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" But when the intervals of darkness come, as come they must, — when the soul seeth not, when the sun is hid, and the stars withdraw their shining, — we repair to the lamps which were kindled by their ray to guide our steps to the East again, where... "
How to Master the Spoken Word: Designed as a Self-instructor for All who ... - Page 15
by Edwin Gordon Lawrence - 1913 - 420 pages
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Conserving Words: How American Nature Writers Shaped the Environmental Movement

Daniel J. Philippon - 2004 - 373 pages
...beliefs, only narrow interpretations of them" (122-23). 19. Compare Emerson in "The American Scholar": "When he can read God directly, the hour is too precious...wasted in other men's transcripts of their readings" (89). 20. His other items of baggage included his plant press, a few toilet articles, a change of underwear,...
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Contending with Stanley Cavell

Russell B. Goodman - 2005 - 216 pages
...glosses his remark (in "The American Scholar") "Books are for the scholar's idle times" by saying: "When he can read God directly, the hour is too precious...when the intervals of darkness come, as come they must—when the sun is hid and the stars withdraw their shining—we repair to the lamps which were...
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The American Classics: A Personal Essay

Denis Donoghue - 2008 - 304 pages
...which readers do not allow themselves to be subdued by what they read. They remain their own seers. "Books are for the scholar's idle times. When he can...precious to be wasted in other men's transcripts of their readings."13 Emerson and "The American Scholar" The clue to Emerson's extravagances, in this part of...
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Canadians and Americans: Myths and Literary Traditions

Katherine L. Morrison - 328 pages
...into the past. "Books," he says, are merely a record of another's "act of creation." He argues that "books are for the scholar's idle times. When he can...precious to be wasted in other men's transcripts." In a later essay, Emerson writes that history is an "impertinence and an injury if it be anything more...
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The Midwestern Pastoral: Place and Landscape in Literature of the American ...

William Barillas - 2006 - 258 pages
...taken transcendentalism to heart, following Emerson's pronouncement in "The American Scholar" that "[b]ooks are for the scholar's idle times. When he...wasted in other men's transcripts of their readings" (58). In a moment resonating with the graveyard imagery of so many of his poems, Wright drops the book...
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Bildung versus Self-Reliance?: Selbstkultur bei Goethe und Emerson

Philipp Mehne - 2008 - 226 pages
...der fremden Literatur begrenzt werden soll. „Man Thinking must not be subdued by his Instruments. Books are for the scholar's idle times. When he can...wasted in other men's transcripts of their readings." (CW l, 57). Andererseits betont Emerson gerade die Faszination, die von einigen englischen Autoren...
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Unchristian America: Living with Faith in a Nation that was Never Under God

Michael Babcock - 2008 - 221 pages
...that God is present, or immanent, in all things. "When [the scholar] can read God directly," he said, "the hour is too precious to be wasted in other men's transcripts of their readings." Emerson was not speaking of the God of the Bible, however. As one scholar has described it, "Emerson's...
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An Anatomy of Skepticism

Manfred Weidhorn - 2006 - 429 pages
...value books for themselves rather than for rendering reality. Reading books is for leisure at best. "When he can read God directly, the hour is too precious to be wasted in other men's transcript of their readings." His friend Thoreau is likewise against poets speaking "so much from...
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