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" Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us, that are squires of the night's body, be called thieves of the day's beauty; let us be — Diana's foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the moon : And let men say, we be men of good government;... "
Edmund Spenser: New and Renewed Directions - Page 216
edited by - 2006 - 385 pages
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1803
...as will serve to to prologue to an egg and butter. I', Hen. Well, how then ? come, roundly, roundly. let not us, that are squires of the night's body,...mistress the moon, under whose countenance we — steal. P. Hen. Thou say'st well; and it holds well too: for the fortune of us, that are the moon's men, doth...
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King Henry the Fourth: A Historical Play, Parts 1-2

William Shakespeare - 1803
...Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us, that are squires of the night's body, be call'd thieves of the day's beauty ; let us be — Diana's...let men say, we be men of good government ; being govern'd as the sea is, by our noble and chaste mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal....
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The Plays of William Shakespeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1803
...us, that are squires of the night's body, be call'd thieves of the day's beauty;-let us be—Diana's foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the...And let men say, we be men of good government; being govern'd as the sea is, by our noble.and chaste mistress the moon, under whose countenance we—steal....
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The Plays of William Shakespeare ...

William Shakespeare - 1803
...question seems to be, that Falstaff had asked in the night what was the time of the day. JOHNS. Line 138. let not us, that are squires of the night's body, be called thieres of the day's beauty ;] This conveys no manner of idea to me. How could they be called thieves...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare : Accurately Printed from the ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1805
...butter. P. Hen. Well, how then ? come, roundly, roundly. Fal. Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us, that are squires of the night's body,...mistress the moon, under whose countenance we — steal. P. Hen. Thou say'st well ; and it holds well too : for the fortune of us, that are the moon's men,...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1805
...OO P. Hen. Well, how then ? come, roundly, roundly. Fal. Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us, that are squires of the night's body,...mistress the moon, under whose countenance we — steal. P. Hen. Thou say'st well ; and it holds well too : for the fortune of us, that are the moon's men,...
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Notes Upon Some of the Obscure Passages in Shakespeare's Plays: With Remarks ...

John Howe Baron Chedworth - 1805 - 375 pages
...the tides appears likewise from the First Part of Henry the Fourth, Act I. scene 2, " being govern'd as the sea is, by our noble and chaste mistress, the moon." Shakespeare seems to have been thinking of the 19th ode of Anacreon [H 7^ fu\a.na1, wivct] of which...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With Notes of Various Commentators, Issue 7

William Shakespeare - 1806
...question seems to be, that Falstaff had asked in the night what was the time of day. JOHNSON. 6 — let not us, that are squires of the night's body, be called thieves of the day's beauty.] This conveys no manner of idea to me. How could they be called thieves of the day's beauty ? They robbed...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1806
...butter. P. Hen. Well, how then? come, roundly, roundly. Fal. Marry then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us, that are squires of the night's body, be called thieves of the day's beauty;5 let us be — Diana's foresI I * Phoebus, — he, that wandering knight so fair.] Falstaff...
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The Plays of Shakspeare: Printed from the Text of Samuel Johnson ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1807
...butter. P. Hen. Well, how then ? come, roundly, roundly. Fal. Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us, that are squires of the night's body, be called thieves of the day's beauty; let us be—Diana's foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the moon : And let men say, we be men of...
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