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" On this question of principle, while actual suffering was yet afar off, they raised their flag against a power, to which, for purposes of foreign conquest and subjugation, Rome, in the height of her glory, is not to be compared ; a power which has dotted... "
Masterpieces of Eloquence: Famous Orations of Great World Leaders from Early ... - Page 10703
edited by - 1905 - 11114 pages
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1862 - 776 pages
...generation, in the name of your country, in the name of liberty, to thank you ! ENGLAND. She has dotted the surface of the whole globe with her possessions...following the sun and keeping company with the hours, cirele the earth daily with one continuous and uubroken strain of the martial airs of England. THE...
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The Standard Speaker: Containing Exercises in Prose and Poetry for ...

Epes Sargent - 1862 - 558 pages
...power which has dotted over th« surface of the whole globe with her possessions and military poets ; whose morning drum-beat, following the sun, and keeping company with the hours, circles the earth daily with one continuous anj unbroken strain of the martial airs of England. * 183. PEACEABLE SECESSION,...
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THE UNION AND THE WAR. A SERMON, PREACHED NOVEMBER 27,

WILLIAM G. T. SHEDD, D. D., - 1863
...purposes of foreign conquest and subjugation, Rome, in the height of her glory, is not to be compared ; a power which has dotted over the surface of the whole...and unbroken strain of the martial airs of England/' It was simply the refusal to place the people of the colonies upon the same footing with the people...
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How to Sell Through Speech

Grenville Kleiser - 1920 - 138 pages
...whose morning drumbeats, following the sun and keeping company with the hours, circle the earth daily with one continuous and unbroken strain of the martial airs of England.' On going out of the Senate, one of the members complimented Mr. Webster upon this, saying that he was...
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Historic English

James Champlin Fernald - 1921 - 281 pages
...be made a reality. We recall the ringing tribute of Daniel Webster to British genius for expansion : "A power which has dotted over the surface of the...and unbroken strain of the martial airs of England." All these various territories interact and interlock, so that no traveler can pass around the earth...
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HOYT'S NEW CYCLOPEDIA OF PRACTICAL QUOTATIONS

KATE LOUISE ROBERTS - 1922
...their road; Only the English make it their abode. WALLER— On a War with Spain. (See also CAMPBELL) 3 . The red plague rid you For learning me your language!...foot speaks; her * Troilus and Cressida. Act IV DANIEL WEBSTER — Speech. The Presidential Protest. May 7, 1834. 4 Germany must have her place in...
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Essays and Miscellanies, Volume 1

Joseph Smith Auerbach - 1922
...conquest and subrogation, Rome, in the height of her glory, is not to be compared; a Power which is dotted over the surface of the whole globe, with her...and unbroken strain of the martial airs of England. Webster, too, in his great argument in the so-called Dartmouth College case, conceded — perhaps it...
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Brief Drawing

Ralph Curtis Ringwalt - 1923 - 214 pages
...was saying; that Helen's was "a beautiful face." Or, note Webster's famous apostrophe to England : "A power which has dotted over the surface of the...and unbroken strain of the martial airs of England." In essence, what Webster was saying was that England was "a great military power." Now, the fact that...
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The Ethics of Capitalism

Judson George Rosebush - 1923 - 196 pages
...oil ports of Baku and Batum, the Bagdad railway, Mesopotamia, and the greater part of Arabia. face of the whole globe with her possessions and military...and unbroken strain of the martial airs of England." Magnificent words these, and amply descriptive of the England of 1834, and yet how puny was the Britain...
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Travel and Comment

James Duval Phelan - 1923 - 318 pages
...cannot but be impressed by the picturesque words of Daniel Webster in describing the British Empire, "whose morning drumbeat, following the sun and keeping...and unbroken strain of the martial airs of England." But Britishers can derive but a momentary exaltation of pride from this eloquent tribute. It was delivered...
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