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" That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity ; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with... "
Digest of the Laws of Virginia: Which are of a Permanent Character and ... - Page 17
by Joseph Tate - 1841 - 959 pages
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The Central Law Journal, Volume 92

1921
...assurance, as near as may be, should be in the spirit of the Founders of governments in America, viz: "That all men are by nature equally free and independent,...of society, they cannot by any compact, deprive or divert their posterity, namely the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the- means of acquiring and...
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House Documents, Otherwise Publ. as Executive Documents ..., Volume 1, Part 2

United States. Congress. House - 1874
...that this right of emigration or expatriation isoiie of those inherent rights of which, when t!i<-v enter into a state of society, they cannot by any compact deprive or divest their posterity. But although municipal laws cannot takeaway or destroy this right, they may regulate the manner and...
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National Teachers' Monthly, Volume 2

1875
...upon the famous Declaration of Rights, declaring that " All men are by nature equally free, and have inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a...by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity, etc."; adopted a preamble and resolutions on independence; and instructed their delegates to the General...
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Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Volume 13

Massachusetts Historical Society - 1875
...given above, corres|>onds to the first article from the Virginia Declaration, which follows: — " That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when (Ley enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity...
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Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Volume 13

Massachusetts Historical Society - 1875
...and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot, dy any compact, deprive or divest their posterity ; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, wtth the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety."...
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White and Black: The Outcome of a Visit to the United States

Sir George Campbell - 1879 - 420 pages
...to sever said nation, are unauthorised, and ought to be resisted with the whole power of the State. 1. That all men are by nature equally free and independent,...inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a slate of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment...
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Ohio Educational Monthly, Volume 28

1879
...in a state of savagery and ignorance, does not leave society and the individual to the free use and enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property and pursuing happiness and safety. History and present observation have also certainly taught government there are...
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The Republic of Republics: Or, American Federal Liberty

Bernard Janin Sage - 1881 - 606 pages
...Convention, which rights do pertain to them and their posterity as the basis and foundation of government. 1. That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when thcy enter into a state of society, they cannot by any compact deprive or divest their posterity; namely,...
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The Southern Law Review, Volume 6

1881
...are both streams from the same prolific fountain. The first article of the Virginia Bill declares, " that all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights the which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest...
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The Southern Law Review: And Chart of the Southern Law and ..., Volume 6

1881
...are both streams from the same prolific fountain. The first article of the Virginia Bill declares, " that all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights the which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest...
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