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" Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us, that are squires of the night's body, be called thieves of the day's beauty; let us be — Diana's foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the moon : And let men say, we be men of good government;... "
Edmund Spenser: New and Renewed Directions - Page 216
edited by - 2006 - 385 pages
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The Art of Comedy Writing, Volume 10

Arthur Asa Berger - 1997 - 127 pages
...facetious must be made clear to one's audience. FALSTAFF: Marry, then, sweet wag, when them art king let not us that are squires of the night's body be...mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal. (Henry IV, Part I, act 1, scene 2) Here Falstaff is being facetious and using language playfully to...
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Making Trifles of Terrors: Redistributing Complicities in Shakespeare

Harry Berger, Peter Erickson - 1997 - 487 pages
...appears in Falstaff's famous play on body /bawdy /beauty /booty: Marry then sweet wag, when thou art king let not us that are squires of the night's body be...mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal. (1.2.23-29) The paradox in the last phrase is that those who steal under Diana's sylvan authority also...
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Repräsentation von Zeit bei Shakespeare: Richard II, Henry IV, Macbeth

Jutta Schamp - 1997 - 370 pages
...aufgrund des Bezugs auf den Mond mit Wandel300 assoziiert: Marry then sweet wag [Hai], when thou art king let not us that are squires of the night's body be...men say we be men of good government, being governed äs the sea is, by our noble and chaste mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal. (Shakespeare,...
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The First Part of King Henry IV

William Shakespeare - 1997 - 214 pages
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Shakespearean Criticism: Excerpts from the Criticism of William ..., Volume 39

1984
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Shakespearean Criticism Yearbook

Michelle Lee - 1998 - 420 pages
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Night at the Vulcan

Ngaio Marsh - 1998 - 256 pages
..."If you wouldn't mind taking your hands out of your pockets, sir," Fox suggested. The Doctor said: "Let not us that are squires of the night's body be called thieves of the day's beauty," and obligingly withdrew his hands from his trousers pockets. Unfortunately he pulled the linings out...
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The Globe Illustrated Shakespeare: The Complete Works Annotated

William Shakespeare - 1979 - 2364 pages
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Reading Readings: Essays on Shakespeare Editing in the Eighteenth Century

Joanna Gondris - 1998 - 379 pages
...of tides appears likewise from the First Part of Henry the Fourth , Act I. scene 2, "being govern'd as the sea is, by our noble and chaste mistress the moon." Shakespeare seems to have been thinking of the 19th ode of Anacreon ['H yf| u,e\aiva mvei,] of which...
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