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" Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us, that are squires of the night's body, be called thieves of the day's beauty; let us be — Diana's foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the moon : And let men say, we be men of good government;... "
Edmund Spenser: New and Renewed Directions - Page 216
edited by - 2006 - 385 pages
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The Tragedy of Richard III, with the Landing of Earle Richmond, and the ...

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 500 pages
...of the moon is not very natural. — STEEVENS: The same thought has already occurred in 1 Hen. IV: 'being governed, as the sea is, by our noble and chaste mistress the moon.' [I, ii, 32. The First Quarto of i Hen. IV. is dated 1598, one year later than the present play. In...
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Shakespeare's Political Realism: The English History Plays

Tim Spiekerman - 2001 - 208 pages
...poetic defense of yet another one of his vices, thievery: Marry then sweet wag, when thou art king let not us that are squires of the night's body be called thieves ol the day's beauty: let us be Diana's foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the moon; and...
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Shakespeare and Machiavelli

John Alan Roe, Both Professors of Maths John Roe - 2002 - 218 pages
...first scene takes the form of a blandishment: Falstaff. Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us that are squires of the night's body be...mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal. (1.2.22-8) Such language is often understood to be a pastiche of Lyly's euphuistic style, and the element...
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Power Plays: Shakespeare's Lessons in Leadership and Management

John O. Whitney, Tina Packer - 2002 - 320 pages
...ordinary men, is guided not by Phoebus, the sun, but by the moon: Marry then sweet wag, when thou art king let not us that are squires of the night's body be...mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal. KING HENRY IV, PART 1 (1.2, 23-29) In short, Falstaff is a true lunatic (from the Latin for "moonstruck"),...
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Shakespeare, Machiavelli, and Montaigne: Power and Subjectivity from Richard ...

Hugh Grady, Professor of English Hugh Grady - 2002 - 286 pages
...Invention of the Human, 281-2, on the parallel with Sancho Panza. Marry then, sweet wag, when thou art king let not us that are squires of the night's body be...mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal. (1.2.20-6) Unlike Quixote's mad vision, however, Falstaffs seems to contain within itself some tacit...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 34

Stanley Wells - 2002 - 224 pages
...quibble on 'superfluous'), as his following speech shows: Marry then sweet wag, when thou art king let not us that are squires of the night's body be...mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal. (1.2.23-9) Here the yoking asks for acceptance rather than rejection, and the quibbles are more insistent...
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The Wisdom of Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 2002 - 228 pages
...housekeeper goes as fairly as to say a careful man and a great scholar. Feste— TN IV.ii When thou art king, let not us that are squires of the night's body be...mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal. Falstaff—1 Henry IV I.ii There lives not three good men unhanged in England: and one of them is fat...
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Sovereign Amity: Figures of Friendship in Shakespearean Contexts

Laurie Shannon - 2002 - 240 pages
...political regime of friendship ahead of him: Marry then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let us not that are squires of the night's body be called thieves...sea is, by our noble and chaste mistress the moon. (1HIV, 1.2.21—27) The high artifice confounding day and night; the oxymoronic concept of "gentlemen"...
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William Shakespeare: The Complete Works

William Shakespeare - 1989 - 1280 pages
...Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us that are squires of the night's body be call'd ث 2 govern'd, as the sea is, by our noble and chaste mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal....
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 48

Stanley Wells - 2002 - 312 pages
...pretence - his own and his friends' disreputable activities: 'Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us that are squires of the night's body be...Diana's foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of ... our noble and chaste mistress the moon, under whose countenance we steal' (1.2.22-8). At Shrewsbury,...
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