1,149 deaths and a rate of 11.59 for the corresponding week of 1912, an increase of 34 deaths, and a decrease of 10 of a point. If the increase in population be taken into consideration, in lieu of an increase of 34 deaths there would be a decrease of 11 deaths.

At this season of the year, low mortality rates from infectious diseases are prev. alent as a rule. During the past week there were 3 deaths reported from measles: 4 from scarlet fever; 18 from diphtheria; 8 from whooping cough, and 8 from typhoid fever. The number of deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis approximated closely that of 1912. The mortality rates from diarrhoeal diseases and the pneumonias were considerably below the figures for the corresponding week of 1912. On the other hand the deaths from heart diseases increased from 167 in 1912 to 191 during the past week.

The mortality under one year and under five years of age was about the same. while that of sixty-five years and over was considerably above the experience of 1912.

The death rate for the first forty-four weeks of 1913 was 13.88 per 1.000 of the population as against a rate of 14.19 per 1,000 for the corresponding period of 1912.

VITAL STATISTICS
Summary for Week Ending Saturday, 12 M., November 1, 1913.

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• Corrected according to borough of residence.

1. The presence of several large institutions, the great majority of whose inmates are non-residents of the city, increases considerably the death-rate of this Borough.

Deaths by Principal Causes. According to Locality and Age.

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* If the deaths under one month, numbering 88, from all causes, be deducted from the total deaths under one year, the resultant rate will be 49 deaths of infants per 1,000 births (weekly average July 1, 1912 to July 1, 1913)

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